laffite

Re Favorite BBC Productions, Plays, TV, etc...

244 posts in this topic

Hello Jackie!

 

I think the scenes you are referring to, of Catherine repeatedly saying no to Henry's emissaries are in the BBC episode. There is one scene I definitely remember where they are reading a royal document to her, probably either demanding something from her or allowing her some privilege. They refer to her in it as "Catherine Princess Dowager". She bellows There is no such person! She finally takes the document and crosses out all references to the Princess Dowager and writes in Catherine the Queen. When they insist that she not do such things she yells. ( I am paraphrasing from memory) I am the Queen, I have always been the Queen and I will always say it. If you strike me down, I will rise from my grave to say it again. I am the Queen! Stubborn and defiant to the end. It would be funny if it wasn't so sad.

 

I'm glad you liked the caps. I may have went a little screen cap crazy but, thanks to a fellow board member, I'm just learning how to do them. :)

 

I love how your father was so thoughtful in giving you the *Upstairs, Downstairs* set. That was really sweet. :)

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*bonjour drunken captain jack sparrow!*

 

Who me?...(hiccup)...why, I cann no mo drinshk cuz' (hiccup) som'un stole mah rum (hiccup) and thass a factsh. (hiccup) I wonner who it war.

 

*no silly, im not talking about The Little Minister silly! i know you have a copy of that, i meant the Midnight '68 version you have a VHS copy of in your library. :)*

 

Ohhhhhhhhh...

 

Here are some screencaps of Midsummer's Night of '68 using my camera, these are off the VHS. If she looks sad in some of these pictures, it's because she is sad quite a bit in this play. But, of course, there is a happy ending. If you like these, I can make some more for you.

 

photob01.jpg

 

photob03.jpg

 

photob04.jpg

 

photob05.jpg

 

photob02.jpg

 

photob07.jpg

 

BTW, I have some dandy caps of Ian Holm as Puck. Wow, with what energy he plays this part. Also, Diana Rigg is a sweety looking thing and I'll post some of those as well.

 

*trying to make the world a better place with a bottle of rum and a camp fire? wow! heehee! thats not how it was done with geena davis!*

 

Well, pray tell, how was it done with geena davis? Now watch what you say, this is a family-friendly thread. ;)

 

*helen can be sneaky in just about every way possible in those BBC specials.*

 

Gee, that's an understatement. She can be sneaky probably every where. She's a girl, ain't she?

 

*i love that they casted her as an innocent naive girl who had no clue what she was doing until everything hit her at once. she was so funny!*

 

She played an innocent naive girl? Boy, that must have required some acting on her part. ;) Which story was that? She should have gotten the Academy Award.

 

*grandmama taught me her system. she has said that if she dies, noone in the whole family, not even grandpapa could understand her system, only i can. heehee!*

 

Yup, yer grandma knows what she?s doin?. She had it all planned from the very beginning. Her collection is a legacy?to you.

 

*i wish greer had a special society too.*

 

Well, I hate to break this to you but to have a special society you have to be ready for prime time and I?m afraid that some people just haven?t made the grade. I mean it takes more than just a few sappy movies to have a special society. You have to do more than just say, ?Smithy, Smithy,? over and over again in the same movie. But don?t worry, she may have a special society some day---in a billion years. ;)

 

(oooh, I think I'm in the doghouse now. woof woof)

 

///

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Those are lovely, lovely caps from Midsummer, Monsieur. Who is the gentleman playing Lysander? or is it Demetrius? It looks like Gerard Depardieu, but I assume it is not since I think he could not speak English at the time this was made..... :)

 

I am the Queen, I have always been the Queen and I will always say it. If you strike me down, I will rise from my grave to say it again. I am the Queen!

 

Molo- that is exactly the scene I was thinking of - what a great thundering line that is! I can still hear her voice saying it.....thanks for refreshing my memory, I have bumped it up in my Netflix queue to number one......

 

And you certainly did not overdo the screncaps at all, I admire your restraint.....

 

Message was edited by: JackFavell

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Wendy, if that's Lysander in the scene with Helen Mirren, then the actor would be David Warner (and if it was Demetrius, it would be Michael Jayston).

