SunAndMoon

Tyrone Power

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When I was fourteen, I arrogantly believed that I would never have a crush on a celebrity. I was too intellectual for that. Such things were beneath me.

Little did I know I'd be forced to eat my words three years later. It was humiliating, but more rewarding than I ever dreamed.

Two years after said word-eating, the more of Tyrone's movies I watch, the more I appreciate him as an actor, and the more he makes my heart ache. I can't help but wonder if he eventually would have gotten the kind of roles he wanted, had he lived. He had both looks and talent, but felt that one was constantly overlooked in favor of the other. I feel sorry for him. I really do.

I don't know if any of this makes sense. I just wish his story had a happier ending.

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When I think of Tyrone Power I think of largely unrealized potential as an actor.

He was magnificent in The Mark of Zorro, not only for the excitement that he brought to the screen with his swashbuckling presence (including his participation with Rathbone in one of the great screen duels) but also for the sly, sophisticated touch he brought to the film's moments of humour portraying Don Diego as effeminate.

Yet none of Power's followup swashbucklers satisfied nearly as much as this one, his first foray into the genre.

After the war Power's casting against type in Nightmare Alley resulted in what many consider the performance of his career, as the amoral ambitious carnival hustler who uses his looks and charm to take advantage of others. Power is quite magnificent in a slimy role.

But there were no dramatically challenging followups as Fox then cast him in a series of largely bland comedies/dramas/adventure melos in which the actor largely just went through the motions and hardly seemed inspired. It must have been discouraging to Power to have succeeded so well when finally given a strong dramatic role in Nightmare Alley (which died at the box office) only to then find himself stuck in mundane material like The Black Rose, American Guerilla in the Philippines and Pony Soldier.

Then, suddenly, after a series of uninspirational years, the early doldrum '50s, for him, Power was given the opportunity to demonstrate his dramatic skills in John Ford's The Long Gray Line. Aging on screen with a credible Irish brogue, this Mr. Chips at West Point drama allowed the actor considerable range as a performer, and he did well in it.

After that came some impressive work, with the sentimental The Eddy Duchin Story and a particularly strong gritty dramatic performance in the stark Abandon Ship. The Sun Also Rises may have been a bit of a dull misfire for Power but right after that came his sly, ambiguous performance as the murder suspect in Witness for the Prosecution, one of the big hits of 1957.

Clearly Power's career was once again on an upswing, having just delivered four of his best performances in the previous three years. Then, shockingly, at age 44, came a heart attack death on the Spanish set of Solomon and Sheba. The timing seemed so cruel, not just because of his age (though, chain smoker that he was, his appearance had been starting to look a bit haggard) but because he was finally starting to get some respect for his acting skills in roles that were not of the matinee idol variety.

As I said at the beginning about Power, a profound sense of largely unrealized potential.

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Always wondered why he died so young at just 44, Flynn was a huge partier, but not Power?

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His son tried an acting career & was in COCOON (l985)

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Perhaps my favorite Tyrone Power film is "THE RAZOR'S EDGE".   Of course Power was almost excruciatingly handsome and sometimes it was hard to see past that.  But in this film one was compelled to ignore the physical and appreciate   the truly sensitive and accomplished actor he really was.

 

 

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My favorite performance of Tyrone's is in WITNESS FOR THE PROSECUTION, as the accused Leonard Vole.

He really makes you sympathetic to his character....and then....

Charles Laughton's turn as his defense attorney is also one of my favorites as well. And Marlene Dietrich really has you scratching your head. But that's what I love about this movie. It's where nobody personally involved with the case is who they seem to be.

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I think my favorite Tyrone Power performance is an early one: Lloyd's of London. Interesting that although he is definitely the lead, he does not get top billing on the credits, which read:

Starring

Freddie Bartholomew

and

Madeleine Carroll

with

Sir Guy Standing

Tyrone Power

C. Aubrey Smith

Virginia Field

lloyds-of-london-62.jpg?w=800

 

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Always wondered why he died so young at just 44, Flynn was a huge partier, but not Power?

There was a genetic component with his massive coronary.  His father died at about the same age with the same condition.  Perhaps, with advances in Medicine, his life would have been prolonged.  But, that is pure speculation.

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1 hour ago, spence said:

Always wondered why he died so young at just 44, Flynn was a huge partier, but not Power?

Power was a smoker. His father died of a heart attack, so there may have been a hereditary problem as well.  Power had been complaining about pain in his left arm and abdomen for a few days, while filming Solomon and Sheba. When he stopped filming a duel scene with George Sanders, he said "I've got to stop, I don't feel well." Contemporaneous accounts mention that he even lit a cigarette before heading to his dressing room.

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1 hour ago, scsu1975 said:

Power was a smoker. His father died of a heart attack, so there may have been a hereditary problem as well.  Power had been complaining about pain in his left arm and abdomen for a few days, while filming Solomon and Sheba. When he stopped filming a duel scene with George Sanders, he said "I've got to stop, I don't feel well." Contemporaneous accounts mention that he even lit a cigarette before heading to his dressing room.

