Sign in to follow this  
mark83

Little Old New York(1923)

24 posts in this topic

No, at least not officially. I have a copy on DVD-R from a now defunct outfit (I think) called FORGOTTEN FILMS. A very nice quality print. Though most of their releases did not look anywhere near as good as this one did. Grapevine Video also has a version on DVD-R, not nearly as sharp of a transfer.

 

UNKNOWN VIDEO has some early Marion Davies features on DVD-R. They are good prints too. ZANDER THE GREAT is a fine print. So is BEAUTY'S WORTH. WHEN KNIGHTHOOD WAS IN FLOWER, doesn't look that great though. Only have half of JANICE MEREIDITH, though the film survives in-tact I think? Didn't they just run LITTLE OLD NEW YORK at the Kansas Silent Film Festival? Were you there? I believe it is actually a 1922 film, not 1923, but I might be getting confused with "KNIGHTHOOD"?

 

I just can't understand why at least a few of Marion's "Public Domain" features, as opposed to though's owned by Warner's are not on DVD in restored prints from company's like Kino, Image, Milestone, or maybe Flicker Alley? Same thing with Colleen Moore, Constance Talmadge, and Marie Prevost.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Check eBay and ask the seller if the print is from Grapevine or Forgotten. You can probably pick it up cheap. I know TCM has a nice clear 35mm print of this film because the clips in their documentaries from it are 100x better quality than any version out there. Even though it is 1923 I do believe the film is public domain because it was Cosmopolitan and they went out of business and probably didn't renew in its 28th year. TCM might have license rights to their nice print however, so if they ever broadcast it and the PD sellers ripped them off TCM probably could sue (though they probably wouldn't, just send a cease and desist letter).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest

Grab this film anywhere you can get it.... It's a terrific historical drama (as Hearst loved to produce for Davies) that shows all sort of real-life people and events in New York City. Lavishly produced and boasting an excellent performance by Davies as she poses as her own dead brother in order to win an inheritance. But she sorta falls for handsome Harrison Ford (the first). The steamboat scenes are great and there's that whipping scene when the Davies boy character is caught setting off a false fire alarm.... Excellent film.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's really odd that TCM does nothing with their nice crisp 35mm print of Little Old, especially given the popularity today of themes where women pretend to be men and men pretend to be women.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Jill,

 

I don't honestly know if Warner' s has a print of LITTLE OLD NEW YORK or not? I will look into it and try to find out. The Real Marion Davies Documentary from 2000, could be misleading in that regard. BEAUTY'S WORTH and some of the others though Cosmopolitan Productions, were actually released by Paramount. I will check on LONY, as I have forgotten who the distributor was. Most likely the best print is at George Eastman House, or UCLA?

 

Hmmm. Looks like LITTLE OLD NEW YORK was a Goldwyn release. I believe that King Vidor's HIS HOUR was as well? Although the distribution might have later been turned over to MGM in it's first year?

 

Wouldn't mind seeing QUALITY STREET in a nice print with a good score either. The Image release just didn't cut it. And as far as I can recall even that version has never been run on TCM?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest

Jill.... I agree. LITTLE OLD NEW YORK was a hit for Marion Davies in 1923, is filled with memorable scenes, and boasts one of Davies' best performances in a silent. Maybe the TCM print lacks a score?

 

The film was the perfect vehicle for Davies, an actress always more at home in comic and character parts than leading lady or romance roles. Hearst got his lavish historical drama and Davies got to play dual roles, which she did in a lot of her silents.

 

The cross-dressing roles were surprisingly popular in the 20s with Davies playing a man/boy in several films including MARIANNE and BEVERLY OF GRAUSTARK and Leatrice Joy in EVE'S LEAVES. There are others.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ed, Jill, Everyone,

 

Here is a quote from Nancy Lorraine on Nitrateville:

 

"LITTLE OLD NEW YORK was just shown at Pordenone last October. It was a 35mm print from the Library of Congress."

 

Nancy

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Everyone,

 

Please note, I seemed to have confused LITTLE OLD NEW YORK with WHEN KNIGHTHOOD WAS IN FLOWER? I have two prints of that film too on DVD-R. One is sharper, and moves at a faster frame-rate. The other is slower moving, and not as clear a transfer. Unfortunately, I do not recall where either of these came from? I have had them for a few years now. I don't think Grapevine has released KNIGHTHOOD, have they?

 

Anyway, the point I am making here is I think allot of people would be very pleased with the Grapevine DVD-R of LITTLE OLD NEW YORK. Don't worry about the Forgotten films print. Contrary to what I said a couple days ago, the Grapevine print is probably a better transfer, and has a pretty good score to go along with it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest

Jeff I know Grapevine has released LITTLE OLD NEW YORK and may still have it on their lists.... not sure about WHEN KNIGHTHOOD WAS IN FLOWER....

 

Both films would be good candidates for restoration but it'll probably never happen.... Marion Davies still has the worst record of any major star of number of films released on DVD....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There are tons of silent stars underrepresented on DVD, but I know what you mean. For a star as wonderful as Marion Davies, a beauty who was also a comediene as well as a great actress, it really is just plain STUPID that TCM hasn't put out a box set for her films, silents and sounds.

 

I still have a slim hope that TCM might pull *Little Old New York* out of mothballs in 35mm and have someone score it. The fellow who did *The Patsy* score did a fine job for them; why not use him again?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest

Well yes... I rate Davies as a MAJOR star of the silent era, plus a good number of her silents exist (admittedly some only in so-so shape). I would think that just on the strength of SHOW PEOPLE and THE PATSY, Davies would rate a DVD set.... THE RED MILL is ready to go, and there are good copies of THE FAIR CO-ED, THE CARDBOARD LOVER, and ZANDER THE GREAT. Maybe it's the usual issue of music tracks? I can never remember.