 

By the way, I have never seen this particular version of *A Midsummer Night's Dream* but I would really like to!

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Who me?...(hiccup)...why, I cann no mo drinshk cuz' (hiccup) som'un stole mah rum (hiccup) and thass a factsh. (hiccup) I wonner who it war.

 

well i did it foor your best silly pirate! too much drinking is for mean people....okay that was a very poor attempt on the silly rabbit trix are for kids. heehee! but hey i tried!

 

*Ohhhhhhhhh...*

 

yeah oooooh is right! who knows where i might have hid the rum next. heehee!

 

Here are some screencaps of Midsummer's Night of '68 using my camera, these are off the VHS. If she looks sad in some of these pictures, it's because she is sad quite a bit in this play. But, of course, there is a happy ending. If you like these, I can make some more for you.

 

oh my goodness swasheroo!!! you just made my day!!!! i cant stop looking at them, wow! i hadnt realized how pretty she was in this movie....i really wanna see it now.

 

BTW, I have some dandy caps of Ian Holm as Puck. Wow, with what energy he plays this part. Also, Diana Rigg is a sweety looking thing and I'll post some of those as well.

 

ian holm has gotten so cute as he has aged, you just wanna kiss his sweet cheeks! i have a few thinigs with diana rigg, but not as many. her acting is also very full of energy.

 

Well, pray tell, how was it done with geena davis? Now watch what you say, this is a family-friendly thread.

 

by catching and killing the bad guy so he wouldnt kill anyone else, especially her true love. it was an exchange of saving each other! heehee!

 

Gee, that's an understatement. She can be sneaky probably every where. She's a girl, ain't she?

 

just because she's a girl, doesnt mean shes sneaky at everything! she just happens to possess a trait of sneakiness, how do you think she got her husband Taylor Hackford...wow! you should hear that story. its a pip!

 

She played an innocent naive girl? Boy, that must have required some acting on her part. Which story was that? She should have gotten the Academy Award.

 

you saw her play an innocent gypsy/rich girl who was innocent just trying to help the villagers and just happened along the way snag a guy who in turn just happened to be the man of her dreams and vice versa....these wonderful things happen sometimes! heehee!

 

and she has won the Acandemy Award BTW! for The Queen! its a verey fascinating movie, but she doesnt play an innocent naive girl. heehee! minor detail. :)

 

see!

12910680.jpg

 

Yup, yer grandma knows what she?s doin?. She had it all planned from the very beginning. Her collection is a legacy?to you.

 

are you kidding? the whole family is already fighting over her VHS collection, its a lulu, really! heehee! but they cant run off the the DVD collection without my say, b/c im the only only one who understands it....heehee! grandmama always laughs about that....but i dont plan of her dying in the near future, i love her too much! so i dont think we have to worry about that.

 

Well, I hate to break this to you but to have a special society you have to be ready for prime time and I?m afraid that some people just haven?t made the grade. I mean it takes more than just a few sappy movies to have a special society. You have to do more than just say, ?Smithy, Smithy,? over and over again in the same movie. But don?t worry, she may have a special society some day---in a billion years.

 

start barking! heehee! not really, but you better apologize to greer! you hurt her feelings....and mine! heehee! with all the hard work she did, she deserves one! "smithy! smithy!" was a very heartfelt part of the movie ya know!

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Does anyone remember the BBC series *POLDARK* ? I only saw it once back in the 70's. I thoroughly enjoyed that series at the time. It came out about the same time as Tom Tryon's

*Harvest Home* with Bette Davis.

 

It starred Robin Ellis, Angaharad (spelling?) Rees, and Judy Geeson.

I think they are reshowing it in the UK.

 

It's about a man returning from the war to his estate, and the love story between Gemelza and

Ross is enthralling as I so enjoyed this miniseries as a college gal. I think it was on Masterpiece Theater in 1974 or 1975. Poldark marries Gemelza and it was shocking for the times because she was not one of the landed gentry of his class.

 

Angaharad Rees creates jewelry and has a shop in London now, according to imdb.

 

Commentary, anyone?

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Does anyone remember the BBC series *POLDARK* ? I only saw it once back in the 70's. I thoroughly enjoyed that series at the time. It came out about the same time as Tom Tryon's

*Harvest Home* with Bette Davis.