In March, 1958 Power had a physical examination, as requested by insurers, but when the cardiologist requested that he take a second cardiogram the actor refused, concerned that his future as an actor would be imperiled if something was wrong.

Power said, "If there is something wrong, I don't want to know."

Ironically, a few months before leaving for Spain Power filmed a commercial for the American Heart Association.

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1 hour ago, TomJH said:

 

Ironically, a few months before leaving for Spain Power filmed a commercial for the American Heart Association.

The film was released in February 1959, with a prologue and epilogue added by David Niven.

Xks4d88.png

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1 hour ago, TomJH said:

In March, 1958 Power had a physical examination, as requested by insurers, but when the cardiologist requested that he take a second cardiogram the actor refused, concerned that his future as an actor would be imperiled if something was wrong.

Power said, "If there is something wrong, I don't want to know."

Ironically, a few months before leaving for Spain Power filmed a commercial for the American Heart Association.

That's messed up.

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     I liked Tyrone Power and found him a great actor in all genres. Tyrone and Robert Taylor were both extremely handsome men but I find Tyrone to be a much better actor than Taylor. He was more believable in his roles.

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If Tyrone had been diagnosed with severe coronary issues, no company would have insured him and that would have meant no one would hire him for films. Probably not an unusual fear most actors had. When Tyrone was filming Solomon and Sheba, George Sanders dueling scenes with Tyrone had to be done over and over, some reports say that the scenes had to done over 20 times. Sanders was no swordsmen, Tyrone was considered to be one of the best. In fact Basil Rathbone said Tyrone was a far better swordsman than Errol.The swords were heavy that were used. There's no doubt that heart disease ran in Tyrone's family and he smoked, however the attack might not have been so massive had he not had to do so many of those repeated dueling scenes with Sanders.

I think Tyrone wanting to do ads for the Heart Association was admirable. He may not have saved his own life but may have saved many other lives with those ads. It's easy to judge but when faced with becoming uninsured and the prospect of losing his career and livelihood, unfortunately many would have done the same thing. Tyrone was a great actor, a gorgeous man and it was a great loss to his family, his many friends and fans and to films when he died.
 

 

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10 minutes ago, TomJH said:

 

If I remember correctly, this was from an episode of "That's Hollywood," which I used to watch often. I do recall this episode.

Now this is creepy, but in some of those scenes, George Sanders looks a little like Tyrone Power's father, Frederick Tyrone Power.

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No doubt Power was a gorgeous, handsome man, but his looks do not appeal to my taste at all. But I find him an excellent actor, and always believe his character on screen.

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Watched him the other night on TCM in "The Rains Came". Not only was he handsomer than ever, but his acting was really quite good as was his co-star George Brent who surprised me because in most of Brent's prior performances he kind of blended in with the scenery.

Of course the real star of that film was the venerable Wolman-predictor herself,  Maria Ouspenskaya.

"Bevare de mahk uff de Vulvfman!"

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17 minutes ago, Zea said:

Watched him the other night on TCM in "The Rains Came". Not only was he handsomer than ever, but his acting was really quite good as was his co-star George Brent who surprised me because in most of Brent's prior performances he kind of blended in with the scenery.

Of course the real star of that film was the venerable Wolman-predictor herself,  Maria Ouspenskaya.

"Bevare de mahk uff de Vulvfman!"

The real star of The Rains Came, in my opinion, is the special effects, which still dazzle.

Power may look like a "copper Apollo" but he is hardly convincing in his role. I agree, however, that George Brent is very good.

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On 8/13/2018 at 1:24 PM, Zea said:

Perhaps my favorite Tyrone Power film is "THE RAZOR'S EDGE".   Of course Power was almost excruciatingly handsome and sometimes it was hard to see past that.  But in this film one was compelled to ignore the physical and appreciate   the truly sensitive and accomplished actor he really was.

 

 

I love his voice and diction. This clip you posted reminds me of these videos I randomly encountered on YouTube and I find them so relaxing and pleasing to listen to.

I've adored him for years and it seems like the more I read about him, the sadder I get. He seemed to be a very generous yet driven man. My favorite thing about him is that he always worked to improve himself and his skills and aimed to the greatest actor he could be. I visited his grave in June and it was a very moving experience.

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On ‎8‎/‎13‎/‎2018 at 12:36 PM, TomJH said:

When I think of Tyrone Power I think of largely unrealized potential as an actor.

He was magnificent in The Mark of Zorro, not only for the excitement that he brought to the screen with his swashbuckling presence (including his participation with Rathbone in one of the great screen duels) but also for the sly, sophisticated touch he brought to the film's moments of humour portraying Don Diego as effeminate.

Yet none of Power's followup swashbucklers satisfied nearly as much as this one, his first foray into the genre.

After the war Power's casting against type in Nightmare Alley resulted in what many consider the performance of his career, as the amoral ambitious carnival hustler who uses his looks and charm to take advantage of others. Power is quite magnificent in a slimy role.

