Hoganman1

Top Ten Favorite Movies

35 posts in this topic

I'm sure this has been done before, but I'm interested in hearing about your favorites. Here are mine: 1. Casablanca 2. Butch Cassidy and The Sundance Kid 3. The Usual Suspects 4. Tombstone 5. Chinatown 6. LA Confidential 7. The Untouchables 8. The Wizard of Oz 9. Man on Fire (Denzel Washington version) 10. The Godfather I and II (I know that makes eleven, but hey; it's my thread)

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have my top ten favorite movies at this moment list.  Ask me tomorrow and I will give you ten different movies. 

I, too, will cheat with my first listed favorite movie because I consider this movie, a trilogy, one movie.  Similar plot in all three movies working toward a goal to bring closure to wrong-doing and injustice.

1.  The Lord of the Rings trilogy

2.  Unforgiven

3.  Felicia's Journey

4.  Run Lola Run

5. The Day of the Jackal (1973)

6. The Apartment

7. Mrs. Miniver

8.  City Lights

9.  The Searchers

10. Sunnyside Up

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Mine are in chronological order:

 

1. Gunga Din (1939) greatest action adventure film ever made. Cary Grant, Victor McLaglen and Douglas Fairbanks Jr are heroic and funny.

2. Shadow Of A Doubt (1943) my favorite Hitchcock film. Teresa Wright is a spunky heroine and Joseph Cotten is one of the greatest villains of all time.

3. Detective Story (1951) A tough character study, Kirk Douglas's greatest performance and the best portrayal of police work on film.

4. From Here To Eternity (1953) An engrossing story of soldiers just before WWII with Montgomery Clift's best performance.

5. On The Waterfront (1954) An excellent look at corruption and conscience with gritty real locations and Marlon Brando gives the greatest male performance i have seen on film.

6. Marty (1955) Ernest Borgnine is excellent as the average guy looking for love. The most realistic view of ordinary people I have ever seen.

7. Night Of The Hunter (1955) A masterpiece of suspense with great Charles Laughton direction, stunning photography and a frightening portrayal by Robert Mitchum.

8. Rosemary's Baby (1968) My favorite horror film, the suspense builds to a horrifying climax. Mia Farrow is excellent and sympathetic.

9. Midnight Cowboy (1969) great look at 1960s New York with greatest double lead performances in a film by Jon Voight and Dustin Hoffman.

10. Taxi Driver (1976) A disturbing and fascinating look at crime and madness in gritty and dangerous 1970s New York. Robert DeNiro's greatest performance.

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

1. SUNSET BOULEVARD 1950

2. ALL ABOUT EVE 1950

3. INTOLERANCE 1916

4. SHOW PEOPLE 1928

5. THE RED SHOES 1948

6. SINGIN' IN THE RAIN 1952

7. LITTLE OLD NEW YORK 1923

8. THE MISFITS 1961

9. HUMORESQUE 1946

10. ANNIE HALL 1977

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This IS hard, but here goes:

1(a) "The Godfather" (1972) -- Francis Ford Coppola's Oscar-winning masterpiece about the dark side of the American dream. Favorite scene: The camera zooms in on Michael Corleone (Al Pacino) as he proposes a bold and brilliant plan for revenge.

1(b) "The Godfather Part II" (1974) -- The first sequel to a Best Picture winner to receive the top Oscar, too. Favorite scene: The young Vito Corleone (Robert De Niro) trails his quarry -- the neighborhood parasite Don Fanucci ("The Black Hand") -- from the rooftops during the Feast of San Rocco.

Related image

2. "Casablanca" (1942) -- Perhaps the most quotable movie of all time. My favorite lines are below, as Rick Blaine (Humphrey Bogart) has an unexpected reunion with former lover Ilsa Lund Laszlo (Ingrid Bergman):

Image result for casablanca images the germans wore gray. You wore blue

3. "In the Heat of the Night" (1967) -- A socially significant film by director Norman Jewison that still resonates. It won the Academy Award for Best Picture on April 10, 1968 -- six days after the assassination of the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Sidney Poitier stars as an ultra-cool black detective from Philadelphia PA who's dragged into a murder mystery in a racist Mississippi town. Rod Steiger (in his Oscar-winning performance as the local police chief) chews gum as well as most of the scenery.

Favorite scene: A prosperous Mississippi planter (Larry Gates) strikes Poitier's character, Virgil Tibbs, during questioning. Tibbs doesn't miss a beat and slaps him back.

