SunAndMoon

Tyrone Power

72 posts in this topic

13 minutes ago, Sgt_Markoff said:

Oh I certainly agree that taken in context, Rathbone knew his topic (fencing). My quibble is just that his statements lend themselves too readily to Hollywood backbiting.

A former crony of mine was heavily involved with swordfight choreography; all these nuances have been aired many times on other forums and that's why I haven't bothered to restate the plain and obvious such as Rathbone's expertise. I'm just focusing on what I thought was a good point you made, namely that Rathbone's approval or disapproval in itself, ought not always be blandly accepted outright.

By the way my fave flick with Flynn and Rathbone together is 'Dawn Patrol'. No swords at all. They are finally on par with each other there and demonstrate some good chemistry.

Yeh, I'm a Dawn Patrol fan, as well, with Flynn, Rathbone and Niven all giving outstanding accounts of themselves. Rathbone brings a neurotic edge to his commanding officer on the verge of a crackup from the pressures of command, and it's wonderful to see Flynn's transformation from devil-may-care to nervous intensity once he assumes command of the post.

The scene in which a suddenly gleeful Rathbone hands over command of the post to a stunned Flynn who can't believe his ears is one of my favourites.

rathbone-and-flynn.jpg

Of course, since this is a Power thread, it should be mentioned that he and Flynn would be co-starred at the end of their careers in The Sun Also Rises, with Ty getting top billing and Errol in support. That film gave Flynn a brief career comeback.

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On 10/19/2018 at 5:29 PM, Dargo said:

Tom, I think your very use of the word "elegant" in the above is pretty much why SunAndMoon made the comment that they did about Errol and Tyrone.

More or less, yes. I'm very bad at explanations, but I'll try and explain what I meant.

Errol Flynn and Tyrone Power don't look like how you expect action heroes to look. They're not rugged or muscular like Cary Grant, or Harrison Ford, or Gerard Butler. They're more slender, more refined facially, and, yes, more graceful--an adjective typically associated with women. Like Leslie Howard, or Elvis Presley, or, to use a more contemporary example, Harry Styles. (Yeah, I know. The ultimate insult, comparing someone to an ex-boybander. I swear I mean all of this in the most complimentary way possible.)

They're not any less masculine for it. It's just a different kind of masculinity.

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21 hours ago, TomJH said:

Of course, since this is a Power thread, it should be mentioned that he and Flynn would be co-starred at the end of their careers in The Sun Also Rises, with Ty getting top billing and Errol in support.

A.k.a. the only memorable thing about that movie. Well, Errol's hilarious in it, but...yeah, still unmemorable.

There's something intensely emotional about watching two of your first crushes smile at each other and salute each other a la Johnny Depp in Pirates of the Caribbean.

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On 10/20/2018 at 6:56 AM, TomJH said:

Rathbone's opinion has weight, I feel, because he was generally renowned as the best fencer on the screen at the time (he fenced as a hobby) and neither Power nor Flynn ever looked better in their screen duels than when they faced him (in Zorro and Robin Hood, respectively).

But, having said that, as you stated, Sarge, he was human and who is to say with certainty that a prejudice or spite of some kind did not influence his statement about the fencing abilities of the two actors. I question the statement because of the fencing performances by Power and Flynn in their non-Rathbone films. Flynn is simply more impressive, in my opinion.

Having said that, Flynn, who was always quite modest about his film achievements, never claimed that he was a good fencer. He said he knew how to look good with a sword in his hand.

Looking back on those two beautifully choreographed duels that Rathbone had with the two, you have to wonder how much weight all three actors lost in their rehearsals for the duels, as well as the final product appearing on the screen. All three actors had reason to be proud when they looked back upon their fencing performances in these two films.

The-Mark-of-Zorro.png

Robin+Hood+Sword++duel+2.jpg

 

P.S.: By the way, Sarge, in case you missed it, there was a review of your performance in Beau Geste in the I Just Watched thread a couple of days ago.

 

All of this discussion about Basil Rathbone as a fencer takes me back to my high school days. And in those days I was mad about Basil as Sherlock Holmes.

As a teenager, I used to get the biggest kick then out of watching Basil fence with Tyrone Power or Errol Flynn and always lose. To me it was hilarious because I knew he was far superior to either one of them.

It was also confusing to me that he wasn't a bigger star.

 

But I have to admit years later I found out that Tyrone Power was quite a stage actor, as well as Basil Rathbone.

