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cigarjoe

Getting It Right

46 posts in this topic

3 hours ago, TikiSoo said:

A DJ playing a two year old song on the radio is wholly acceptable "filler" for the current top 10. After all, you couldn't rotate only the top 10 or 20 songs all day long, could you?

I agree, and it would make it more realistic, at least as far as the radio station playlists in my area were.

It's the same concept as when I watch a period piece set in some decade of the 20th century, and they only use cars from the year that movie was set, or very close to it, when really it should be a mix of cars from many years and decades before the setting. 

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7 hours ago, TikiSoo said:

A DJ playing a two year old song on the radio is wholly acceptable "filler" for the current top 10. After all, you couldn't rotate only the top 10 or 20 songs all day long, could you?

From the late 60's to early 70's I worked at WABC-AM "Musicradio" in NYC.  Yeah, alongside the late Dan Ingram, Lundy, Harrison & Cousin Brucie, well before ABC pulled the plug on the music in '83 to go all talk.

The DJ's recirculated 40 songs per day.  Hence the phrase "Top 40's". Each music list was configured at a music meeting each Monday by the entire staff & DJs according to what songs were highest rated in Billboard and other music ratings' venues that week. Usually the last couple or few songs were either a particular DJ's wild-card favorite or one of the general staff's.

Although '62 was a few years before my tenure there, I'm able to access many music lists from various times.  Here, for example, is a typical week's music programming for the week of Aug.7, 1962:

(TW refers to "This Week's" ratings and, of course, LW refers to the song's standing the previous week).

 

                                                                         
 TW                                                             LW
  1. The Loco-Motion - Little Eva (Dimension)      *2 weeks #1*  1
  2. Roses Are Red (My Love) - Bobby Vinton (Epic)               2
  3. Breaking Up is Hard to Do - Neil Sedaka (RCA)               5
  4. The Wah Watusi - The Orlons (Cameo)                         3
  5. Twist and Shout - The Isley Brothers (Wand)                 4
  6. You'll Lose a Good Thing - Barbara Lynn (Jamie)             7
  7. You Belong to Me - The Duprees (Coed)                      11
 *8. Sealed With a Kiss - Brian Hyland (ABC-Paramount)           9
  9. Sheila - Tommy Roe (ABC-Paramount)                         14
 10. Ahab the Arab - Ray Stevens (Mercury)                      16
 11. Bring It on Home to Me - Sam Cooke (RCA)                   15
 12. Speedy Gonzalez - Pat Boone (Dot)                           6
 13. Wolverton Mountain - Claude King (Columbia)                10
 14. Party Lights - Claudine Clark (Chancellor)                 12
 15. I Can't Stop Loving You - Ray Charles (ABC-Paramount)      17
 16. You Don't Know Me - Ray Charles (ABC-Paramount)            23
 17. The Stripper - David Rose & his Orchestra (MGM)             8
 18. Things - Bobby Darin (Atco)                                36
 19. Having a Party - Sam Cooke (RCA)                           24
 20. Little Diane - Dion (Laurie)                               18
 21. I Need Your Loving - Don Gardner & Dee Dee Ford (Fire)     13
*22. Ramblin' Rose - Nat "King" Cole (Capitol)                  32
 23. (Girls, Girls, Girls) Made to Love - Eddie Hodges (Cadence)31
 24. Johnny Get Angry - Joanie Sommers (Warner Brothers)        20
 25. Theme From Dr. Kildare - Richard Chamberlain (MGM)         22
*26. Dancin' Party - Chubby Checker (Parkway)                   19
 27. Gravy (For My Mashed Potatoes) - Dee Dee Sharp (Cameo)     21
 28. Call Me Mr. In-Between - Burl Ives (Decca)                 39
*29. Vacation - Connie Francis (MGM)                            29
 30. I Love You the Way You Are - Bobby Vinton (Diamond)        26
 31. Stop the Wedding - Etta James (Argo)                       --
 32. Come On Little Angel - The Belmonts (Sabina)               --
 33. Reap What You Sow - Billy Stewart (Chess)                  25
 34. Limbo Rock - The Champs (Challenge)                        28
*35. Till There Was You - Valjean (Carlton)                     40
 36. My Daddy Is President - Little Jo Ann (Kapp)               --
 37. Glory of Love - Don Gardner & Dee Dee Ford (KC)            35
*38. Have a Good Time - Sue Thompson (Hickory)                  27
 39. Route 66 Theme - Nelson Riddle (Capitol)                   --
*40. I've Got My Eyes on You/Teen Age Idol -                      
                                   
