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CaveGirl

Unheralded Actors Who Deserve Our Admiration

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Clifton Young

TCM viewers probably know him best for his frequent participation as Homer, the obnoxious loud mouth "Hiya, buddy boy!" always giving advice, in the Joe McDoakes comedy shorts

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But Young's film career started off as a kid in the Our Gang shorts

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And he can also be seen in a number of Warners film dramas, as well, often as a villain. One of his best known performances is as the blackmailer in Dark Passage

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Apparently he can be spotted as a flophouse bum in Treasure of the Sierra Madre, as well.

Young was only 33 when he died in 1951 in a hotel fire as a result of his smoking.

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Good topic, with plenty of possibilities.

I think 3 women who would fit this category were relatively old when they made their big-screen talkie debuts.  Well, relatively old by Hollywood standards.  They don't have a huge list of movies compared to others who were in the big-screen biz for say, 30 years, and all of them were dead by 1960.  My choices would be:

Constance Collier

Florence Bates

Hope Emerson

They might not be household names except for the most avid classic movie fans, but each time I see them in a film, no matter how brief their roles, they certainly make an impact and turn in memorable performances.

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I very much like Harry Davenport, who also came to film later in life.  He's one of my favorite dispensers of sound advice to the perplexed leading characters.

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24 minutes ago, Emily Emerac said:

I very much like Harry Davenport, who also came to film later in life.  He's one of my favorite dispensers of sound advice to the perplexed leading characters.

Well one actress agrees with you (and so do I).

 Bette Davis called Davenport "without a doubt [. . .] the greatest character actor of all time."[2][3]

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9 minutes ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

Well one actress agrees with you (and so do I).

 Bette Davis called Davenport "without a doubt [. . .] the greatest character actor of all time."[2][3]

I was curious about which movies they worked on together. According to a search on the IMDb, they costarred in:

THE SISTERS
JUAREZ
ALL THIS AND HEAVEN TOO
THE BRIDE CAME C.O.D.

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Tom Tully! a great voice actor from radio...but certainly memorable as well, from:

The Caine Mutiny (the captain)

The_Caine_Mutiny-5.jpg

'Charley Varrick' (the snitch)

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On 9/7/2018 at 6:57 PM, TomJH said:

I always thought Verree Teasdale was kinda hot - in an upper crust cream of society sort of way.

Hubby Adolphe Menjou probably agreed.

Yeah, Verree Teasdale was good at playing likeable snobs, and could fill out an evening dress with the best of them.  I don’t know if they were necessarily unheralded, but Edward Everett Horton and Eric Blore were great character actors who made every movie they were in better.

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For me, someone who fits this description, is Mr. Allyn Joslyn. A lot of you probably know who he was, but I don't think he gets the appreciation I feel he deserves. I've always thought he was pretty funny. 

Image result for allyn joslyn

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Rudy Bond

he was the grinning psycho in Nightfall (1956)

sorry about the attachment I was trying to paste a photo but hit the wrong thing

 


 

 

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Two supporting players from the 30's and 40's, Marc Lawrence and Paul Guilfoyle, were both trained stage actors who brought an understated presence to the screen. Lawrence played mostly gangsters in films (and wonderfully so) but had one grand role as a mute in Henry Hathaway's THE SHEPHERD OF THE HILLS.  Paul Guilfoyle (no relation to current actor of same name) co-starred in the screen version of WINTERSET in a brilliant sympathetic role. He was also great in a Republic B called THOU SHALT NOT KILL.

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23 hours ago, Ray Faiola said:

 Paul Guilfoyle (no relation to current actor of same name) co-starred in the screen version of WINTERSET in a brilliant sympathetic role. He was also great in a Republic B called THOU SHALT NOT KILL.

And Cody Jarrett, concerned about his breathing, gave him a "little air" in a car trunk.

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14 hours ago, NipkowDisc said:

give it up for the unforgettable Skelton Knaggs.

Image result for skelton knaggs

Yes,  and he doesn't even have to say a word to make an impact:

image.jpeg.edaac6ae40f3ea46bac23fa45e5db529.jpeg

 

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I want to submit an unheralded actor who deserves admiration for his acting and longevity in Hollywood and Television. You don't know his name but you know his face. 