 

It starred Robin Ellis, Angaharad (spelling?) Rees, and Judy Geeson.

I think they are reshowing it in the UK.

 

It's about a man returning from the war to his estate, and the love story between Gemelza and

Ross is enthralling as I so enjoyed this miniseries as a college gal. I think it was on Masterpiece Theater in 1974 or 1975. Poldark marries Gemelza and it was shocking for the times because she was not one of the landed gentry of his class.

 

Angaharad Rees creates jewelry and has a shop in London now, according to imdb.

 

Commentary, anyone?

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Poldark was great! It was such a nice departure from the one set, indoor BBC productions of that time..... And Angharad Rees was amazing.... what a really fun show it was.....

 

I loved it, it was in the vein of the romantic novel, historical fiction. And ever since I saw it, I've wanted to go to Cornwall and see the craggy landscape and the big stone houses that they showed to such advantage in that show..... :)

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Oh, I'd forgotten the great landscape. It did make me want to wander Cornwall and take it all in.

And I remember the lengthy looks between Robin Ellis and Angahrad Rees and how it seemed so unrequited forever....

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*well i did it foor your best silly pirate!*

 

Everybody's always doing things for my own good. But it never makes me any better. I think Laffite, the pirate, is beyond redemption.

 

*who knows where i might have hid the rum next*

 

Yeah, who knows? But you would have found a good place. See, being a girl, you are very adept at being sneaky. Long ago we used to think that girls were made of...

 

sugar and spice

and everything nice

 

...but now we know better, of course. When God made woman he put the sugar and spice in okay but he added a little sneaky in there too.

 

*ian holm has gotten so cute as he has aged, you just wanna kiss his sweet cheeks!*

 

midph05.jpg

 

How about these cheeks?

 

*Well, pray tell, how was it done with geena davis?*

 

*by catching and killing the bad guy so he wouldnt kill anyone else*

 

Wow, that Geena's some girl, whew! Can she cook?

 

*just because she's a girl, doesnt mean shes sneaky at everything!*

 

Riiiiiight.

 

*she just happens to possess a trait of sneakiness,*

 

Oh, just happens. It doesn't have anything to do with being a girl. Ooooo-kaaay

 

*how do you think she got her husband Taylor Hackford*

 

Let me guess. She was...uh...sneaky?

 

*you should hear that story. its a pip!*

 

Why don't you tell it? I'm always in the mood for good pip, especially if it's a ripping good pip.

 

*you saw her play an innocent gypsy/rich girl who was innocent just trying to help the villagers*

 

That the problem. Playing the innocent was subterfuge. Babbie was actually quite sophisticated and she was being sneaky pretending to be innocent. Tsk, tsk. Well, at least she doesn't go around and killing people like that Geena does. And she probably can't even cook.

 

*and just happened along the way snag a guy who in turn just happened to be the man of her dreams and vice versa....these wonderful things happen sometimes! heehee!*

 

But only in the movies and the BBC.

 

*and she has won the Acandemy Award BTW! for The Queen*

 

Congratulations to Helen...to her I most humbly bow, queen or no.

 

*are you kidding? the whole family is already fighting over her VHS collection, its a lulu, really!*

 

How many tapes does she have? Can you say without betraying a family secret? I have about 1,100 with probably 2,000 movies, mostly from TCM.

 

*start barking! heehee*

 

gifdogrunning-1.gif

 

Sorry, I'm having too much fun just running around. But I'll jump through a few hoops if you have any.

 

*but you better apologize to greer! you hurt her feelings.*

 

yes.gif

 

*"smithy! smithy!" was a very heartfelt part of the movie ya know!*

 

Yeah, I know. No one lets you forget. ;)

 

---

 

Here are a few more caps from the movie:

 

midph01.jpg

 

Do you know this actor?

 

midph07.jpg

 

Or this one?

 

midph06.jpg

 

As you know, Hermia and Helena spend a lot of time in the forest where they get muddied up in the grime. It doesn't seem to hurt their looks that much.

 

midph03.jpg

 

midph04.jpg

 

===

 

Message was edited by: laffite

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*Catwoman* wrote:

 

>This is carzy of course but the Benny Hill Show was soooo hilarious to me. What a great BBC comedy series.