     
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11 hours ago, TikiSoo said:

 After all, you couldn't rotate only the top 10 or 20 songs all day long, could you?

I thought that was what radio did then.  AM at least.

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3 hours ago, Zea said:

From the late 60's to early 70's I worked at WABC-AM "Musicradio" in NYC.  Yeah, alongside the late Dan Ingram, Lundy, Harrison & Cousin Brucie, well before ABC pulled the plug on the music in '83 to go all talk.

The DJ's recirculated 40 songs per day.  Hence the phrase "Top 40's". Each music list was configured at a music meeting each Monday by the entire staff & DJs according to what songs were highest rated in Billboard and other music ratings' venues that week. Usually the last couple or few songs were either a particular DJ's wild-card favorite or one of the general staff's.

Although '62 was a few years before my tenure there, I'm able to access many music lists from various times.  Here, for example, is a typical week's music programming for the week of Aug.7, 1962:

(TW refers to "This Week's" ratings and, of course, LW refers to the song's standing the previous week).

 


                                                                         
 TW                                                             LW
  1. The Loco-Motion - Little Eva (Dimension)      *2 weeks #1*  1
  2. Roses Are Red (My Love) - Bobby Vinton (Epic)               2
  3. Breaking Up is Hard to Do - Neil Sedaka (RCA)               5
  4. The Wah Watusi - The Orlons (Cameo)                         3
  5. Twist and Shout - The Isley Brothers (Wand)                 4
  6. You'll Lose a Good Thing - Barbara Lynn (Jamie)             7
  7. You Belong to Me - The Duprees (Coed)                      11
 *8. Sealed With a Kiss - Brian Hyland (ABC-Paramount)           9
  9. Sheila - Tommy Roe (ABC-Paramount)                         14
 10. Ahab the Arab - Ray Stevens (Mercury)                      16
 11. Bring It on Home to Me - Sam Cooke (RCA)                   15
 12. Speedy Gonzalez - Pat Boone (Dot)                           6
 13. Wolverton Mountain - Claude King (Columbia)                10
 14. Party Lights - Claudine Clark (Chancellor)                 12
 15. I Can't Stop Loving You - Ray Charles (ABC-Paramount)      17
 16. You Don't Know Me - Ray Charles (ABC-Paramount)            23
 17. The Stripper - David Rose & his Orchestra (MGM)             8
 18. Things - Bobby Darin (Atco)                                36
 19. Having a Party - Sam Cooke (RCA)                           24
 20. Little Diane - Dion (Laurie)                               18
 21. I Need Your Loving - Don Gardner & Dee Dee Ford (Fire)     13
*22. Ramblin' Rose - Nat "King" Cole (Capitol)                  32
 23. (Girls, Girls, Girls) Made to Love - Eddie Hodges (Cadence)31
 24. Johnny Get Angry - Joanie Sommers (Warner Brothers)        20
 25. Theme From Dr. Kildare - Richard Chamberlain (MGM)         22
*26. Dancin' Party - Chubby Checker (Parkway)                   19
 27. Gravy (For My Mashed Potatoes) - Dee Dee Sharp (Cameo)     21
 28. Call Me Mr. In-Between - Burl Ives (Decca)                 39
*29. Vacation - Connie Francis (MGM)                            29
 30. I Love You the Way You Are - Bobby Vinton (Diamond)        26
 31. Stop the Wedding - Etta James (Argo)                       --
 32. Come On Little Angel - The Belmonts (Sabina)               --
 33. Reap What You Sow - Billy Stewart (Chess)                  25
 34. Limbo Rock - The Champs (Challenge)                        28
*35. Till There Was You - Valjean (Carlton)                     40
 36. My Daddy Is President - Little Jo Ann (Kapp)               --
 37. Glory of Love - Don Gardner & Dee Dee Ford (KC)            35
*38. Have a Good Time - Sue Thompson (Hickory)                  27
 39. Route 66 Theme - Nelson Riddle (Capitol)                   --
*40. I've Got My Eyes on You/Teen Age Idol -                      
                                   