 I have to give Tyrone Power Credit--

 even though he was a tremendously big movie star he still had the desire, the ability and the courage to appear on stage whenever had the time.

The stage separates the movie stars from the actors.

 The old-time Hollywood studio recruiters knew what they were getting when they hired Broadway actors and actresses like Katharine Hepburn, Spencer Tracy, Humphrey Bogart, Bette Davis, Leslie Howard, or Miriam Hopkins et al. And they were never disappointed.

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On 8/13/2018 at 2:19 PM, arpirose said:

Always wondered why he died so young at just 44, Flynn was a huge partier, but not Power?

There was a genetic component with his massive coronary.  His father died at about the same age with the same condition.  Perhaps, with advances in Medicine, his life would have been prolonged.  But, that is pure speculation.

I will also add, the first Tyrone Power, William Grattan Tyrone Power (1797 - 1841) died at age 44 too (what are the chances of that happening??). Many years ago I read a really interesting biography about the first Power, will have to look up the title, I knew who he was, as some forget there are 3 Tyrone Power actors in the family lineage, up to the present one spoken about.

As for the Tyrone Power of the present subject, he was quite gorgeous, I think he had potential but was also underused. Personally I liked him in "Witness for the Prosecution" and "The Black Rose".

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I just finished watching Nightmare Alley. I am not joking when I say that I had to lie down and wait for my nerves to glue themselves back together before I was calm enough to think (and type) clearly. I'm still shaking a little bit.

I have a few minor complaints. First, the movie didn't end so much as it just stopped. Second, I was expecting the Hanged Man card to show up again after Stanton's fall from grace, and it didn't. You want a motif, you've got to carry it all the way through. Third, the Death card does not signify actual death. (Though it does signify change, which is what happened, so same difference.)

But Ty lived up to his surname, as usual, so I'm not unhappy, just screwed up. That movie messes with your head, sort of like its main character. Adrenaline rush doesn't begin to cover it. 

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Any fan of Tyrone Power simply must view him in 'Abandon Ship!'. A role not as well-known as many of his others but its among his best work. And one of the greatest maritime movies ever. Its my personal favorite of all his films. Power really does have a superb filmography but this one stands out to me. Co-starring Stephen Boyd. What more could you ask?

p.s. NO, its not a lifeboat noir!!! :angry:

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17 hours ago, SunAndMoon said:

I just finished watching Nightmare Alley. I am not joking when I say that I had to lie down and wait for my nerves to glue themselves back together before I was calm enough to think (and type) clearly. I'm still shaking a little bit.

I have a few minor complaints. First, the movie didn't end so much as it just stopped. Second, I was expecting the Hanged Man card to show up again after Stanton's fall from grace, and it didn't. You want a motif, you've got to carry it all the way through. Third, the Death card does not signify actual death. (Though it does signify change, which is what happened, so same difference.)

But Ty lived up to his surname, as usual, so I'm not unhappy, just screwed up. That movie messes with your head, sort of like its main character. Adrenaline rush doesn't begin to cover it. 

Nightmare Alley was a great film.  It's one of my favorite of the Fox Film Noirs.  I especially liked Joan Blondell, Coleen Gray and Helen Walker.  I loved this movie because it was so delightfully creepy. 

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Re: Tyrone Power's early death.  He died of a heart attack, as did his father.  I am wondering if it was hereditary? 

I do like Tyrone Power, but I haven't seen many of his films.  I've seen Nightmare Alley, Alexander's Ragtime Band and The Sun Also Rises

I have some films of his recorded: The Eddy Duchin Story, The Mask of Zorro, The Rains Came, and Blood and Sand.  I also picked up The Razor's Edge at some point, but haven't watched it yet. 

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1 hour ago, speedracer5 said:

Re: Tyrone Power's early death.  He died of a heart attack, as did his father.  I am wondering if it was hereditary? 

I do like Tyrone Power, but I haven't seen many of his films.  I've seen Nightmare Alley, Alexander's Ragtime Band and The Sun Also Rises

I have some films of his recorded: The Eddy Duchin Story, The Mask of Zorro, The Rains Came, and Blood and Sand.  I also picked up The Razor's Edge at some point, but haven't watched it yet. 

All those Power films you have recorded are worth viewing, Speedy.

But since you're a Flynn fan you might be particularly interested in The Mark of Zorro to compare Power as a swashbuckler to Flynn. Not only does the film have a magnificent, fast paced duel with Basil Rathbone, but Ty is extraordinarily effective playing Don Diego, fop by day, and Zorro, masked avenger of the common folk by night.