 

Not to everyone's taste depending on the bawdy factor, but yes, very funny. Thanks for the reminder, I haven't seen any of his stuff for a long time. He is well represented on netflix, I see. He used to be on the BBC Channel. I just checked the schedule for the next few day but did not see him there. He's a funny man.

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I don't believe anyone has mentioned "All Creatures Great and Small". I loved this series, and as a result, read the whole series (5+) of books by James Herriot. Siegfried's visits to his "mother", charming Tristan, Helen and the entire Yorkshire Dales came alive for me.

 

Before cable, PBS had the best television viewing options. Still has in some cases.

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I know I keep saying "I loved that show" but......

 

All Creatures is another favorite..... I loved Tristan and Siegfried and poor James - I think that show was about as perfectly cast as any I have ever seen (except when they changed Helens). The fun episodes were ones in which Tristan was trying to get into mischief and Siegfried would follow around and eventually catch him. Or the ones in which Tristan would get James into trouble, especially when he was trying to impress Helen. There is one, though, that I will always remember. I believe through the entire show Tristan was playing practical jokes on everyone, and at the end, Siegfired and James scared Tristan half to death with a practical joke of their own. I think they tried to convince him there was a body in the closet or something, But then Tristan finally couldn't stand the suspense anymore and opened up the closet and there was a guitar..... a gift from Siegfried. It was such a great show, with lots of heart. The best parts were about the animals, and how they were cared for. All the different cases that James went on, it never seemed like anyone was acting on that show....

 

And remember Tricky-woo...... :)

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Yesterday I had a Lottie Wilkins moment. (More about that later)

 

And what is a Lottie Wilkins moment? Well, it?s a widening of the eye, the dropping of a jaw, a far away glazed look, a palpable longing, and a sort of mild paralysis that keeps you quite immobilized, at least for a moment or two, while you reflect in awe.

 

Spoilers ahead

 

Anyone who seen Enchanted April, recently shown on TCM, will know what I?m talking about. For it was that self same Lottie (Josie Lawrence) on an uncomfortable crowded smoke-filled bus with the rain pelting outside and with a countenance suggesting vague discontentment with just about everything who knows too what this moment is all about when she glances at a newspaper ad offering a villa for vacation rent on the coast of Italy. We get a little ethereal jingle as she reads this ad and we know something has happened to her.

 

This is a vacation that has to be had!

 

When she descends from the bus she is on a mission. There she goes. down the sidewalk with her umbrella in great haste. She approaches The Nightingale Women's Club but before she enters she gives a coin to a wounded soldier and then stops to take out a notebook and write something down. We learn later that her husband requires her to record all expenditures. O Lottie, we are beginning to understand?and yes, the husband is a large part of the problem.

 

Inside all the women seem to be reading the newspaper. We see the outer side of one of these newspapers but we can?t see who is doing the reading until that jingle is heard once again and down comes the newspaper and we see the widening of the eye again?this time the eye belongs to Rose Arbuthnot (Miranda Richardson) and something has happened to her too. That little villa, ?a castle really,? is really a good ad.

 

Lottie doesn?t even know Rose but she sees and proposes the venture as a joint effort. Rose is more reserved than Lottie (Lottie is kind of ditsy but a very charming ditsy) and she, Rose, is a bit skeptical at first but she is eventually won over. I admire Lottie?s desperation and strength of purpose here. She practically stalks poor Rose around the room saying things like, ?You look so beautiful and so sad.? She senses instinctively that Rose may be suffering from the same malaise.

 

Indeed, they have something in common.

 

And what is that? Lottie is admonished at the dinner table by her husband, Menersh (Alfred Molina) not to spend money on flowers for the dinner table. There is something unmistakably comic about him from the get go. The most telling image of him we get is a close up of his mouth as he chews on a piece of fish. He is insisting that Lottie come to a business party with him because he must be perceived as a family man. So much for the type of regard he has for her. His hashing out the petty details is amusing to us but not to Lottie. She listens hopelessly and argues in vain. When she tries to broach the subject of the proposed trip without him along, she trails off.