     

40 songs.  +/- three minutes each.  120 minutes.  

60 minutes in an hour.  24 hours a day.  1440 minutes a day.

Each song will be heard twelve times a day.

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15 minutes ago, slaytonf said:

Each song will be heard twelve times a day.

Yup. That's almost right. Give or take the five minutes they deigned to forfeit for news breaks only because FCC demanded it. Oh, let's not forget commercial breaks.

P.S. After posting and reviewing that list I can't get the "Theme From Dr. Kildare" by Richard Chamberlain out of my head. Damn!

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51 minutes ago, Zea said:

Yup. That's almost right. Give or take the five minutes they deigned to forfeit for news breaks only because FCC demanded it. Oh, let's not forget commercial breaks.

P.S. After posting and reviewing that list I can't get the "Theme From Dr. Kildare" by Richard Chamberlain out of my head. Damn!

I completely forgot about commercials.  Make that: each song will be heard six times a day.

To get rid of that theme, try substituting it with Ray Charles' "You Don't Know Me."  That's the best one on the list.

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11 minutes ago, slaytonf said:

I completely forgot about commercials.  Make that: each song will be heard six times a day.

To get rid of that theme, try substituting it with Ray Charles' "You Don't Know Me."  That's the best one on the list.

Gotta love Nelson Riddle's theme from the CBS television series "Route 66." One of the best TV songs ever.

 

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Not bad, but if I had to have something running around in my head, I'd prefer it to be Ray Charles.

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I remember when some had an issue with the film The Sting (1973), and its soundtrack being mostly Scott Joplin rags from the turn of the last century. 30 years before the film was set.

It couldn't have been too much of an issue because that film brought new popularity to Joplin and Ragtime music which became quite popular in the 1970's.

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7 hours ago, Zea said:

From the late 60's to early 70's I worked at WABC-AM "Musicradio" in NYC.  Yeah, alongside the late Dan Ingram, Lundy, Harrison & Cousin Brucie, well before ABC pulled the plug on the music in '83 to go all talk.

The DJ's recirculated 40 songs per day.  Hence the phrase "Top 40's". Each music list was configured at a music meeting each Monday by the entire staff & DJs according to what songs were highest rated in Billboard and other music ratings' venues that week. Usually the last couple or few songs were either a particular DJ's wild-card favorite or one of the general staff's.

Although '62 was a few years before my tenure there, I'm able to access many music lists from various times.  Here, for example, is a typical week's music programming for the week of Aug.7, 1962:

(TW refers to "This Week's" ratings and, of course, LW refers to the song's standing the previous week).

 