Related image

4. "Saving Private Ryan" (1998) -- Steven Spielberg's tribute to the American fighting men of World War II. Favorite scene: A mortally wounded U.S. Army Captain John H. Miller (Tom Hanks) desperately fires his pistol at an approaching German tank until it explodes. Seconds later, he realizes he didn't cause the explosion.

5. "North By Northwest" (1959) -- The best Hitchcock thriller about a man wrongly accused of a crime. The film also features Cary Grant at his best.

Favorite scene: No surprise here.

6. "All the President's Men" (1976) -- Director Alan J. Pakula's real-life drama about Bob Woodward (Robert Redford) and Carl Bernstein (Dustin Hoffman) -- the mismatched reporters for The Washington Post assigned to cover the Watergate case. Between the break-in on June 17, 1972 and President Richard M. Nixon's resignation on August 9, 1974, the duo broke several significant stories that linked the White House to the ill-fated burglary attempt at the Watergate apartment complex in Washington, D.C.

Favorite scenes: Woodward puts in some serious time on the telephone in pursuit of answers about the mysterious break-in.

Image result for all the president's men telephone

7. "Fanny and Alexander" (1982) -- Ingmar Bergman's semi-autobiographical masterpiece about childhood in early 20th-century Sweden won four Academy Awards: Best Foreign Language Film, Best Cinematography (Sven Nykvist), Best Art Direction (Anna Asp, Susanne Lingheim) and Best Costume Design (Marik Vos-Lundh). Bergman also received nominations for Best Director and Best Original Screenplay.

It is the story of the Ekdahl siblings -- Fanny (Pernilla Allwin) and Alexander (Bertil Guve) -- and their colorful extended family. The film is a sumptuous delight, from the scenes at the theater run by the children's parents to the Christmas celebration presided over by the Ekdahl family matriarch (Gun Wållgren). 

Image result for fanny and alexander images

8. "Taxi Driver" (1976) -- The second of nine screen collaborations between director Martin Scorsese and actor De Niro (there will be a 10th in 2019). De Niro earned his first Best Actor Oscar nomination as the title character who gradually goes mad in New York City. I've always remembered film critic Vincent Canby's description in The New York Times of the steam-filled opening credits sequence: "Manhattan is a thin cement lid over the entrance to hell, and the lid is full of cracks."

The film's memorable score was the last composition by the great Bernard Herrmann, who died on Christmas Eve in 1975 -- about six weeks before the movie's release.

9. "Citizen Kane" (1941) -- It's hard to believe that Orson Welles co-wrote, produced, directed and starred in this film when he was only 25. The influential drama -- about the death and life of a powerful newspaper czar -- was based on the career of the real-life media mogul William Randolph Hearst as well as his relationship with his paramour, the actress Marion Davies. 

Favorite scenes: A flashback featuring a series of flashforwards sums up the relationship between Kane (played by Welles) and his first wife Emily (Ruth Warrick). Each segment shows the Kanes at a dining-room table, ranging from their early days as lovebirds to a time when they're not speaking at all.

10. "Body Heat" (1981) - Writer-director Lawrence Kasdan's neo-noir effort featured early screen appearances by William Hurt, Kathleen Turner (her first film role), Mickey Rourke and Ted Danson. In the steamy and stylish drama -- a throwback to Billy Wilder's "Double Indemnity" (1944) -- the married seductress Matty Walker (Turner) persuades attorney Ned Racine (Hurt) to help her get rid of her older husband (Richard Crenna). The film, set in a small Florida town in 1981, featured a jazzy score by the great composer John Barry.

Related image

HONORABLE MENTION: "La Belle et la Bête" (1946, or "Beauty and the Beast"). The French poet, artist, writer and filmmaker Jean Cocteau's fanciful and surrealistic version of the 18th-century fairy tale is an unforgettable viewing experience. Josette Day stars as the maiden Belle, who must fulfill a pact to reside at the enchanted castle of a leonine creature (played by Cocteau's longtime collaborator Jean Marais. The actor also appears as two other characters in the film). 

