LawrenceA

December 2018 Schedule is up

113 posts in this topic

20 minutes ago, MovieCollectorOH said:

This pic of Giorgio Moroder below is just one I quickly found on the Internet, but you get the idea.  This is him at his recording studio, playing modular synthesizer for the keyboard parts during a tracking session.  Quite possibly the same rig you are hearing on the Top Gun soundtrack.  Off the top of my head he also did similar work on Flashdance: What A Feeling (Irene Cara), and the 1984 release of the movie Metropolis (Pat Benetar, Freddie Mercury, etc).

It sounds to me like the only conventional instrument used here is a gated drum kit (typical for the 80s).  So this may have just been Moroder, a drummer, and Terri Nunn.  Definitely not all at the same time.

The funny thing about this scenario is that this music was not in Berlin's style.  They (Terri Nunn) had to set aside their creative differences for this, but it payed off.

http://moviecollector.us/pics_to_hotlink_on_TCM/Giorgio+Moroder.jpg

With some basic electronics theory and creativity, users could tweak the Moog modular to get exactly the sounds they wanted, or just be surprised.  Due to its size and complexity, it was usually just used for the studio recording.  The thinking back then was it was the most important performance, the one everyone would hear over and over.  So it had to sound interesting.  My how times have changed.

Ok you know how I am with these things.  I should really stop. http://moviecollector.us/pics_to_hotlink_on_TCM/forum-twisted.gif

You learn something new every day.

I didn't know that Moroder had won three Oscars. In addition to the Best Song honors for "Take My Breath Away," he shared the 1983 Best Song award with Irene Cara and Keith Forsey for "Flashdance... What a Feeling" from "Flashdance."

He also received the 1978 Best Original Score award for "Midnight Express."

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16 hours ago, Hepburn Fan said:

I was recently in a situation where it appeared someone was angry with me, due to this quoting process. In my opinion, it was an unfortunate misunderstanding.

To me it also depends on whether you quote the relevant bits or quote the whole damn thing (including photos) to add one line.  The latter is incredibly irritating.

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13 minutes ago, Fedya said:

To me it also depends on whether you quote the relevant bits or quote the whole damn thing (including photos) to add one line.  The latter is incredibly irritating.

But so easy to do!

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On 9/27/2018 at 8:03 AM, Fedya said:

To me it also depends on whether you quote the relevant bits or quote the whole damn thing (including photos) to add one line.

It's like seeing an entire blog page get quoted at times, isn't it.  Or maybe even random bits of a phone directory.

Sorry TL;DR couldn't make it through the rest of your second sentence.   http://moviecollectoroh.com/pics_to_hotlink_on_TCM/forum-pinch.gif  http://moviecollectoroh.com/pics_to_hotlink_on_TCM/forum-twisted.gif

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I'm more surprised that Otto Censor let me say "damn".

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Okay, also in chronological order of release, here are the movies I'm likely to watch in the second half of December:

Little Women (RKO, 1933)
The Young in Heart (United Artists, 1938)
Bachelor Mother (RKO, 1939)
Christmas in July (Paramount, 1940)
Remember the Night (Paramount, 1940)
The Maltese Falcon (Warner Bros., 1941)
Meet Me in St. Louis (MGM, 1944)
Murder, My Sweet (RKO, 1944)
Lady on a Train (Universal, 1945)
Lady in the Lake (MGM, 1947)
The Bishop's Wife (RKO, 1947)
You Never Can Tell (Universal, 1951)
A Christmas Carol (Dist. in US by United Artists, 1951)
Monkey Business (20th Century Fox, 1952)
High Society (MGM, 1956)
Jailhouse Rock (MGM, 1957)
Some Like It Hot (United Artists, 1959)
Midnight Lace (Univeral, 1960)
The Absent-Minded Professor (Disney, 1961)
The Thrill of It All (Universal, 1963)
A Hard Day's Night (United Artists, 1964)
The Way We Were (Columbia, 1973)
Smokey and the Bandit (Universal, 1977)
Smokey and the Bandit II (Universal, 1980)
Little Women (Columbia, 1994)

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I'm disappointed that Noir Alley won't be showing Christmas Holiday, which I've wanted to see for a long time.  It would have been a TCM premiere, and it isn't available on DVD/Blu-ray.  (Yes, I know it's available on YouTube, but my satellite internet service, the only type available in my semi-rural area, doesn't do well with streaming.)  Eddie Muller obviously wanted to show it (it was in the line-up on the Noir Alley page), so I assume it was a rights problem.

I'm very excited, however, that they'll be showing The Holly and The Ivy starring Ralph Richardson, which will be a TCM premiere and one of the few Christmas movies on the schedule that isn't a common sight.  (I love all of the Christmas movies they're showing, but as a holiday movie aficionado, I've seen almost all of them multiple times.)  They had The Holly and The Ivy on the December schedule a few years back, only to remove it, so I assume they cleared up the rights problem.  Very nice.