As you're watching you might also speculate how Errol would have fared in the same role. Could he have pulled off the fop scenes? We'll never know but Power certainly does, and he does so with a subtle humour that is most delightful.

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1 hour ago, TomJH said:

All those Power films you have recorded are worth viewing, Speedy.

But since you're a Flynn fan you might be particularly interested in The Mark of Zorro to compare Power as a swashbuckler to Flynn. Not only does the film have a magnificent, fast paced duel with Basil Rathbone, but Ty is extraordinarily effective playing Don Diego, fop by day, and Zorro, masked avenger of the common folk by night.

As you're watching you might also speculate how Errol would have fared in the same role. Could he have pulled off the fop scenes? We'll never know but Power certainly does, and he does so with a subtle humour that is most delightful.

I don't think Flynn could have pulled off the fop masquerade.  Contrary to those who say Flynn, compared to action heroes of today, comes off as "effeminate," I think he's much too innately masculine.  I'm a Power fan, too, but feel that Flynn just exudes masculine sex appeal.  I also think that Flynn had a certain insecurity (if you've read is autobiography and biographies on him, you'll see this) which may have prevented him from taking on that type of role early in his career.  Flynn was also more of a "studio product"; I think Warner's had a lot to say about his image.  Power's playing at effeminacy fairly early in his career is a fairly big risk as an actor, and Nightmare Alley was another risk, taken fairly early in his career.  His early death was truly a loss of someone who could have been recognized as one of America's finest actors if his career continued.  I believe that the heart attack was definitely from a hereditary condition.  I wouldn't even chalk it up to smoking.  Our favorite fencer/villain, Basil Rathbone, was often photographed on set with a ciggie hanging from his lip, and he managed to stay active until a fairly ripe old age.  

 

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On 12/9/2018 at 6:40 AM, Sgt_Markoff said:

Any fan of Tyrone Power simply must view him in 'Abandon Ship!'. A role not as well-known as many of his others but its among his best work. And one of the greatest maritime movies ever. Its my personal favorite of all his films. Power really does have a superb filmography but this one stands out to me. Co-starring Stephen Boyd. What more could you ask?

p.s. NO, its not a lifeboat noir!!! :angry:

I'll keep an eye out for it.

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15 hours ago, rosebette said:

I don't think Flynn could have pulled off the fop masquerade.  Contrary to those who say Flynn, compared to action heroes of today, comes off as "effeminate," I think he's much too innately masculine.  I'm a Power fan, too, but feel that Flynn just exudes masculine sex appeal.  I also think that Flynn had a certain insecurity (if you've read is autobiography and biographies on him, you'll see this) which may have prevented him from taking on that type of role early in his career.  Flynn was also more of a "studio product"; I think Warner's had a lot to say about his image.  Power's playing at effeminacy fairly early in his career is a fairly big risk as an actor, and Nightmare Alley was another risk, taken fairly early in his career.  His early death was truly a loss of someone who could have been recognized as one of America's finest actors if his career continued.  I believe that the heart attack was definitely from a hereditary condition.  I wouldn't even chalk it up to smoking.  Our favorite fencer/villain, Basil Rathbone, was often photographed on set with a ciggie hanging from his lip, and he managed to stay active until a fairly ripe old age.  

 

Power was five years younger than Flynn. In viewing Power's late '30s films (In Old Chicago or Lloyds of London, for example) he exudes a boyishness in appearance and manner that Flynn lacked during that same time period.

Take a look at Power in Alexander's Ragtime or, perhaps even more so, Marie Antoinette (where he really seems like a callow youth), as opposed to the maturity of Flynn's appearance in Robin Hood, Four's a Crowd or The Dawn Patrol, all made the same year. To me one is a male just edging past his teenage years while the other is a more adult man.

Even as late as 1939 and the early scenes in Jesse James Ty comes across as quite boyish, while Flynn (look at Dodge City, made the same year) is clearly a mature male in his late '20s.

As an actor I've always felt that Power demonstrated a more skillful and nuanced performance in The Mark of Zorro than he had in any of his previous work. He's clearly still a young man but that boyishness that had been so much a part of his '30s work (part of his appeal for some while, for me, perhaps a bit alienating) had disappeared. He's now demonstrating the same kind of maturity in both appearance and performance that Flynn had had on display for a few years on screen.