Image result for la belle et la bete 1946 gif

HONORABLE MENTION: "Back to the Future" (1985) -- Many tales about time travel have taken the approach that past events can never be altered. The clever screenplay by writer-director Robert Zemeckis and co-writer Bob Gale threw that concept out the window. Michael J. Fox starred as a 1980s California teen who finds himself trapped in the 1950s -- thanks to a gull-winged DeLorean sports car that had been converted into a plutonium-powered time machine. In his quest to get back to 1985, the youth winds up changing the past (and therefore his own timeline) on several occasions.

Related image

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My list is always evolving.  Whenever I make these lists, they're always how I feel in the moment.

1. The Long, Long Trailer (This will always be my #1)

2. Casablanca

3. Gidget (1959)

4. Gentleman Jim

5. Rear Window

6. Gilda

7. Singin' in the Rain

8. The More the Merrier

9. Picnic

10. Where the Boys Are

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

1.) the shining (1980)
2.) the french connection (1971)
3.) The godfather: part II (1974)
4.) paths of glory (1957)
5.) dog day afternoon (1975)
6.) the bad news bears (1976)
7.) the royal tenenbaums (2001)
8.) a hard day's night (1964)
9.) the 400 blows (1959)
10.) one flew over the cuckoo's nest (1975)

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

266px-Modern_Times_poster.jpg

1.) Modern Times (1936)

2.) 2001: A Space Odyssey (1968)

3.) McCabe & Mrs. Miller (1971)

4.) The Pervert's Guide to Ideology (2012)/ Pervert's Guide to Cinema (2006)

5.) The Good, the Bad and the Ugly (1966)

6.) Cannibal Holocaust (1980)

7.) The Lavender Hill Mob (1951)

8.) Halloween (1978)

9.) Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me (1992)

10.) Stalker (1979)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
13 minutes ago, Gershwin fan said:

6.) Cannibal Holocaust (1980)!!!!!!!!

The juxtaposition of someone with the screen name "Gershwin fan" and the avatar of Stan Laurel, also having Cannibal Holocaust among their top ten favorite movies, is simply amazing. I wholeheartedly approve. 

  • Haha 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
55 minutes ago, LawrenceA said:

The juxtaposition of someone with the screen name "Gershwin fan" and the avatar of Stan Laurel, also having Cannibal Holocaust among their top ten favorite movies, is simply amazing. I wholeheartedly approve. 

I think it is the ultimate film of the exploitation genre and has a very good social message that unfortunately is overshadowed by its notorious content. "I wonder who the real cannibals are." Some other runners up to my top 10 would be: Beau Hunks (1931), the Star (2002), Goldfinger (1964) and North by Northwest (1959).

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yeah, like someone else said, mine too, is "always evolving".  So, off the top of my heard, I can come up with---

CITIZEN KANE

GRAPES OF WRATH

REAR WINDOW

THE DAY THE EARTH STOOD STILL

SCROOGE( aka A Christmas Carol( '51) )

THE WIZARD OF OZ

THE MAN WHO SHOT LIBERTY VALANCE

THE ODD COUPLE

COOL HAND LUKE

THE GODFATHER

In no particular order  ;)  ....... 

Sepiatone

Oh, and...

11.  LILIES OF THE FIELD   12.  TO KILL A MOCKINGBIRD.

I always feel a bit sad for those individuals, with so MANY fine choices at hand, that can judiciously limit their lists to only a mere 10 or some other arbitrary number.  :( 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

These lists are great. I already want to change a couple of mine. Also, there are several that I've never seen. I'll have to search for them. I'm especially interested in learning more about CANNIBAL HOLOCAUST. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I’m going to stick with classic movies for this list because I just can’t choose between the later ones I like.  It’s like not enough time has passed. In no order:

 

The Ghost and Mrs. Muir

Forbidden Planet

Murder My Sweet

The Big Sleep

Blithe Spirit

The Roaring Twenties

Angels with Dirty Faces

The Adventures of Robin Hood

Mr. Lucky

They Made Me a Criminal

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I can't rank them by preference, so I'll present them in chronological order instead:

  1. Captain Blood (1935)
  2. The Mark of Zorro (1940)
  3. Mary Poppins (1964)
  4. The Sting (1973)
  5. Star Wars (1977)
  6. Raiders of the Lost Ark (1981)
  7. TRON (1982)
  8. Pirates of the Caribbean: The Curse of the Black Pearl (2003)
  9. How To Train Your Dragon (2010)
  10. Frozen (2013)

That was hard!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Top Ten Favorites...are you kiddin'?

Just a few...