 

In a later scene, however, her desperation pays off when she informs Menersh of her plans while he follows her around the house in a rage. This short, quirky scene ends suddenly when she belts out, ?I?m going!? and then slams the door on his foot.

 

And here?s Rose waiting for her husband, Frederick, who is returning from a reception for his new book. Frederick is a writer of ribald novels. Rose is sitting in a chair with a ball of yarn. She has an old-fashion hairdo (by today?s standards of course.) She is the very picture of sweet domesticity in woman. I am affected. I remember a Twilight Zone episode where Keenan Wynn had this magical sort of tape recorder where he was able to talk into the mike and describe the woman of his dreams and low and behold she would appear. If I had a tape recorder like that I might very well describe Rose (Miranda!) in that chair, with that ball of yarn, with that hairdo, with that sweet face and that sweet disposition. She approaches an ideal of a sort.

 

Alas, she is not so appreciated by Frederick. He enters, mildly intoxicated, and with a little habit of humming no tune in particular that can only be described as annoying as all get out. The discomfort of these two together is obvious despite his clumsy efforts of trying to be nice. When she says, ?Why don?t you write a book that God would like to read,? he elicits a guttural, contemptuous laugh that I would almost describe as disturbing. When she talks about her getaway he agrees so readily that her suspicion that he cares not a whit what she does or for her is vindicated.

 

So Lottie and Rose knock on the door (still in England) of Mr Briggs? (Michael Kitchen) apartments. He is the owner of the villa in Italy and it is he who placed the ad. There is an initial misunderstanding and Mr Briggs tries to close the door?but not before Rose gets a foot in the way. Oh, Rose, good show! How I liked that foot in the door, too funny. The deal is done, the rent money has changed hands, the key to the villa has changed hands, and Rose and Lottie exit the building. Lottie is so dazed at their achievement that she almost gets run down by a van. ?Rose, we?ve done it. We?ve done it!?

 

There is a vastly entertaining scene (and then I?ll stop) when the two girls decide they need more in their party to help defray expenses and they interview Mrs Fisher (Joan Plowright), an older woman who has been around. There are pictures of many people in the room where the interview takes place. ?I knew them all, you know,? she says, including, ?Dr Alfred Tennyson, who pulled my pigtails.? Ditsy Lottie asks, ?Did you know Keats?? who precedes Tennyson rather handily, by a couple of generations in fact. ?Keats?? exclaims Mrs Fisher, ?No, I didn?t! And I didn?t know Chaucer or Shakespeare either.? I thought of that famous Queen of Quip, Marie Dressler, in Dinner at Eight, when, in a smiliar scene someone intimated her advancing age, said with patented Dressler stare and acid tone, ?Well?maybe we should get together sometime and discuss the Civil War.?

 

Everything described here is the first 20 or so minutes. The directing, pacing, and acting (everything) is so superb. There is not one unnecessary frame, a little masterpiece of exposition, really. And there is so much more to come in the story.

 

So?

 

What is my Lottie Wilkins moment?

 

Check this out:

 

ninaph.jpg

 

Okay, so it may not appear as impressive as all that. But wait! This is a replica, built in Argentina, of The Nina, one of the three ships when?

 

In fourteen hundred and ninety two

Columbus sailed the ocean blue.

 

This picture was taken on Feb 10. It is docked in San Diego and is on display until the 15th. For $5 you go on board and look around and talk to the Captain.

 

This young fellow, 20 or 22, is collecting for the tickets and we get to talking. He tells me that he is crew member and gets to sail where e?re it goes. I am amazed that anyone could have a job like that.

 

Methinks I hear an ethereal little jingle.

 

Have I told you how much I love sailing ships, especially these ?old? ones.

 

And so I have The Lottie Wilkins Moment?the widening of the eye, the dropping of the jaw, a faraway glazed look, a palpable longing, and that subtle paralysis in the contemplation?of sailing on that ship?for a living! I?m green with envy as he explains the ship?s upcoming itinerary. From here, they will go to Acapulco, then down to and through the Panama Canal, across the Gulf of Mexico, around the tip of Florida, and then North to Nova Scotia. Am I dreaming or what? Why, I might even give up Miranda in the chair for this!