 

Her three historical epics KNIGHTHOOD, LITTLE OLD NEW YORK, QUALITY STREET, and JANICE MEREDITH are all in good shape, or certainly good enough to restore. I haven't watched BEAUTY'S WORTH in a long while but I remember video quality as ok.

 

Video quality is not so good for the silent MARIANNE, TILLIE THE TOILER, BEVERLY OF GRAUSTARK, and LIGHTS OF OLD BROADWAY but again I have copies of copies of copies.

 

Message was edited by: drednm

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I would be pleased if they even put a small box set out with one or two silents like *The Patsy* and *The Red Mill* and then the rest sound films like *Marianne* (which is better than the silent version, imo) which they easily could transfer to disc with no problems whatsoever. Just put *something* out! If they did it for Chaney and Garbo and Keaton they can easily do it for Marion Davies. Like you say, the first two silents are ready to go with scores and the sound films just need to be transferred. Get something out and build the interest in her (which would happen naturally once people got the chance to see her - what's not to love?) and then later put out another set when more silents are ready to go.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest

I agree... and maybe that would spur enough interest to get YOLANDA and IT'S A WISE CHILD out of whatever legal limbos they are in.....

 

And funny how rumors surface now and again that the 1918 CECILIA OF THE PINK ROSES exists....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ed,

 

So does anyone know if ADAM AND EVA (1923) still exists?

 

Jill,

 

I'm somewhat surprised that you liked the Vivek Madalla score to THE PATSY as well as you did. Allot of people have told me that much of this sounded like elevator music to them. I like portions of it, but would still like to hear the Maud Neilissen score done for Photoplay Productions that we never get to see in this country, if at all possible.

 

I had a link to a clip, and will see if I can find it again. Ah here it is. I think? I wish that the clip was longer, because you can't really evaluate the music very well as brief as it is.

 

 

 

http://www.maudnelissen.com/Patsy.html

 

 

 

 

 

I personally thought that Michael Picton's music for THE RED MILL was great, though very different from Victor Herbert. If Warner's is really working on a King Vidor collection. THE PATSY, and SHOW PEOPLE are likely to both be included. Not sure which music that they will use for SHOW PEOPLE, Axt-Mendoza, or Carl Davis?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest

never heard anything abut ADAM AND EVA still being with us....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well if it's elevator music, Jeffrey, it's FUN elevator music. ;)

 

I must admit when I heard the first few musical phrases for *The Patsy* I rolled my eyes and thought, "Oh no, we're in for it now", but that score has really grown on me and now I can't imagine any other score for it but that one. It just wouldn't be the same movie to me. He wrote funny music but he also wrote a very lovely romantic tune that popped up a few times -- like when they are on the floor looking at the map of his development -- and I'm a sucker for a romantic melody.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Growing up on the Gold Coast of Long Island there were mansions all around us. Across the street from my home there was a huge three story mansion that was used for at least two movies that I know of - *The Group* and *Little Gloria, Happy At Last* (I watched that being filmed and got to meet Christopher Plummer, who signed autographs before a helicopter landed on the property and took him away).

 

I used to babysit the owner's children all the time. They had a kitchen that looks JUST like that kitchen in that picture. And the maids' quarters were right around it and above it on the next floor. That photo brought back a flood of memories.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Jill,

 

I'll concur that the Madalla's score (am I spelling his name correctly?), grew on me as well. There are portions that I think are very good. But it is not very 1920's like. Yes, there are some good romantic themes, no question.

 

Here is what Harold Aherne said on Nitrateville about surviving Marion Davies features just the other day. Most of Marion's career is still with us. I only wish Colleen Moore had this much of her work still around.

 

 

 

*"I once calculated Marion's percentage of surviving films, and it came to 87% including the talkies, although several are incomplete. Looking through various AMS posts, I found out more specific info--*

 

*The following appear to be lost: Runaway Romany from 1917, Cecilia of the Pink Roses and The Burden of Proof from 1918, The Dark Star and The Cinema Murder from 1919, and The Young Diana from 1922.*

 

*At least the following are held at LOC:*

*The Belle of New York (1919) incomplete*

*Getting Mary Married (1919) incomplete*

*The Restless Sex (1920) incomplete, also at Gosfilmofond, length unknown*

*Buried Treasure (1921) incomplete*

*Enchantment (1921)*

*The Bride's Play (1921)*

*When Knighthood Was in Flower (1922)*

*Beverly of Graustark (1926)*

 

*MOMA has:*

*Yolanda (1924)*

*Zander the Great (1925)*

 

*Beauty's Worth (1922), Little Old New York (1923), and Janice Meredith (1924) all exist, although I haven't confirmed which at archive(s).*

 

*I've read that April Folly (1920) and Adam and Eva (1923) survive, but I haven't heard much about them, and the latter may be incomplete. I believe all of Marion's films from 1923 onward exist, although I doubt that anything remains of her aborted 1928 musical The Five O'Clock Girl; does anyone know more?*

 

*-Harold"*

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The way I look at it though it doesn't have to be 1920's style music because the story of *The Patsy* is timeless and universal. Sibling rivalry, parents choosing one child over another in their affections, stress in the marriage because of it, sisters vying for the same men, stuff like that went on in the 1920's and it goes on in today's families. So if you look at it that way the music fits because it suits the quirkiness yet universality of the story.

 

A bunch of 1920's music would just be a bunch of 1920's music, not necessarily reflecting the characters or storyline.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

New Members:

Register Here

Learn more about the new message boards:

FAQ

Having problems?

Contact Us