                                                                         
 TW                                                             LW
  1. The Loco-Motion - Little Eva (Dimension)      *2 weeks #1*  1
  2. Roses Are Red (My Love) - Bobby Vinton (Epic)               2
  3. Breaking Up is Hard to Do - Neil Sedaka (RCA)               5
  4. The Wah Watusi - The Orlons (Cameo)                         3
  5. Twist and Shout - The Isley Brothers (Wand)                 4
  6. You'll Lose a Good Thing - Barbara Lynn (Jamie)             7
  7. You Belong to Me - The Duprees (Coed)                      11
 *8. Sealed With a Kiss - Brian Hyland (ABC-Paramount)           9
  9. Sheila - Tommy Roe (ABC-Paramount)                         14
 10. Ahab the Arab - Ray Stevens (Mercury)                      16
 11. Bring It on Home to Me - Sam Cooke (RCA)                   15
 12. Speedy Gonzalez - Pat Boone (Dot)                           6
 13. Wolverton Mountain - Claude King (Columbia)                10
 14. Party Lights - Claudine Clark (Chancellor)                 12
 15. I Can't Stop Loving You - Ray Charles (ABC-Paramount)      17
 16. You Don't Know Me - Ray Charles (ABC-Paramount)            23
 17. The Stripper - David Rose & his Orchestra (MGM)             8
 18. Things - Bobby Darin (Atco)                                36
 19. Having a Party - Sam Cooke (RCA)                           24
 20. Little Diane - Dion (Laurie)                               18
 21. I Need Your Loving - Don Gardner & Dee Dee Ford (Fire)     13
*22. Ramblin' Rose - Nat "King" Cole (Capitol)                  32
 23. (Girls, Girls, Girls) Made to Love - Eddie Hodges (Cadence)31
 24. Johnny Get Angry - Joanie Sommers (Warner Brothers)        20
 25. Theme From Dr. Kildare - Richard Chamberlain (MGM)         22
*26. Dancin' Party - Chubby Checker (Parkway)                   19
 27. Gravy (For My Mashed Potatoes) - Dee Dee Sharp (Cameo)     21
 28. Call Me Mr. In-Between - Burl Ives (Decca)                 39
*29. Vacation - Connie Francis (MGM)                            29
 30. I Love You the Way You Are - Bobby Vinton (Diamond)        26
 31. Stop the Wedding - Etta James (Argo)                       --
 32. Come On Little Angel - The Belmonts (Sabina)               --
 33. Reap What You Sow - Billy Stewart (Chess)                  25
 34. Limbo Rock - The Champs (Challenge)                        28
*35. Till There Was You - Valjean (Carlton)                     40
 36. My Daddy Is President - Little Jo Ann (Kapp)               --
 37. Glory of Love - Don Gardner & Dee Dee Ford (KC)            35
*38. Have a Good Time - Sue Thompson (Hickory)                  27
 39. Route 66 Theme - Nelson Riddle (Capitol)                   --
*40. I've Got My Eyes on You/Teen Age Idol -                      
                                   
     

There's an internet station I listen to from time to time called "24-7 Dreamboats and Petticoats", (based on a UK play of the same name), that plays only music from 1957-1963 or so. I hear many of the songs on that list there regularly.

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15 hours ago, Zea said:

The DJ's recirculated 40 songs per day.  Hence the phrase "Top 40's".


                                                                         

  4. The Wah Watusi - The Orlons (Cameo)                         3

 10. Ahab the Arab - Ray Stevens (Mercury)                      16

 12. Speedy Gonzalez - Pat Boone (Dot)                           6

 36. My Daddy Is President - Little Jo Ann (Kapp)               --   

Ah, I knew what top 40 meant, but didn't know you only played from that list!

Wow talk about politically "incorrect". Those titles would never fly these days. Poor Little JoAnn's song would be taken as a suicide note.

Well MY favorite on that list is David Rose's THE STRIPPER. I have several CDs of strip music with many versions of that song.  Wasn't he Judy Garland's husband? Second favorite is TIL THERE WAS YOU although I can't imagine it being a hit. Nor can I picture Burl Ives being on Top 40 in the 60's.

Just goes to show decades "culture" is from the half decade to half decade...in other words 1955-1965 was one style of clothing/music/design and 1965-1975 was wholly different culturally. 