But there were no dramatically challenging followups as Fox then cast him in a series of largely bland comedies/dramas/adventure melos in which the actor largely just went through the motions and hardly seemed inspired. It must have been discouraging to Power to have succeeded so well when finally given a strong dramatic role in Nightmare Alley (which died at the box office) only to then find himself stuck in mundane material like The Black Rose, American Guerilla in the Philippines and Pony Soldier.

Then, suddenly, after a series of uninspirational years, the early doldrum '50s, for him, Power was given the opportunity to demonstrate his dramatic skills in John Ford's The Long Gray Line. Aging on screen with a credible Irish brogue, this Mr. Chips at West Point drama allowed the actor considerable range as a performer, and he did well in it.

After that came some impressive work, with the sentimental The Eddy Duchin Story and a particularly strong gritty dramatic performance in the stark Abandon Ship. The Sun Also Rises may have been a bit of a dull misfire for Power but right after that came his sly, ambiguous performance as the murder suspect in Witness for the Prosecution, one of the big hits of 1957.

Clearly Power's career was once again on an upswing, having just delivered four of his best performances in the previous three years. Then, shockingly, at age 44, came a heart attack death on the Spanish set of Solomon and Sheba. The timing seemed so cruel, not just because of his age (though, chain smoker that he was, his appearance had been starting to look a bit haggard) but because he was finally starting to get some respect for his acting skills in roles that were not of the matinee idol variety.

As I said at the beginning about Power, a profound sense of largely unrealized potential.

Most movie history books always include NIGYTMARE ALLEY as his finest overall performance

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On ‎8‎/‎13‎/‎2018 at 1:24 PM, Zea said:

Perhaps my favorite Tyrone Power film is "THE RAZOR'S EDGE".   Of course Power was almost excruciatingly handsome and sometimes it was hard to see past that.  But in this film one was compelled to ignore the physical and appreciate   the truly sensitive and accomplished actor he really was.

 

 

1946's version was also always among R. OSBORNE'S top ten  I I also ask this one who else ever saw the 1984 Bill Murray version? I gave it (**) myself

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Also keep inquiring as to whom knows why he died so young???  Flynn-(a better actor) all know why he went at only age 50 in '59, but why Power?

 

His grave benmch that says "Good Night Sweet Prince" located in HOLLYWOOD FOREVER, CEM still there of course &I got a couple pix of it-(it's the p[ark/cem that borders old RKO & Paramount & motel I was lucky enough to stay at on all (3) journeys to whats barely left nowadays of OLD HOLLYWOOD is located almost a stone's throw away

 

 

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On 8/13/2018 at 11:36 AM, TomJH said:

When I think of Tyrone Power I think of largely unrealized potential as an actor.

He was magnificent in The Mark of Zorro, not only for the excitement that he brought to the screen with his swashbuckling presence (including his participation with Rathbone in one of the great screen duels) but also for the sly, sophisticated touch he brought to the film's moments of humour portraying Don Diego as effeminate.

Yet none of Power's followup swashbucklers satisfied nearly as much as this one, his first foray into the genre.

After the war Power's casting against type in Nightmare Alley resulted in what many consider the performance of his career, as the amoral ambitious carnival hustler who uses his looks and charm to take advantage of others. Power is quite magnificent in a slimy role.

But there were no dramatically challenging followups as Fox then cast him in a series of largely bland comedies/dramas/adventure melos in which the actor largely just went through the motions and hardly seemed inspired. It must have been discouraging to Power to have succeeded so well when finally given a strong dramatic role in Nightmare Alley (which died at the box office) only to then find himself stuck in mundane material like The Black Rose, American Guerilla in the Philippines and Pony Soldier.

Then, suddenly, after a series of uninspirational years, the early doldrum '50s, for him, Power was given the opportunity to demonstrate his dramatic skills in John Ford's The Long Gray Line. Aging on screen with a credible Irish brogue, this Mr. Chips at West Point drama allowed the actor considerable range as a performer, and he did well in it.

After that came some impressive work, with the sentimental The Eddy Duchin Story and a particularly strong gritty dramatic performance in the stark Abandon Ship. The Sun Also Rises may have been a bit of a dull misfire for Power but right after that came his sly, ambiguous performance as the murder suspect in Witness for the Prosecution, one of the big hits of 1957.

Clearly Power's career was once again on an upswing, having just delivered four of his best performances in the previous three years. Then, shockingly, at age 44, came a heart attack death on the Spanish set of Solomon and Sheba. The timing seemed so cruel, not just because of his age (though, chain smoker that he was, his appearance had been starting to look a bit haggard) but because he was finally starting to get some respect for his acting skills in roles that were not of the matinee idol variety.

As I said at the beginning about Power, a profound sense of largely unrealized potential.

I recently watched him in 1941's A Yank in the RAF with Betty Grable and John Sutton and really enjoyed it.  A gem of a forgotten film.

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