The "Christmas Crime" line-up on Dec. 17, while mostly familiar to me (except Crooks Anonymous), is also a welcome and creative presentation of holiday movies that aren't the same old "classics," as much as I love those classics.  (And when I first looked over the schedule, I thought I saw a Roy Rogers Christmas movie that I haven't previously seen, but I'm not finding it now.)

Also on the plus side, I'm happy to see the line-up of Dick Powell movies for his latest Star-of-the-Month turn.  And I'm glad that Eddie Muller is showing Too Late for Tears on Noir Alley; I saw the movie in its August non-Noir-Alley showing, really enjoyed it, and hoped that I'd be able to hear Eddie's commentary some time soon.

 

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If TCM had Holiday on its schedule, they must've cleared the rights for it. I assume it's a money problem or something. VERY disappointing. Beware, My Lovely is not a great substitute........

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15 minutes ago, Hibi said:

If TCM had Holiday on its schedule, they must've cleared the rights for it. I assume it's a money problem or something. VERY disappointing. Beware, My Lovely is not a great substitute........

Re: Christmas Holiday.  I figured if Eddie Muller had it scheduled for his Noir Alley series, then he would have cleared up the rights issues (or TCM did).  I would think that Eddie Muller would have a pretty good idea of what films are available.  What I also wonder is if he has already filmed his opening and closing comments.  I imagine that he films all his introductions in the same manner that Mankiewicz & co. film their introductions--in batches.  Obviously these introductions aren't airing live.  With December only two months away, I'd have to think that Muller is already done with his 2018 series and is working on 2019.  I saw that the film that replaced Pick Up on South Street was originally scheduled for January 2019. 

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Yes, scheduling (and, I assume Eddie's comments) are made far in advance......

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I would first like to comment about the TCM site. It needs a little TLC. The menus at the top are not consistent. You cannot pull down Noir Alley from here.

I wonder if Eddie is in charge of Noir Alley, or a hosts like the others? I have a feeling hosts may have some input toward scheduling, but are not in charge of it.

About Christmas Holiday. Being something of a 'brave fool,' I will ask opinions in this thread first. I would consider putting a thread in "Information, Please," respectfully asking what happened to Christmas Holiday. Bringing it to the attention of TCM, to me, is a form of advocacy.

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I was hoping for another showing of Larceny Inc, think it was on last Christmas and loved it. Edward G. Robinson as Pressure Maxwell had the most amazing gangster voice, dresses the part and makes it some good all-around fun.

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On 9/27/2018 at 6:28 AM, jakeem said:

You learn something new every day.

I didn't know that Moroder had won three Oscars. In addition to the Best Song honors for "Take My Breath Away," he shared the 1983 Best Song award with Irene Cara and Keith Forsey for "Flashdance... What a Feeling" from "Flashdance."

He also received the 1978 Best Original Score award for "Midnight Express."

Here's a well put together BBC radio documentary on Giorgio Moroder, in two files.

Electric Dreams: The Giorgio Moroder Story - Episode 1
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=19yXd9t7aO8

Electric Dreams: The Giorgio Moroder Story - Episode 2
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G2VpXyishtE
 

You might be interested in this part of the second clip, Tom Whitlock and Terri Nunn talk about their experiences with Moroder on the music from Top Gun:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G2VpXyishtE&feature=youtu.be&t=2349

 

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11 minutes ago, Ampersand said:

I was hoping for another showing of Larceny Inc, think it was on last Christmas and loved it. Edward G. Robinson as Pressure Maxwell had the most amazing gangster voice, dresses the part and makes it some good all-around fun.

Yes, it aired as part of a double feature with FITZWILLY.

 

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4 hours ago, MovieCollectorOH said:

Here's a well put together BBC radio documentary on Giorgio Moroder, in two files.

Electric Dreams: The Giorgio Moroder Story - Episode 1
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=19yXd9t7aO8

Electric Dreams: The Giorgio Moroder Story - Episode 2
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G2VpXyishtE
 

You might be interested in this part of the second clip, Tom Whitlock and Terri Nunn talk about their experiences with Moroder on the music from Top Gun:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G2VpXyishtE&feature=youtu.be&t=2349

 

Thanks so much! By the way, Berlin -- fronted by Nunn and featuring many of the original group members -- still tours. She sounds as good as she did in the 1980s.

 

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I'm a little disappointed that they don't have an In Memoriam lineup close to the end of the month. Sure there's the Burt Reynolds thing but I was hoping they'd at least pull out The Band Wagon as Nanette Fabray died earlier this year.