1. Casablanca 1942

2. The Best Years of Our Lives 1946

3. It's a Wonderful Life 1946

4. The Wizard of Oz 1939

5. The Kid 1921

6. Good Will Hunting 1997

7. Holiday Affair 1949

8. Mary Poppins 1964

9. Fifth Avenue Girl 1939

10. Fun on a Weekend 1947

11. Le Schpountz 1938

12. Monsieur Verdoux 1947

13. Das Boot 1981

14. M 1931

15. Lock Stock and Two Smoking Barrels 1998

16. The Goodfellas 1990

17. The Shawshank Redemption 1994

18. The Godfather 1972

19. Forrest Gump 1994

20. American Beauty 1999

21. Witness for the Prosecution 1957

22. The Apartment 1960

23. The Big Chill 1983

24. Grumpy Old Men 1993

25. The Treasure of the Sierra Madre 1948

26. The African Queen 1951

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On ‎11‎/‎5‎/‎2018 at 4:20 PM, jakeem said:

This IS hard, but here goes:

1(a) "The Godfather" (1972) -- Francis Ford Coppola's Oscar-winning masterpiece about the dark side of the American dream. Favorite scene: The camera zooms in on Michael Corleone (Al Pacino) as he proposes a bold and brilliant plan for revenge.

1(b) "The Godfather Part II" (1974) -- The first sequel to a Best Picture winner to receive the top Oscar, too. Favorite scene: The young Vito Corleone (Robert De Niro) trails his quarry -- the neighborhood parasite Don Fanucci ("The Black Hand") -- from the rooftops during the Feast of San Rocco.

Related image

2. "Casablanca" (1942) -- Perhaps the most quotable movie of all time. My favorite lines are from Rick Blaine (Humphrey Bogart) to Ilsa Lund Laszlo (Ingrid Bergman):

Image result for casablanca images the germans wore gray. You wore blue

3. "In the Heat of the Night" (1967) -- A socially significant film by director Norman Jewison that still resonates. It won the Academy Award for Best Picture on April 10, 1968 -- six days after the assassination of the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Sidney Poitier stars as an ultra-cool black detective from Philadelphia PA who's dragged into a murder mystery in a racist Mississippi town. Rod Steiger (in his Oscar-winning performance as the local police chief) chews gum as well as most of the scenery.

Favorite scene: A prosperous Mississippi planter (Larry Gates) strikes Poitier's character, Virgil Tibbs, during questioning. Tibbs doesn't miss a beat and slaps him back.

Related image

4. "Saving Private Ryan" (1998) -- Steven Spielberg's tribute to the American fighting men of World War II. Favorite scene: A mortally wounded U.S. Army Captain John H. Miller (Tom Hanks) desperately fires his pistol at an approaching German tank until it explodes. Seconds later, he realizes he didn't cause the explosion.

5. "North By Northwest" (1959) -- The best Hitchcock thriller about a man wrongly accused of a crime. The film also features Cary Grant at his best.

Favorite scene: No surprise here.

6. "All the President's Men" (1976) -- Director Alan J. Pakula's real-life drama about Bob Woodward (Robert Redford) and Carl Bernstein (Dustin Hoffman) -- the mismatched reporters for The Washington Post assigned to cover the Watergate case. Between the break-in on June 17, 1972 and President Richard M. Nixon's resignation on August 9, 1974, the duo broke several significant stories that linked the White House to the ill-fated burglary attempt at the Watergate apartment complex in Washington, D.C.

Favorite scenes: Woodward puts in some serious time on the telephone in pursuit of answers about the mysterious break-in.

Image result for all the president's men telephone

7. "Fanny and Alexander" (1982) -- Ingmar Bergman's semi-autobiographical masterpiece about childhood in early 20th-century Sweden won four Academy Awards: Best Foreign Language Film, Best Cinematography (Sven Nykvist), Best Art Direction (Anna Asp, Susanne Lingheim) and Best Costume Design (Marik Vos-Lundh). Bergman also received nominations for Best Director and Best Original Screenplay.

It is the story of the Ekdahl siblings -- Fanny (Pernilla Allwin) and Alexander (Bertil Guve) -- and their colorful extended family. The film is a sumptuous delight, from the scenes at the theater run by the children's parents to the Christmas celebration presided over by the Ekdahl family matriarch (Gun Wållgren). 

