CinemaInternational

Burt Reynolds (1936-2018)

113 posts in this topic

Burt Reynolds, one of the top box-office stars of the 1970s, has died at the age of 82. His hits included Deliverance, Smokey and the Bandit, Hooper, and Starting Over. In addition, he was Oscar nominated for Boogie Nights in 1997. His final film, Once Upon a Time in Hollywood, a film directed by Quentin Tarantino about the mass hysteria following the Manson killings in 1969, will be released next summer.

 

https://www.hollywoodreporter.com/news/burt-reynolds-dead-deliverance-boogie-nights-star-was-82-831093?utm_source=twitter&utm_source=t.co&utm_medium=referral

  • Thanks 3
  • Sad 6

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That is sad. I remember him on the old tv series "Riverboat". I think he did some of his best work in "Deliverance" and even better in "Boogie Nights". Two of the few times he wasn't playing a caricature of himself.

I think due to capitalizing on his Playgirl magazine popularity both by him and his pr & agents he wasn't given opportunities to be taken seriously and break out of that wise-cracking, too-cool-for-the-room mode.  It obviously paid off financially, because he was successful in a string of hardly-serious roles & films. But artistically, I can't help but feel he was disappointed, and that's sad, too. 

  • Like 9

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I went to two tapings of Evening Shade in the fall of 1991. He was wonderful on that show. He not only starred in but directed those episodes. One of them featured a guest appearance at the end by his pal Dom Deluise. They were having a lot of fun on the set. We all were.

I'd been to other shows filming around that time. But my visits to Evening Shade were memorable, largely because of Burt. At one point they were going to do a stunt. Sitcoms don't normally do stunts, but because this was a Burt Reynolds production and he was known for stunt scenes in his most popular movies, he wanted to do a stunt for this episode. They had to move the cameras over to the other side of the stage to use a temporary set, not the main house set. And the stunt coordinator had to get it all set up. 

So while they were doing that, I guess Burt felt we'd get bored waiting. So he grabbed a microphone and came into the bleachers and sat right down by us. He started doing a trivia game about his career, where anyone in the audience could ask him anything (within reason) about his movies or TV series. People asked silly questions. One little girl asked why he always seemed to chew gum on screen. He said it was because it prevented him from smoking. Someone else asked him what his favorite song was. He said it was "Crazy" by Patsy Cline. So one of the female costars of Evening Shade, almost as if on cue, came over to the bleachers, took the microphone from him and sang "Crazy." It was sweet. The stunt coordinator was ready and they proceeded with the rest of the filming.

During my second visit, I sat next to Doug McClure (the actor from The Virginian). Doug was there because he was a buddy of Burt's and he was going to be the main guest star for the next episode. Doug was sitting in the audience to study how the show was filmed, so he knew what to expect the following week when he reported for work. I got the impression Doug was looking forward to doing scenes with Burt. Everyone who came on to the set of Evening Shade wanted to be there and everyone was glad they had been there. And that was all because of Burt Reynolds.

  • Like 7
  • Thanks 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

WOW. I didnt see this coming. Didn't realize he was that old.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
19 minutes ago, Hibi said:

WOW. I didnt see this coming. Didn't realize he was that old.

He was a nice-looking man and I should know because I bought that Magazine with the centerfold. LOL

 I can remember when he started out on "Riverboat" with Darren McGavin and that was a long time ago.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
34 minutes ago, TopBilled said:

I went to two tapings of Evening Shade in the fall of 1991. He was wonderful on that show. He not only starred in but directed those episodes. One of them featured a guest appearance at the end by his pal Dom Deluise. They were having a lot of fun on the set. We all were.

I'd been to other shows filming around that time. But my visits to Evening Shade were memorable, largely because of Burt. At one point they were going to do a stunt. Sitcoms don't normally do stunts, but because this was a Burt Reynolds production and he was known for stunt scenes in his most popular movies, he wanted to do a stunt for this episode. They had to move the cameras over to the other side of the stage to use a temporary set, not the main house set. And the stunt coordinator had to get it all set up. 

So while they were doing that, I guess Burt felt we'd get bored waiting. So he grabbed a microphone and came into the bleachers and sat right down by us. He started doing a trivia game about his career, where anyone in the audience could ask him anything (within reason) about his movies or TV series. People asked silly questions. One little girl asked why he always seemed to chew gum on screen. He said it was because it prevented him from smoking. Someone else asked him what his favorite song was. He said it was "Crazy" by Patsy Cline. So one of the female costars of Evening Shade, almost as if on cue, came over to the bleachers, took the microphone from him and sang "Crazy." It was sweet. The stunt coordinator was ready and they proceeded with the rest of the filming.