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26 minutes ago, twilicorn said:

I'm a little disappointed that they don't have an In Memoriam lineup close to the end of the month. Sure there's the Burt Reynolds thing but I was hoping they'd at least pull out The Band Wagon as Nanette Fabray died earlier this year.

I'm wondering if they may have pushed it to early January. I'm hoping so, anyway, as there are plenty of people who have passed that deserve recognition.

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1 minute ago, LawrenceA said:

I'm wondering if they may have pushed it to early January. I'm hoping so, anyway, as there are plenty of people who have passed that deserve recognition.

It would make sense if they did an In Memoriam in January.  In 2016, we had Debbie Reynolds and Carrie Fisher pass away after the In Memoriam.  Not that I think TCM is thinking, "wait? Maybe we should do this in January, what if someone big dies in December?" but it would make sense to do a 2018 retrospective after 2018 is over. 

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1 minute ago, speedracer5 said:

It would make sense if they did an In Memoriam in January.  In 2016, we had Debbie Reynolds and Carrie Fisher pass away after the In Memoriam.  Not that I think TCM is thinking, "wait? Maybe we should do this in January, what if someone big dies in December?" but it would make sense to do a 2018 retrospective after 2018 is over. 

Some of us have been advocating it wait till January for a while now. There is usually always someone important who dies in the later part of December. And it does seem premature to commemorate a year when the year is technically not yet over. 

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On 9/29/2018 at 3:07 AM, jakeem said:

Thanks so much! By the way, Berlin -- fronted by Nunn and featuring many of the original group members -- still tours. She sounds as good as she did in the 1980s.

 

I did some more digging on this.  Giorgio Moroder used a Moog synthesizer in his beginning, but then moved to a Roland System 700 modular, the large black synthesizer you see behind him in the picture of him in the documentary.  Also I have seen him in videos talking about the problems they had with the early Moog modular, so it is no wonder they moved on to something else.

For his movies in the mid 80s, things got so busy that he hired Arthur Barrow, a keyboardist/bassist from Frank Zappa's band to fill in on the duties.  This included studio takes of different versions of certain movie soundtrack songs, and in particular the song Take My Breath Away.

Barrow went on to make records with different 80s acts and do various other things - including scoring these silent films:
Torrent (1926, starring Greta Garbo)
The Boob (1926, starring Joan Crawford)
The Cameraman (1928, starring Buster Keaton)

Here he is standing around talking with a younger musician about a current project.  You can see some kind of modular synthesizer behind him - it appears to be newer.  Some things just don't go away, even Giorgio Moroder considers these to be antiques by now.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4OXU2nJiGxM

Finally here are a couple clips I was able to find from silent films for which he has produced the score.

This is from Torrent (1926).  Towards the end the bass line sounds fairly interesting to me, and he is first and foremost a bassist.  So I'm going to say this is likely him.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XCcrOsjdpuQ

These two links are from The Cameraman (1928).  He isn't listed on IMDB for this, but I have recorded this from TCM and he is in the credits.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rNwGEzg2Cqk

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WldQWTzC0zg


So there you have it.  The guy who played synthesizer on Take My Breath Away also did the scoring for The Cameraman, which I think turned out quite good as far as silent film music goes.

 

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On 9/30/2018 at 9:34 AM, TopBilled said:

Some of us have been advocating it wait till January for a while now. There is usually always someone important who dies in the later part of December. And it does seem premature to commemorate a year when the year is technically not yet over. 

This is true. If all "In Memoriam" s were produced by Dec 20 of any given year, they would have excluded the remembrances of:

Dean Martin 12/25/95

Eartha Kitt 12/25/08

Charles Chaplin 12/25/77

Jack Klugman 12/24/12

Charles Durning 12/24/12

Peter Lawford 12/24/84

-just to name a few.

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4 minutes ago, sagebrush said:

This is true. If all "In Memoriam" s were produced by Dec 20 of any given year, they would have excluded the remembrances of:

Dean Martin 12/25/95

Eartha Kitt 12/25/08

Charles Chaplin 12/25/77

Jack Klugman 12/24/12

Charles Durning 12/24/12

Peter Lawford 12/24/84

-just to name a few.

In the case of Debbie Reynolds, who died on the 28th of December, 2016 they waited to include her with the ones who died in 2017 which didn't seem correct.

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Hope I don't sound like a jerk for pointing this out, but obviously a couple of those people died well before there was a TCM. But I get your point.

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12 minutes ago, sewhite2000 said:

Hope I don't sound like a jerk for pointing this out, but obviously a couple of those people died well before there was a TCM. But I get your point.

What I intended by writing "if all In Memoriams" was a generalization of media outlets and eras. I didn't quite know how else to better word it. 

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