I first noticed Charles Lane in the James Cagney/Joan Blondell vehicle "Blonde Crazy" which I remember watching as a kid some fifty years ago.  I do not know why his face and voice stuck with me then I realized this is the same actor who I see on every television sitcom almost weekly.  Mr. Lane must have had the knack of being a reliable character actor because he was cast in such notable movies such as 42nd Street, Gold Diggers of 1933, Twentieth Century, Mr. Smith Goes To Washington, The Music Man and many other movies to numerous to name.  I remember seeing Mr. Lane on such television series such as I Love Lucy, Twilight Zone, Bewitched, Gomer Pyle, Beverly Hillbillies, Honey West, The Girl With Something Extra, Mork and Mindy. 

He was a dependable reliable actor.  His longevity in Hollywood movies and television should warrant discussion among the powers to be to have a star dedicated on his behalf on that famous walkway of theirs.  

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1 hour ago, thomasterryjr said:

I want to submit an unheralded actor who deserves admiration for his acting and longevity in Hollywood and Television. You don't know his name but you know his face. 

I first noticed Charles Lane in the James Cagney/Joan Blondell vehicle "Blonde Crazy" which I remember watching as a kid some fifty years ago.  I do not know why his face and voice stuck with me then I realized this is the same actor who I see on every television sitcom almost weekly.  Mr. Lane must have had the knack of being a reliable character actor because he was cast in such notable movies such as 42nd Street, Gold Diggers of 1933, Twentieth Century, Mr. Smith Goes To Washington, The Music Man and many other movies to numerous to name.  I remember seeing Mr. Lane on such television series such as I Love Lucy, Twilight Zone, Bewitched, Gomer Pyle, Beverly Hillbillies, Honey West, The Girl With Something Extra, Mork and Mindy. 

He was a dependable reliable actor.  His longevity in Hollywood movies and television should warrant discussion among the powers to be to have a star dedicated on his behalf on that famous walkway of theirs.  

Mr. Lane was one fine actor and yea,  he had a very long career.     My first exposure to him was in Get Smart  in the episode "My Nephew the Spy" (1965) as Uncle Abner  (with Max as his nephew!).

Charles Lane actor.jpg

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Louis Jean Heydt

Tall blonde actor. You remember him from 'They Made Me a Criminal' and 'They Were Expendable'

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1 hour ago, Sgt_Markoff said:

Louis Jean Heydt

Tall blonde actor. You remember him from 'They Made Me a Criminal' and 'They Were Expendable'

yb4vn6e2

And don't forget his role as Joe Brody,  the guy who wouldn't look Marlowe in his eyes when talking to him. 

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Al Mulock. Canadian-Born star who appeared in both of Sergio Leone's biggest hits. Suspected drug habit; committed suicide on set during filming. Look at that face!

Al_Mulock_in_Once_Upon_a_Time_in_the_Wes

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You'd be surprised at this next name: Gale Gordon. We all know him as the blowhard on "The Lucy Show".

But he had a long career before that; he was multi-talented performer with experience in many mediums; and once was even quite handsome.

gordon-radio.jpg

 

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Harry Lauter is a very obscure name...fascinating backstory though...

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Harry_Lauter

Its extraordinary to me, how a guy like this appears in a zillion movies but we never notice him. Admittedly, he worked often as 'uncredited' but its just another point in support of the classic studio system. They kept people on.

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Here is another actor that always added something to the films he was in and had a long career.  Of course maybe he isn't 'unheralded' to most of the folks here:   Wallace Ford.

He played some creeps and criminals in the 30s (and also some comedic parts),  featured in a many noirs during the 40s and 50s (Black Angel, Dead Reckoning, The Set-Up,  The Breaking Point, He Ran All the Way),  did mostly westerns in the 50s and even 60s,  often playing a lovable crusty old guy all the way into the 60s, with his last film being A Patch of Blue with the great Sidney Poitier.

 Wallace-Ford-1946.jpg

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Sidney Poitier was indeed great. Is he still alive? There's an astonishing dearth in this era, of men to admire. I was watching 'Red River' tonight for really, the first time all the way through--and I have to say I was embarrassed at the tears rolling down my face. Embarrassing. It's a superb movie. I'd only ever before, seen passages of it. I bawled my eyes out.

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