 

Truth to tell, the ship is very small, the deck area fore and aft is only 66 feet. A view from the rear gives the impression that the ship could easily tip over (but that?s an illusion, I?m sure.) There is a crew of four but in Columbus? day there were 27, a lot of sailors for a vessel this small. It does have a motor. The Coast Guard requires ships of a certain size to have them although I am informed by the Captain that they often shut down the motor and sail. That unsightly coal-black look, as if the ship has survived a fire, is caused by the liberal use of pine tar to preserve the wood. The sun's effect of all the pine tar causes that dark coloring.

 

I wonder how much money I would let go of just to be taken out on that ship for, say, just a few hours, and then back again. That?s probably all that I would up to at the present time. I am not 20 or 22. But that day trip would be fun. It might be as much fun as a month in Italy...in a castle...by the sea.

//

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What a lovely post, mon cher. Thank you for sharing it with us - you are such a good writer! You expressed that longing so perfectly, and gave an entertaining and accurate description of *Enchanted April* as well. I loved the story of your "Lottie Wilkins moment".

 

Have you sailed before? A silly question to ask a buccaneer, but I must know. I picture you with your white shirt billowing in the breeze and the sun shining down on your tanned face as you travel to all points EXCITING......

 

I do wish that Miranda had ditched her awful husband and gone off with Mr. Briggs, or simply stayed on in Italy to become mistress of the villa and her own fate.... She gets the worst of the deal as far as the ladies are concerned, in my opinion. And although Lottie is the catalyst and the seer of the group, and Lady Caroline is the most attractive, and Mrs. Fisher changes the most, my heart just goes to Rose Arbuthnot. Maybe because it seems that she has got the most to escape from? Or maybe because she seems to have the most untapped potential of all the vacationers......

 

Message was edited by: JackFavell

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Thank you, *Jackie*, for your reply. The coincidence of my visit to the Nina and the showing of that movie with "the moment" made me think of writing something, but I was afraid there for awhile that I might have sabotaged my own efforts because what I wrote was so terribly long. Your reply and especially your kind words, therefore, have an especially beneficial effect on me. Thank you for reading and replying.

 

To answer the question, "Have you sailed?," it is necessary to effect an out-of-body experience, of a sort, anyway. I have to take off the Laffite hat, my buccaneer hat, as it were, and once again assume the usual, everyday, boring, old me...and to give out the unhappy truth and say...alas...no. I don't count those early days in the Navy when I did, in fact, "sail" the high seas. I know what it is to have that 360 degree horizon line, day in and day out. But was that really sailing? Sailing is being on a boat that, well, sails, and with real sails too. It's only been recently that I have become interested---no, obsessed at times---with this idea. Not learning to sail, per se, with a small boat of my own, etc., but simply being on one as it braves the swells. I've seen all the history channel stuff on the schooners, pirate ships, Spanish galleons, the whole bit, love to watch those. It really does fascinate to imagine occupying the Nina on an extended voyage, just blows my mind. My lady friend is always urging me to approach one these boat owner's on the marina and try and strike a deal, to go out where land is nowhere to be seen and then return with a land ho! Yippee!

 

--

 

*I picture you with your white shirt billowing in the breeze and the sun shining down on your tanned face as you travel to all points EXCITING......*

 

Oh, you put that so well! So much so, that I get the widening of the eye, the dropping of the jaw, the...well, you know. ;)

 

--

 

I think you have a point there with our sweet Rose. She is my favorite too. And yes, the movie really did a number on us, leading us to believe that a rapprochement between Mr Briggs and Rose was imminent. And yes too, Frederick, though coming around a bit at the end, doesn't really convince that he has made any changes. (After seeming rather horrible at first, Menersh does come across a lot better later on). Isn't it true that when Frederick comes to the villa he is really there to see Caroline and not Rose? He doesn't even know Rose is there. So it's not as if he came for her. And then he has to intercept Caroline at the dinner table to nod and wink the fact that Rose, also sitting at the table, is his wife and for heaven's sake don't spill the beans. Poor Rose, she didn't have a clue.