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Yeah, I too noticed the "mid decade" thing for a while now.  But it wasn't strictly precise, as there was NO similarity in both music AND fashion in 1955 and then 1965.  And too, a BIG difference between '65 and '75!  ;)

"The Stripper"?  Sure.  Liked that tune when it was an AM "hit", but grew to dislike it after doing wedding photography for only a half year in.  DJ's invariably use the tune at the "garter toss" removal and placement times.  At least a nephew of mine had a DJ at his wedding with a different approach for that "tradition".  He instead used the tune "I Know What Boys Like" by The Waitresses.  ;)

 

Sepiatone

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5 hours ago, TikiSoo said:

Well MY favorite on that list is David Rose's THE STRIPPER. I have several CDs of strip music with many versions of that song.  Wasn't he Judy Garland's husband?

Rose was wedded to Garland from  1941 to 1944 -- after his marriage to Martha Raye and before Garland's relationship with Vincente Minnelli.

Image result for david rose and judy garland

The multi-talented Rose was the longtime musical director for Red Skelton's TV variety shows on CBS and NBC. And he wrote Skelton's theme song "Holiday for Strings."

 

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On 10/12/2018 at 10:24 AM, BingFan said:

According to Wikipedia, American Graffiti is set at the beginning of Sept. 1962, right at the end of the summer.  Also according to Wikipedia, all of the songs in the movie except one were released by then.  The one exception is the last song in the movie, "All Summer Long" by the Beach Boys, which was released in 1964. 

I don't like this kind of historical anachronism myself, but in this case, I'm willing to give it a pass.  For me, "All Summer Long" has exactly the right spirit for that point in the movie.

I'm dredging this up again because something I saw this morning made me wonder.....

 

In a rerun of an old LEAVE IT TO BEAVER episode this morning, originally aired in 1963, an episode called "Wally's Practical Joke",.....

It all started with Clarence(Lumpy) Rutherford placing one of those whistling smoke bombs( remember those?) in both Eddy and Wally's cars.  So, to get back at Lumpy, Eddy comes up with an idea.....

Have Wally get ahold of his Dad's tow chain, wrap one end around Lumpy's car's differential and the other end around a nearby tree.  So when Lumpy tries to drive off, the car goes nowhere.  They think this will just drive him nuts.  But.....

When Eddy calls Lumpy, disguising his voice and claims to be some girl that wants Lumpy to come over and help with some schoolwork, Lumpy jumps into his car and starts down his driveway.  The boys left too much slack in the chain, and so after a short distance, Lumpy's Car differential gets ripped out of the bottom of his car and the car sits with the back wheels missing, in the middle of the street.  :o

Sound familiar......?   :D 

Y'all don't suppose it was one of GEORGE LUCAS' favorite "Beaver" episodes, do ya?  ;)

Sepiatone

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Can't speak for Lucas but I was never a big "Beaver" fan myself, except for this particular episode:

 

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10 hours ago, Sepiatone said:

I'm dredging this up again because something I saw this morning made me wonder.....

 

In a rerun of an old LEAVE IT TO BEAVER episode this morning, originally aired in 1963, an episode called "Wally's Practical Joke",.....

It all started with Clarence(Lumpy) Rutherford placing one of those whistling smoke bombs( remember those?) in both Eddy and Wally's cars.  So, to get back at Lumpy, Eddy comes up with an idea.....

Have Wally get ahold of his Dad's tow chain, wrap one end around Lumpy's car's differential and the other end around a nearby tree.  So when Lumpy tries to drive off, the car goes nowhere.  They think this will just drive him nuts.  But.....

When Eddy calls Lumpy, disguising his voice and claims to be some girl that wants Lumpy to come over and help with some schoolwork, Lumpy jumps into his car and starts down his driveway.  The boys left too much slack in the chain, and so after a short distance, Lumpy's Car differential gets ripped out of the bottom of his car and the car sits with the back wheels missing, in the middle of the street.  :o

Sound familiar......?   :D 

Y'all don't suppose it was one of GEORGE LUCAS' favorite "Beaver" episodes, do ya?  ;)

Sepiatone

LOL

Yeah but ironically Sepia, in that episode doesn't Eddie tell Wally that he got the idea for that whole thing while visiting his Aunt Hattie and Uncle Frank the summer before in Modesto California?!

