cigarjoe

Newspaper Noirs

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Noirs concerning/featuring reporters, newsmen, columnists, photogs. They may be a few more....

The Newspaper Noirs

Stranger on the Third Floor (1940) - seen

The Glass Alibi (1946)

Big Town After Dark (1947)

Call Northside 777 (1948) - seen

Blonde Ice (1948)

Abandoned (1949) - seen 

All the King's Men (1949) - seen

Chicago Deadline (1949) - seen

Woman On The Run (1950) - seen 

Shakedown (1950)

Ace In The Hole (1951) - seen

Scandal Sheet (1952) - seen

The Blue Gardenia (1953) - seen

The Phenix City Story (1955) - seen

The Big Tip Off (1955)

Beyond a Reasonable Doubt (1956) - seen

Hot Summer Night (1957)

Sweet Smell Of Success (1957) - seen

I Want to Live! (1958) - seen

Screaming Mimi (1958) - seen

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Hum. Good call. But no, even as good as that title is, (Deadline USA) I am sure I can think of some others. The thread is almost 'closed' at the start by the list given. None of these are NOIR!

Oh well.

-30- by Jack Webb. Let's hear it.

Or, 'Call Northside 777'.

Even 'Capricorn One' deserves mention.

'Parallax View'? 'The Big Clock'?

Are you doing this just to rile me?? What is the matter with you? ^_^

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7 hours ago, Sgt_Markoff said:

Hum. Good call. But no, even as good as that title is, (Deadline USA) I am sure I can think of some others. The thread is almost 'closed' at the start by the list given. None of these are NOIR!

Oh well.

-30- by Jack Webb. Let's hear it.

Or, 'Call Northside 77".

Even 'Capricorn One' deserves mention.

'Parallax View'?

Are you doing this just to rile me?? What is the matter with you?

Predictable answer. Accept that other people have formed different definitions of Noir. 

Again noir, is SUBJECTIVE it doesn't fit in any pigeon hole, it's obviously why there are so many opinions about it. I've seen Noir lists that contain as little as a hundred and as many as 3,000+ (John Grant's A Comprehensive Encyclopedia of Film Noir, as a caveat he does include foreign films though) and even that list missed some obvious ones and listed some that I personally didn't "tune" to. 

 

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I doubt that these qualify as noir, but I'll mention them anyway:

Picture Snatcher (1933)

The Murder Man (1935)

The Torchy Blane films.

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I doubt that these qualify as noir, but I'll mention them anyway:

You needn't have worried. Almost no newspaper film (not unless titled, 'Ace in the Hole') qualifies as noir... :huh:

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So I suppose that college crony I had once--the toff who majored in 'noir studies' (graduate level) could have simply took a degree in falling snowflakes instead, or maybe chaos theory or something.

That's what we should surmise; seeing as how all 'film noir' is so utterly random and serendipitous, happens so unconsciously rather than deliberately, ...bearing in mind how easily it "emerges as whimsy" ...recognizing, how it is "entirely based on the unpredictable" and ...assembled by "will-o'-the-wisp" players ..."thrown together impromptu" and "putting their heads together". (His degree cost him at least 100 grand, I know that much. Oh, what a fool he was!)

Heck, maybe I'm in a noir myself --right now --simply by browsing this forum; maybe I'm suffering from amnesia, maybe this is all a dream, maybe I imagined that friend from years ago, maybe I imagined that school's film department; maybe I hallucinated all the thick textbooks on his shelf.

A contemporary director (one 'enamored' of noir) certainly might choose to shoot my plight and dilemma that way. "Noir-ishly"; using tropes selected by pure happenstance; [That's of course, the way all noirs always come into being. Via someone's penchant for it; like a taste for almond gaunache].

But that eerie bookshelf I encountered once. H'mmm...how did it take shape? I wonder. Rows and rows of noir research.

Incredible in retrospect; because naturally no film critics could ever have found very much to say or publish about such a vague, loose, 'random cinematic style'. How could anyone 'study' something that merely..."happened to crop up occasionally" in film history ....hidden deeply among hit musicals, westerns, hit comedies, and whatnot.

Such an array of books wouldn't ever have been published. Instead, research analyzing...oh, maybe the history of snack food in American cinema, or wars between prop departments at the Big Six would have whetted publishers' appetites more. Yes, I'm sure wherever that former student is now, he probably had to switch his degree; there just wouldnt have been enough material for him to 'graduate in noir studies'. How preposterous....