During my second visit, I sat next to Doug McClure (the actor from The Virginian). Doug was there because he was a buddy of Burt's and he was going to be the main guest star for the next episode. Doug was sitting in the audience to study how the show was filmed, so he knew what to expect the following week when he reported for work. I got the impression Doug was looking forward to doing scenes with Burt. Everyone who came on to the set of Evening Shade wanted to be there and everyone was glad they had been there. And that was all because of Burt Reynolds.

I saw that show in reruns, never during its original run. It was obviously written to showcase BR, but in my viewing he was a very good actor - and easily held his own surrounded by a lot of talented costars.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
18 minutes ago, Princess of Tap said:

He was a nice-looking man and I should know because I bought that Magazine with the centerfold. LOL

 I can remember when he started out on "Riverboat" with Darren McGavin and that was a long time ago.

Yes, I can remember when he was on Gunsmoke......

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

About 22 minutes in, Johnny Carson does "This is Your Life." with Burt:

 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I knew he was getting up there. You could tell when he made a TV appearance.

Gunsmoke is on the Inspiration channel every night. A young Burt played Quint

Asper, the "half breed" who had to put up with a lot of crap from other people,

though Matt, Doc, Festus, and Kitty liked him. I think they are just coming to the

seasons when Burt was there. Unlike many TV stars he became a famous movie

star too.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I worked with Burt not that long ago and he was in ill health at the time.  He follows his best friend Charles Durning (1923-2012).  R.I.P.  

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Vautrin said:

I knew he was getting up there. You could tell when he made a TV appearance.

Gunsmoke is on the Inspiration channel every night. A young Burt played Quint

Asper, the "half breed" who had to put up with a lot of crap from other people,

though Matt, Doc, Festus, and Kitty liked him. I think they are just coming to the

seasons when Burt was there.

*Unlike many TV stars he became a famous movie

star too.

But those classic TV actors were selected by many Hollywood Golden Age professionals who really knew how to ferret out potential stardom Talent.

Dick Powell launched Steve McQueen.

Jack Warner and William T. Orr made James Garner, Troy Donahue and Connie Stevens a stars on TV and in movies at the same time.

 there was so much talent to choose from at that time. And then of course there was Clint Eastwood.

 

But what I found all the more fascinating were those who had a resume in Golden Age movies but were just character actors or supporting players.

It was amazing how movies had utilized people like Richard Long, Raymond Burr, Robert Stack, Nick Adams and Michael Landon just to name a few-- who became tremendously big TV stars commanding big salaries.

 the real excitement in Show Business was not in movies in the late fifties early sixties it was on classic TV where all this Talent was getting ready to bust out-- and I can't forget those coming from Broadway like Andy Griffith, Don Knotts, and Dick Van Dyke.

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The last half-dozen or so times that I saw him on talk shows, they had brought him out and put him in his chair or on the couch during the commercial breaks. You never saw him walking to or from the stage. 

I recently read his memoir (very funny, and recommended) and in it he states that his body was pretty much ruined by his haphazard stunt work, which destroyed his joints, spine, and hip. He was under a lot of medication for years.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
11 minutes ago, Gershwin fan said:

Cardiac Arrest 

Thanks.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I noticed he'd had a facelift in his later years. The difference was very noticeable. I'd like to read his book now.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Brrrcold said:

I saw that show in reruns, never during its original run. It was obviously written to showcase BR, but in my viewing he was a very good actor - and easily held his own surrounded by a lot of talented costars.

Yes, it was a series meant to showcase his talents and unique appeal. Most of the supporting cast were people he'd worked with before, and many of the guest stars were his pals. I could tell by his interaction with the audience he thrived on the relationship he had with his fans. He was special that way.

I've seen many of the episodes of Evening Shade but still have not seen the two episodes where I was a member of the live audience. Since these were filmed in the fall of 1991, they would have been broadcast during the show's second season.

One thing I remember is we parked and were brought into the studio, and they gave us a mini-tour. The guide who led us to our seats told us when writer-producer Linda Bloodworth Thomason was creating the show for Burt, she couldn't think of an adequate title. And it was Linda's friend Hilary Clinton who suggested the title Evening Shade. Bill Clinton's younger brother Roger Clinton was a musician. He and his band were usually on hand to warm up the audience before the tapings began on Evening Shade and Designing Women (another Bloodworth Thomason hit also in production at this time).