Image result for fanny and alexander images

8. "Taxi Driver" (1976) -- The second of nine screen collaborations between director Martin Scorsese and actor De Niro (there will be a 10th in 2019). De Niro earned his first Best Actor Oscar nomination as the title character who gradually goes mad in New York City. I've always remembered film critic Vincent Canby's description in The New York Times of the steam-filled opening credits sequence: "Manhattan is a thin cement lid over the entrance to hell, and the lid is full of cracks."

The film's memorable score was the last composition by the great Bernard Herrmann, who died on Christmas Eve in 1975 -- about six weeks before the movie's release.

9. "Citizen Kane" (1941) -- It's hard to believe that Orson Welles co-wrote, produced, directed and starred in this film when he was only 25. The influential drama -- about the death and life of a powerful newspaper czar -- was based on the career of the real-life media mogul William Randolph Hearst as well as his relationship with his paramour, the actress Marion Davies. 

Favorite scenes: A flashback featuring a series of flashforwards sums up the relationship between Kane (played by Welles) and his first wife Emily (Ruth Warrick). Each segment shows the Kanes at a dining-room table, ranging from their early days as lovebirds to a time when they're not speaking at all.

10. "Body Heat" (1981) - Writer-director Lawrence Kasdan's neo-noir effort featured early screen appearances by William Hurt, Kathleen Turner (her first film role), Mickey Rourke and Ted Danson. In the steamy and stylish drama -- a throwback to Billy Wilder's "Double Indemnity" (1944) -- the married seductress Matty Walker (Turner) persuades attorney Ned Racine (Hurt) to help her get rid of her older husband (Richard Crenna). The film, set in a small Florida town in 1981, featured a jazzy score by the great composer John Barry.

Related image

HONORABLE MENTION: "La Belle et la Bête" (1946, or "Beauty and the Beast"). The French poet, artist, writer and filmmaker Jean Cocteau's fanciful and surrealistic version of the 18th-century fairy tale is an unforgettable viewing experience. Josette Day stars as the maiden Belle, who must fulfill a pact to reside at the enchanted castle of a leonine creature (played by Cocteau's longtime collaborator Jean Marais. The actor also appears as two other characters in the film). 

Image result for la belle et la bete 1946 gif

HONORABLE MENTION: "Back to the Future" (1985) -- Many tales about time travel have taken the approach that past events can never be altered. The clever screenplay by writer-director Robert Zemeckis and co-writer Bob Gale threw that concept out the window. Michael J. Fox starred as a 1980s California teen who finds himself trapped in the 1950s -- thanks to a gull-winged DeLorean sports car that had been converted into a plutonium-powered time machine. In his quest to get back to 1985, the youth winds up changing the past (and therefore his own timeline) on several occasions.

Related image

EXCELLENT LIST & WORK PAL!  we agree on *THE GODFATHER, though KANE is still the greatest I've ever seen

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

JUST TRIED POSTING MINE & ONCE AGAIN GOT CUT-OFF?

 

What does it take, I constantly complain, but it still goes on & on

 

WHO ELSE HAS THIS ONGOING DILEMMA ON THESE FORUMS, I WASN'T LIKE THAT YEARS AGO

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Will try again  But as I just included I must separate my own all-time favs from actual greatest I've yet to see>

Top ten all-time favorite motion pictures (AKA: DVD Time Capsule) (*-always indicates Oscar winner)

1st *THE GODFATHER (l90l-90) TRILOGY (1992 non theatrical release)

2nd CITIZEN KANE (l941-RKO Radio)

3rd CAPTAINS COURAGEOUS (l937-MGM)

4th *CASABLANCA (l943-Warner Bros.)

5th fav CITY LIGHTS (l931-United Artists)

6. DUMBO (l94l-Walt Disney/RKO)

7. IT'S A WONDERFUL LIFDE (l946-RKO)

8. THE SEARCHERS (l956-WB's)

9. VERTIGO (1958-Paramount)

10th THE QUIET MAN (l952-Republic)

(Honorable mentions):

11th MODERN TIMES (l936-UA)

& 12th A NIGHT AT THE OPERA (l935-MGM)

 

AND  the top 10 all-time greatest I've ever seen:

1st place KANE

2nd *GFI (l972)

3rd *GFII (l974)

4th *CASABLANCA

5th place RAGING BULL (l980)

6th CITY LIGHTS

7th MODERN TIMES

8th VERTIGO

9th APOCALYPSE NOW (l979)

10th place *SCHINDLER'S LIST

& (Runners-Up):