AND, after witnessing it firsthand while cruising around Modesto in his Aunt and Uncle's 1959 Rambler American late one night there? WHICH of course he took WITHOUT their consent?!

(...okay, maybe not)  ;)

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On 10/15/2018 at 11:52 AM, Sepiatone said:

...In a rerun of an old LEAVE IT TO BEAVER episode this morning, originally aired in 1963, an episode called "Wally's Practical Joke",.....

It all started with Clarence(Lumpy) Rutherford placing one of those whistling smoke bombs( remember those?) in both Eddy and Wally's cars.  So, to get back at Lumpy, Eddy comes up with an idea.....

Have Wally get ahold of his Dad's tow chain, wrap one end around Lumpy's car's differential and the other end around a nearby tree.  So when Lumpy tries to drive off, the car goes nowhere.  They think this will just drive him nuts.  But.....

When Eddy calls Lumpy, disguising his voice and claims to be some girl that wants Lumpy to come over and help with some schoolwork, Lumpy jumps into his car and starts down his driveway.  The boys left too much slack in the chain, and so after a short distance, Lumpy's Car differential gets ripped out of the bottom of his car and the car sits with the back wheels missing, in the middle of the street.  :o

Sound familiar......?   :D 

Y'all don't suppose it was one of GEORGE LUCAS' favorite "Beaver" episodes, do ya?  ;)

Sepiatone

I'm a big, big fan of both Leave It To Beaver and American Graffiti, but I never thought about the identical prank being featured in both -- thanks for making that connection!  Maybe this was a well-known prank in the early 60s, one that both the LITB writers and George Lucas would have been familiar with. 

Here are Fred and Lumpy Rutherford examining the car, post-prank:

wally05.jpg.6b1f8c09d4838bca7a99af8942a5f045.jpg

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1 hour ago, BingFan said:

I'm a big, big fan of both Leave It To Beaver and American Graffiti, but I never thought about the identical prank being featured in both -- thanks for making that connection!  Maybe this was a well-known prank in the early 60s, one that both the LITB writers and George Lucas would have been familiar with. 

Here are Fred and Lumpy Rutherford examining the car, post-prank:

wally05.jpg.6b1f8c09d4838bca7a99af8942a5f045.jpg

Yeah, and yet in ANOTHER foreshadowing of things to come here...I believe the two onlookers standing on the sidewalk across the street there are Carl Reiner and Mory Amsterdam!

Get IT?! Richard Deacon there would go on to play..........

(...oh never mind...these can't ALL be knee-slappers, ya know)

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I used to listen to WABC in the mid 1960s before switching over to WNEW-FM.

Sure they played the same several songs into the ground, but unless one listened

to WABC hour after hour it didn't make that much difference. You'd listen to it

on you car radio for a while when going somewhere, come out again and listen to

some of the same songs again. No biggie. Good old Cousin Bruceee.

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I suppose every big city "metro" area had their favorites among AM radio...

Here in the "D", ours were--- WXYZ, WJBK, WKMH( which later turned into WKNR). And too, listeners had both a favorite station AND DJ.  

MINE were WJBK and DJ MARC AVERY, who introducced me to The Beatles in Dec. '63.

Wasn't until the fall of '67 that we moved over to FM 'round these parts, with WABX being the only "underground" and "counterculture" station in town.  ;)

All those mentioned above alas. are long gone now.  WXYZ changed to WXYT, and became one of those right-wing talk stations in the '80's, and since then became an all sports station, with all the local sports teams having home games broadcast on it.  Both it and it's FM sister...

WJBK  became a Christian broadcasting station, same frequency, but different "call" letters;

WKNR in the '70's switched to an "easy listening" format and became WNIC (they pronounced it "nice") and is STILL putting people asleep.  ;)

Sepiatone

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