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I remember his GUNSMOKE years.  I also remember EVENING SHADE quite well.  Hal Holbrook was in it, too, if I remember correctly (I haven't seen it since it was originally broadcast) and Ann Wedgeworth.  Maybe she was the one crooning to TopBilled and friends.

I remember his romances with Judy Carne, Dinah Shore, Sally Field and Loni Anderson.  He had an affair with Inger Stevens before she died.  He never spoke publicly about it.  I LOVED that Cosmo centerfold and I probably bought that issue, too.

He was great on the TONIGHT show.  I saw SHARKEY'S MACHINE twice in the theater.  I also liked him in STARTING OVER.  I think his best performances were in the excellent DELIVERANCE and BOOGIE NIGHTS.  He turned down some great parts including Jack Nicholson's roles in TERMS OF ENDEARMENT and ONE FLEW OVER THE CUCKOO'S NEST.  I'm sure TCM will honor him.  He was a good actor who never took himself too seriously but I kinda wish he had taken his career a little more seriously.

Rest in Peace, Burt, and thanks for all the great TV and movie memories.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So Sad! 82 is not all that old for some. Many are gone from his Smokey And The Bandits movies. I welcome a tribute day very soon. Enough movies for a 3-day weekend. Perfect if Sally Field could guest host. Has Best Little W/House In Texas played on TCM lately?

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It was only a couple of months ago I heard a list of all the roles Burt claimed to have turned down. Perhaps that's from his most recent book. I mean, it was absolutely mind-boggling. Whole careers were made on roles Burt turned down! Michael Corleone (he claimed Coppola personally offered him the role, then called him back and apologized: "Brando says he won't do the movie if you're in it"); Superman, James Bond after Connery (they offered it to an American?), John McLain in Die Hard, Han Freaking Solo, Mickey in Rocky. Some more I'm forgetting (and yet, he chose to do Stroker Ace! Possibly he and/or his agent didn't have the best career compasses ...)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
18 minutes ago, sewhite2000 said:

It was only a couple of months ago I heard a list of all the roles Burt claimed to have turned down. Perhaps that's from his most recent book. I mean, it was absolutely mind-boggling. Whole careers were made on roles Burt turned down! Michael Corleone (he claimed Coppola personally offered him the role, then called him back and apologized: "Brando says he won't do the movie if you're in it"); Superman, James Bond after Connery (they offered it to an American?), John McLain in Die Hard, Han Freaking Solo, Mickey in Rocky. Some more I'm forgetting (and yet, he chose to do Stroker Ace! Possibly he and/or his agent didn't have the best career compasses ...)

As I recall, Reynolds passed up the Jack Nicholson role in "Terms of Endearment" to do "Stroker Ace." He had promised his longtime friend, the stuntman-turned-director Hal Needham, that he would star in the NASCAR-based comedy. Of course, Nicholson went on to win his second of three Oscars for his performance in "Terms."

By the way, James Brolin reportedly was in line to succeed Sir Roger Moore as 007 , but it didn't work out.

Image result for stroker ace burt reynolds jack nicholson

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes! I knew I was forgetting something. Burt claimed to have turned down both Terms of Endearment and One Flew over the Cuckoo's Nest, both films for which Jack won Oscars!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
27 minutes ago, ChristineHoard said:

I remember his GUNSMOKE years.  I also remember EVENING SHADE quite well.  Hal Holbrook was in it, too, if I remember correctly (I haven't seen it since it was originally broadcast) and Ann Wedgeworth.  Maybe she was the one crooning to TopBilled and friends.

I remember his romances with Judy Carne, Dinah Shore, Sally Field and Loni Anderson.  He had an affair with Inger Stevens before she died.  He never spoke publicly about it.  I LOVED that Cosmo centerfold and I probably bought that issue, too.

He was great on the TONIGHT show.  I saw SHARKEY'S MACHINE twice in the theater.  I also liked him in STARTING OVER.  I think his best performances were in the excellent DELIVERANCE and BOOGIE NIGHTS.  He turned down some great parts including Jack Nicholson's roles in TERMS OF ENDEARMENT and ONE FLEW OVER THE CUCKOO'S NEST.  I'm sure TCM will honor him.  He was a good actor who never took himself too seriously but I kinda wish he had taken his career a little more seriously.

Rest in Peace, Burt, and thanks for all the great TV and movie memories.

The End is a largely forgotten but worth seeing off-the-wall Reynolds movie, a dark comedy about a guy trying to commit suicide.

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

New Members:

Register Here

Learn more about the new message boards:

FAQ

Having problems?

Contact Us