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Preposterous is correct, NOIR IS A STYLE no amount of you bloviating about your old "crony" is going to change my opinion, get it. 😎:D

I've got a bookshelf full of Noir tomes myself, big deal.

 

1 hour ago, Sgt_Markoff said:

(His degree cost him at least 100 grand, I know that much. Oh, what a fool he was!)

P.S. I've had pieces published in the New York Times since you seem so impressed by crap like that.....🙄

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13 minutes ago, TopBilled said:

I wanted to mention that DEADLINE U.S.A. is currently on YouTube.

Thanks

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The 1950's  The Underworld Story is a film that to me falls under Newspaper noir. 

It stars iconic noir actor Dan Duryea and Herbert Marshall,  Gale Storm and in one of his last roles before being blacklisted Howard De Silva doing the best work in the film as a gangster.    Of course the casting of Mary Anderson as a black women is odd.   (the 'n' word is used in the film but often that is cut out depending on who is broadcasting it).

 

 

 

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2 minutes ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

The 1950's  The Underworld Story is a film that to me falls under Newspaper noir. 

It stars iconic noir actor Dan Duryea and Herbert Marshall,  Gale Storm and in one of his last roles before being blacklisted Howard De Silva doing the best work in the film as a gangster.    Of course the casting of Mary Anderson as a black women is odd.   (the 'n' word is used in the film but often that is cut out depending on who is broadcasting it).

 

 

 

I've seen it but don't remember much about it.

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no amount of you bloviating about your old "crony" is going to change my opinion,

I'm not trying to change your opinion. I don't care what's in your brain. You're perfectly well entitled to an incorrect opinion, as Jefferson famously proclaimed.

Rather, I focus on the form of the arguments you're using. Let the caliber of the argument speak for itself. I do this with anyone, in any debate, no matter the topic. B)

In this case, you're relying on abduction or induction instead of deduction. Often even less than that.

Truly, I might be satisfied and contented, if I saw a really strong argument for what you're stating. (Do you know anywhere in film studies where anyone reinforces your conclusions? I'd be glad to hear who)

What I see instead, is a mere repetition of titles-as-exemplars but without enlisting them to support an argument. "This one thing looks like this other thing" is not a systemic analysis; it's just an inventory. It doesn't say, "how one thing comes to be" vs "how another thing comes to be"; or "what is this thing?"--it assumes everything originates from the same cause. :(

But back to my camrade. What his situation shows is this: a school film department wouldn't even be able to create a degree field in something that had no more recommendation for it than what you're suggesting. There wouldn't be any body of academic writing on noir, if it were such a loosely dispersed and thinly-spread phenomenon.

The difference between such a degree vs merely consuming random, popular-market coffee-table books is that the student fact-finds and discovers what is valid in the literature of the field. He takes up a position and defends it; rather than just 'absorbing all the opinions' ...'regurgitating them back out'...and letting it go at that.

p.s.  The New York Times is not an academic body :huh:

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The reason 'newspaper noir' is a misnomer is because the 'disaster' which the protagonist is usually trying to forestall in these yarns, is the demise of the newspaper itself, or perhaps a big story, or maybe his job, or maybe the outcome of a trial, or maybe several other "external concerns" completely unrelated to him, his self, his fate, his life.

This is not a checklist argument; its a functional one. Stories which focus on "hero's fate" are intrinsically different than stories where "something-else-is-the-goal".

Film 'Noir' is arguably a modern updating of Greek tragedy in the way it handles ...well, the concept of 'nemesis'. Naturally, Tragedy is not "lumped under" poor-relation "genres" as a mere stylistic choice.

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1 hour ago, Sgt_Markoff said:

You're perfectly well entitled to an incorrect opinion, as Jefferson famously proclaimed.

Ditto

I stopped reading right there. Give up

Noir Is a Style not a genre. End of discussion.

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Sometimes I think that the phrase "film noir" was coined by someone who wanted to promote 1940s and 1950s thrillers. If that's the case, sure worked!

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12 hours ago, kjrwe said:

Sometimes I think that the phrase "film noir" was coined by someone who wanted to promote 1940s and 1950s thrillers. If that's the case, sure worked!

It literally translates from the French as "black film." In America black films are considered to be those about the African American culture.

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4 hours ago, kjrwe said:

Sometimes I think that the phrase "film noir" was coined by someone who wanted to promote 1940s and 1950s thrillers. If that's the case, sure worked!

Actually kjrwe, before the French critics revived the term Film Noir after WWII, The New York Times was labeling the films as being part of, what they were calling at the time, the "Red Meat Crime Cycle."

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