11th place THE THIRD MAN (l950=Selznick./British)

& 12th best 2001: A SPACE ODYSSEY (l968-British)

 

THANKS

 

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

& just for us list fans & such, to compare with others on this one  AFI-(American Film Institute)-(Est: 1967-) & it's massive 1998 poll "100 Years...100 Movies  Only it's final top ten out of 100 films voted on>(PBS: These 2 specials are easy to buy online especially on Amazon)>

1st place KANE

2nd *CASABLANCA

3rd *GFI

4th *GONE WITH THE WIND (l939-Selznick/M-G-M)

5th place *LAWRENCE OF ARABIA (l962)

6th THE WIZARD OF OZ (l939-MGM)

7th THE GRADUATE (l967)

8th *ON THE WATERFRONT (l954-Columbia Pictures)

9th *SCHINDLER'S LIST

10th place SINGIN' IN THE RAIN

(Runners-Up):

11th place IT'S A WONDERFUL LIFE

& 12th place SUNSET BLVD (l950-=Paramount)

 

AND  AFI's "100 Years...100 Movies: 10th Anniversary Edition" (2007 poll):

1st place KANE

2nd *GFI

3rd *CASABLANCA

4th RAGING BULL

5th place SINGIN' IN THE RAIN

6. *GWTW

7. *LAWRENCE OF ARABIA

8. *SCHINDLER'S LIST

9. VERTIGO-(NOTE: Was voted up from #52nd  place in a decade)

& 10th place by AFI  *WIZARD OF OZ

(Runners-Up):

11th place CITY LIGHTS

& 12th THE SEARCHERS (NOTE: Was amazingly voted up #84 slots since '98's survey)

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  1.  The Wizard of Oz (1939)

  2.  It's a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad World (1963)

  3.  The Three Stooges Comedies (1934-1959)

  4.  It's a Wonderful Life (1946)

  5.  The Jolson Story (1946)

  6.  Bride of Frankenstein (1935)

  7.  The Tarzan Films (Weissmuller/Barker/Scott; 1932-1960)

  8.  Holiday Inn (1942)

  9.  The Warner Bros. Merrie Melodies/Looney Tunes Cartoons (1936-1963)

10.  Remember the Night (1940)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm terrible at this, limiting it to just 10. But, in such a case, I can easily say that the following films are pretty safe on the list.

Chinatown

Gone with the Wind

Modern Times

Singin' in the Rain

The Sound of Music

Sunset Boulevard

The Umbrellas of Cherbourg

That's seven. After that it gets hairy. Bonnie and Clyde. The Passion of Joan of Arc. ET. The Fisher King. Running on Empty. The Last Metro. To Kill a Mockingbird. Dodsworth. The Wizard of Oz. Beauty and the Beast (1991). The Dead. The Purple Rose of Cairo. Paris, Texas. Ali:Fear Eats the Soul. Wild Strawberries. Ordinary People. Citizen Kane. Bringing Up Baby. Shadow of a Doubt. The Godfather. A Man for All Seasons. Marty. Night of the Hunter. Back to the Future. Streetcar Named Desire. Quiz Show. All That Heaven Allows. The Thin Man. Random Harvest. Now Voyager. Rebecca.Stage Door. The General (1926).  That's naming only a few!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My favorite English-language movies at the moment:

The Thomas Crown Affair (1968)

Heathers (1988)

Killing Zoe (1993)

The Mystery of Mr. X (1934)

The Princess Bride (1987)

The Third Man (1949)

Rebecca (1940)

Rosencrantz & Guildenstern Are Dead (1990)

Death Takes a Holiday (1934)

Lock, Stock and Two Smoking Barrels (1998)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

For American flicks, I have sub-divided and segregated rankings like "Top Ten US", "Top 25 US", "Top 50 US", "Top 250 US".

I do the same for France, Asia, England, and the Russkies.

Then a list for "My Personal Favorites" vs a list of "Objective Picks for All-Time Best Movies Ever Made"

For a quick-and-dirty Top Ten, I might just rattle off at random...

 

The Bridge on the River Kwai

Mr. Smith Goes to Washington

Stalag 17

2001

The Wild Bunch

Gunga Din

Beau Geste

Meet John Doe

My Darling Clementine

Apocalypse Now

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

New Members:

Register Here

Learn more about the new message boards:

FAQ

Having problems?

Contact Us