Power was a man with an acting heritage and stage background, who took his craft very seriously, while Flynn had been a young roughneck living by his wits (and skirting the law in the process, on occasion) in New Guinea and Australia. Flynn's adventurous life, which included interacting with fellow roughnecks (he always liked the company of hardened, carousing stunt men during his Hollywood years) had played a major role in the formation of his character.

I think that because of their contrasting pre-Hollywood backgrounds Power can be described as "softer" than Flynn, both physically as well as in personality (though Errol, of course, still had great charm and even a physical elegance when he was young). That "softness" in Power undoubtedly assisted him in his foppish scenes in Zorro (not to mention Ty's delicious subtle wit in those sequences, as well).

For the reasons stated above regarding Flynn, I can see why some would think those same scenes might have been more of a challenge for him to pull off. But Flynn was also a complex man who was an avid reader of, among others, G. K. Chesterton. He indulged off screen in some "Old boy" and "My dear sport" salutations of people at times, inspired by the author's books, that made some of his roughneck drinking buddies in Hollywood wonder, at times, about his sexuality. Flynn also liked to carry a cane and smoke his cigarettes through a silver cigarette holder, affecting the mannerisms of an aristocract that had nothing to do with his background.

Could Errol have used aspects of his literary knowledge of Chesterton characters to give a convincingly foppish portrayal? It would have been a different approach than Power's, I suspect. My money's on Errol but, of course, we'll never know. Can't you just see macho Rathbone sneering at him as Errol, with a cigarette holder in his mouth, calls him "My dear boy"?

But you're right, rosebette, about Warners concern in promoting Flynn's macho appeal so the studio may well have been reluctant to experiment with Flynn's image by indulging in scenes of that nature. For that reason Fox is to be commended for allowing Ty Power to do them, especially since those scenes allowed the actor to demonstrate a previously largely hidden subtle humorous technique in the process.

5a2bd356e7650c181ef776872cbcfc08.jpg

 

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They were like night and day. Flynn was all about the flashiness and charisma, but there was something more subtle and much darker in Power. There were hints of it even in his more traditionally heroic roles, and he got to bring it out in films like Nightmare Alley and Witness for the Prosecution. Flynn wasn't all style and no substance as an actor, either, but he possessed invigorating energy instead of Power's dark magnetism. They complemented each other. I think that's why I love both men so much, and why I could never choose one of them over the other.

And who thinks Ty should've co-starred with Linda Darnell more often? They had some really nice chemistry together, maybe not Errol-and-Olivia levels, but still great.

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I like Power and Darnell together very much but it was really only The Mark of Zorro that gave them the right material so they could really shine as a screen pairing, I feel. Their other three films together didn't give them the same opportunities.

The scene below set in a church, romantic but also performed with a gentle sense of humour, is one of their best in the film.

u-g-Q1C1WO10.jpg?w=550&h=550&p=0

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17 minutes ago, TomJH said:

I like Power and Darnell together very much but it was really only The Mark of Zorro that gave them the right material so they could really shine as a screen pairing, I feel. Their other three films together didn't give them the same opportunities.

The scene below set in a church, romantic but also performed with a gentle sense of humour, is one of their best in the film.

u-g-Q1C1WO10.jpg?w=550&h=550&p=0

That scene saved my seventeen-year-old soul.

...Wait. Three other films? What?

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10 minutes ago, SunAndMoon said:

That scene saved my seventeen-year-old soul.

...Wait. Three other films? What?

Daytime Wife, a minor 1939 romantic comedy, Brigham Young 1940, in which they are cast as a bland couple, and Blood and Sand 1941, in which vamp Rita Hayworth steals the limelight from good, faithful wife Darnell.

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11 minutes ago, TomJH said:

Blood and Sand 1941, in which vamp Rita Hayworth steals the limelight from good, faithful wife Darnell.

Oh, I don't know about that. I thought Rita's character was the bland one! 

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10 minutes ago, SunAndMoon said:

Oh, I don't know about that. I thought Rita's character was the bland one! 

I suspect most people find screen "bad" girls more interesting than virtuous ones.

Rita_Hayworth_and_Tyrone_Power_in_Blood_

Darnell's career would get more interesting when she started to play "bad" girls, though that takes nothing away from her charming performance in The Mark of Zorro.

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Was it true, all that stuff about Ty wanting to be in an accident that would wreck his face? I mean, I know he said he did, but I don't know if that was a one-time thing or if he was genuinely as miserable as his IMDb page made him out to be.

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