 

And then we have Mr Briggs, who doesn't see well playing into the idea that he doesn't ogle and he doesn't grab and that this suits Lady Caroline just fine since that is what she is trying to get away from. And then we get the irony of having HER say "I had to grab you," when he nearly falls down a hill with the additional meaning she has made a choice. Still, it's not easy, for me anyway, to see these two as a compatible couple.

 

But you are absolutely right about Rose ... of the three, she, more than the rest, seems to have the "happy" ending that is the least convincing.

 

L

 

//

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My lady friend is always urging me to approach one these boat owner's on the marina and try and strike a deal, to go out where land is nowhere to be seen and then return with a land ho! Yippee!

 

Your lady friend is right!

 

When I was about 14, I thought it would be great to go join the merchant marines..... yikes! I never did, in fact, I only went sailing for the first time about 10 years ago. It's a good thing I never joined up, because I have a tendency toward seasickness...... not horribly, but just enough to make it unpleasant after awhile.

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Mon cher chevalier,

 

Votre mots m'a touch? beaucoup. Recueillez votre courage

des deux mains et "Now, voyager! Sail thou forth to seek and find..."

 

bon voyage,

 

Mlle.G (et Walt Whitman :) )

 

113069.JPG

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laffite,

Your "Lottie Wilkins moment" was very touching indeed. I myself had one such moment a long time ago, and I have never looked back. Life is too short, methinks, not to try out whatever your heart desires at least once.

 

Many happy sailings B-)

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I really loved your Lottie Wilkins post.

 

Ever since I can remember, I've been in love with all things maritime.

I can't explain what it is that appeals to me about it, because I've always thought it ironic that I prefer the safe harbor to the outbound voyage.

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*Jackie*, you wrote, ?Your Lady friend is right,? and indeed she is. Whether I?ll follow through, well, who knows. If I do I may have to exact a few conditions. I will, of course, have to don my Official Laffite Pirate Uniform , complete with white shirt that billows in the wind. And of course I?ll have to have my Laffite sword, (move over, Excalibur). I doubt we will encounter any pirates offshore the San Diego coast but you can never be too careful. Whether or not the Captain will allow me to hold my Laffite machete between my teeth remains to be seen although he may relent when he sees me because I really look good like that. And if I ever get to take this little mini voyage to the three-mile limit and back you can be sure that I?ll be right back here to tell you all about it and bore you to tears.

 

And, ma *chere Deese*, la plus grande, la plus sage, la plus gentille de toutes les deeses du monde, je te remercie mille a mille fois pour etre venu ici pour nous rendre visite et pour avoir me dire de belles choses et aussie bien pour les images et pour la poesie de Monsieur Whitman:

 

THE untold want, by life and land ne?er granted

Now, Voyager, sail thou forth, to seek and find.

 

Je suis tout inspire par ces mots, merci, chere deese,

 

*FilmF*, you urged, ?Many happy sailings,? well, it would be nice to have just one or two. I wonder if I?m now so inspired. You are all putting me to the test here. I may have to give this idea a closer look.

 

And, *Barb*, thanks. I posted a couple of pics on another thread some time ago following similar words from you about your liking for things maritime. I think I posted this one and maybe the one that follows:

 

surprise.jpg

 

 

surpriseph.jpg

 

The San Diego Maritime Museum showcases the HMS Surprise, a replica of the HMS Rose that was originally built in 1757. The replica was was built in 1970 for the Bicentennial but ended up not being used due to under funding. She was used in the movie, Master and Commander, and is now sitting in San Diego showing off her self and to great effect. On days the wind is up a bit and the water a little choppy the ship can rise and dip quite noticeably and there is a little thrill with that if you?re standing on deck.

 

Starph.jpg

 

The other big hit is the Star of India, a ship made of bronze. It sails once a year but stays safely in harbor. I took this picture on such an occasion. This picture was photo shopped to make it look like it is at sea. On these coming out days it is surrounded by many little sail boats and there is a big hullabaloo. I can?t seem to find these pictures right now.

 

L.

lighthousejif.gif

 

//

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Ahoy, matey, from your landlubber who dreams of tall sailing ships and the tang of the salt spray.

 

Yes, now that I can juggle my poor grey matter, I do remember I wrote you about my nautical-loving self, and your great photos -- those were the ones!

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