Bethluvsfilms

Finally saw CITIZEN KANE on DVD last night...

60 posts in this topic

On 8/24/2018 at 2:05 PM, CaveGirl said:

But do you REALLY know what Rosebud meant, besides the sled iconography?

Hmmm...

Yes. Everyone knows. Move on.

  • Confused 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 8/20/2018 at 10:53 AM, TomJH said:

I've seen them all from the Hollywood studio system days, I think, all the biggies.

I'm not counting, of course, some lost silent like London After Midnight which I doubt that anyone alive today has seen, of course. Now I try to catch up on some of the smaller, less celebrated films from that era.

As for Kane . . .

kane-cockatoo.jpg

I always liked that momentarily shocking moment (it shocked me, at least) with sudden appearance of the shrieking cockatiel with the missing eye. I know it's a minor moment and has nothing to do with the story but it made me wonder if years later it may have inspired Carol Reed to have his own cockatiel scene in The Third Man, a film with a couple of the actors from Kane in it, as well.

Kane is clearly a monumental, brilliant piece of filmmaking in so many ways. That masterful photography and all those matte paintings alone make it worth several viewings. But I never really get into the film emotionally. Welles's film noirs (Lady from Shanghai and A Touch of Evil) are my favourites from his career when it comes to repeat viewings.

Still, Kane is a film with so many striking visuals. Let's not forget that cinematographer Gregg Toland deserves so much credit for the look of the film. Welles must have been leaning on him constantly. "Can we do this? How about this? Never been done before? Let's try it!"

 

vlcsnap-00004.jpg

citizen-kane3.jpg

kane2-300x225.jpg

a6ae776bc8e0711e0c59eb11716ad4d2.jpg

One wonders if the idea that "Mad Love" influenced the "Citizen Kane" visuals in terms of Kane's nice bald head resembling Doctor Gogol's and the bits with both having cockatoos flying around, is fact or fiction? 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, drednm said:

Yes. Everyone knows. Move on.

Really? I've never seen this movie but read an article alluding to the connection to Rose Hobart being an inspiration, in a book about that box guy. 

Does "everyone" know that? It was certainly news to me, drednam.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 minutes ago, CaveGirl said:

Really? I've never seen this movie but read an article alluding to the connection to Rose Hobart being an inspiration, in a book about that box guy. 

Does "everyone" know that? It was certainly news to me, drednam.

He might have thought you were referring to Marion Davies.

  • Confused 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 8/20/2018 at 4:47 PM, Vautrin said:

Herman Mankiewicz was a fairly regular guest at Hearst's lavish boreathons at San

Simeon. So while other tycoons were used to some extent as models for Kane,

Hearst was the main one. The biggest shot Herman took was rosebud, which in

its original use had nothing to do with sleds. 

I wish you would go into more detail about this Mankiewicz connection, Vautrin.

You always have the most interesting information about these things and I would love to hear you elucidate further on this topic about Herman's resason for calling the sled "Rosebud".

Thanks in advance!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, CaveGirl said:

I wish you would go into more detail about this Mankiewicz connection, Vautrin.

You always have the most interesting information about these things and I would love to hear you elucidate further on this topic about Herman's resason for calling the sled "Rosebud".

Thanks in advance!

I gleaned the information about Mankiewicz and Hearst from two long articles by Pauline Kael

in The New Yorker from February of 1971. This was later turned into a book called, for some

crazy reason, The Citizen Kane Book. I'll have to skim through the magazines to find the details

about the relationship. Rosebud was Hearst's pet name for Marion Davies' pudendum. He must

have  felt that Mank using this in the script was a shot below the belt. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

And in regards to Beth's OP, and finally watching a renown classic film in its entirety...

It's now MY turn to admit that just today I FINALLY watched in ITS entirety the film Giant on TCM this morning.

And now the reason I'm bring this up in this thread about Citizen Kane is because I seemed to notice a few character trait similarities between Welles' Charles Foster Kane with that of James Dean's Jett Rink.

One example of this being that both characters would become quite wealthy during the course of their lives, and yet both would seem to never learn the meaning of that old saw, "Money can't buy you love", and thus with both characters becoming sad and pitiful men later in their lives.

(...anyone else ever consider this similarity in these two films too?)

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Did anyone here realize "Rosebud" was Joan Blondell's real first name? Puts a little different spin on it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Kane opened at the RKO Palace Theatre on Broadway in New York on May 1, 1941,[5] in Chicago on May 6, and in Los Angeles on May 8.[12]:115 Welles said that at the Chicago premiere that he attended the theater was almost empty.[13]:216 It did well in cities and larger towns but fared poorly in more remote areas. RKO still had problems getting exhibitors to show the film. For example, one chain controlling more than 500 theaters got Welles's film as part of a package but refused to play it, reportedly out of fear of Hearst.[12]:117 Hearst's disruption of the film's release damaged its box office performance and, as a result, it lost $160,000 during its initial run.[106]:164[107] The film earned $23,878 during its first week in New York. By the ninth week it only made $7,279. Overall it lost money in New York, Boston, Chicago, Los Angeles, San Francisco and Washington, D.C., but made a profit in Seattle.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

New Members:

Register Here

Learn more about the new message boards:

FAQ

Having problems?

Contact Us