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drednm

MARION DAVIES for STAR OF THE MONTH

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The Hollywood Revue of 1929 and Going Hollywood (with Bing Crosby).

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Not Star of the Month, but during the day on January 3rd, TCM is planning to celebrate Marion's birthday with 9 films:

The Patsy (1928)
Ever Since Eve (1937)
Hearts Divided (1936)
The Bachelor Father (1931)
Going Hollywood (1933)
Cain And Mabel (1936)
Not So Dumb (1930)
The Florodora Girl (1930)
Peg O' My Heart (1933)

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2 minutes ago, cmovieviewer said:

Not Star of the Month, but during the day on January 3rd, TCM is planning to celebrate Marion's birthday with 9 films:

The Patsy (1928)
Ever Since Eve (1937)
Hearts Divided (1936)
The Bachelor Father (1931)
Going Hollywood (1933)
Cain And Mabel (1936)
Not So Dumb (1930)
The Florodora Girl (1930)
Peg O' My Heart (1933)

Thanks for the reminder. And she had a Summer Under the Stars tribute in 2017.

So the programmers are definitely scheduling her films.

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Cain and Mabel (1936) was the third film Marion Davies made at Warners. Legend has it the film was a flop, but it spent 4 weeks in the top ten on Variety's box office charts for 20 major markets and earned over $1M at the box office. High production costs, mostly for the massive "Coney Island" and "I'll Sing You a Thousand Love Songs" numbers, cut down on profits. Davies (and Hearst) still had enough clout that they got MGM's Louis B. Mayer to loan out Clark Gable for the film, the second time Gable starred with Davies.

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21 minutes ago, drednm said:

Cain and Mabel (1936) was the third film Marion Davies made at Warners. Legend has it the film was a flop, but it spent 4 weeks in the top ten on Variety's box office charts for 20 major markets and earned over $1M at the box office. High production costs, mostly for the massive "Coney Island" and "I'll Sing You a Thousand Love Songs" numbers, cut down on profits. Davies (and Hearst) still had enough clout that they got MGM's Louis B. Mayer to loan out Clark Gable for the film, the second time Gable starred with Davies.

Yes, I think this particular loan out is quite significant. Mayer didn't like lending him to other companies. From 1931 to 1954 while Gable was under contract at MGM, he made 51 films for the studio. He was only loaned out a few times during these years-- for THE CALL OF THE WILD (1935); CAIN AND MABEL (1936); and GONE WITH THE WIND (1939).

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I mean ... TopBilled, I know you're the most prolific poster of all time, and I don't want to sound like I'm trying to play gotcha or anything, but ... It Happened One Night?

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4 minutes ago, sewhite2000 said:

I mean ... TopBilled, I know you're the most prolific poster of all time, and I don't want to sound like I'm trying to play gotcha or anything, but ... It Happened One Night?

Oh my...you're right...how'd I miss that one! Thanks for the correction.

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Can you answer my question if Jan. 2019 schedule has been posted that I made on another thread? Struggling to find it. I assume the 31 Days of Oscar schedule still isn't up yet.

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1 minute ago, TopBilled said:

Oh my...you're right...how'd I miss that one! Thanks for the correction.

Other studios tried to snag Gable but Mayer resisted most of the offers since Gable was a top male box office star for most of the 30s. If I remember right, the loan to Columbia for It Happened One Night was a punishment. Oddly, they tried to get Davies for this film as well but even if Mayer ever considered the loan, Hearst would have refused it. MGM rarely loaned out its top stars.

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I was just thinking I've forgotten the punishment, but that's the legendary story, anyway. I don't know if there was one or more films Gable refused to do, like Bette Davis at Warner Bros., or if he was late on set, or what, but the urban legend is Mayer lent Gable out to Poverty Row to teach him some kind of lesson. And the lesson was ... he won an Oscar!

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10 minutes ago, drednm said:

Other studios tried to snag Gable but Mayer resisted most of the offers since Gable was a top male box office star for most of the 30s. If I remember right, the loan to Columbia for It Happened One Night was a punishment. Oddly, they tried to get Davies for this film as well but even if Mayer ever considered the loan, Hearst would have refused it. MGM rarely loaned out its top stars.

Not with Gable or Davies, but sometimes they loaned stars out so they could fulfill a contract they didn't plan to renew. When Lucille Bremer flopped in YOLANDA AND THE THIEF (1945), the studio decided to dump her. But they owed her three more films at her guaranteed salary. So they sent her to Eagle-Lion where she did three films and finished out her contract. Poor gal never got to go back to MGM.

Warners also did a similar thing with Joan Leslie around the same time. She had been complaining about the quality of the scripts she'd been given. So they decided to drop her. She wouldn't go on suspension so they sent her to Eagle-Lion to do the last two pictures remaining on her contract.

Being sent to a "lesser" studio was sometimes like being sent to Siberia if you weren't working out at the home studio. It was a way for them to get rid of you.

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7 hours ago, TopBilled said:

Not with Gable or Davies, but sometimes they loaned stars out so they could fulfill a contract they didn't plan to renew. When Lucille Bremer flopped in YOLANDA AND THE THIEF (1945), the studio decided to dump her. But they owed her three more films at her guaranteed salary. So they sent her to Eagle-Lion where she did three films and finished out her contract. Poor gal never got to go back to MGM.

Warners also did a similar thing with Joan Leslie around the same time. She had been complaining about the quality of the scripts she'd been given. So they decided to drop her. She wouldn't go on suspension so they sent her to Eagle-Lion to do the last two pictures remaining on her contract.

Being sent to a "lesser" studio was sometimes like being sent to Siberia if you weren't working out at the home studio. It was a way for them to get rid of you.

Oh yes and MGM loaned out Rosalind Russell for Craig's Wife. It did happen, but not often.

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1 hour ago, drednm said:

Oh yes and MGM loaned out Rosalind Russell for Craig's Wife. It did happen, but not often.

Yes, Roz was loaned to Columbia for that picture. Also MGM had loaned Roz out to 20th Century Fox for IT HAD TO HAPPEN (1936) where she played a lead opposite George Raft; and for Fox's remake of UNDER TWO FLAGS (1936) in which she had a supporting role under Claudette Colbert & Ronald Colman.

Plus the studio loaned Wallace Beery out to Fox for SLAVE SHIP (1937) where he was second-billed after Warner Baxter.

If there was a good financial incentive, in this case Zanuck's company paying the stars' hefty salaries, then Mayer considered loaning them out. But as you said, he didn't do it often.

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Here's MARION DAVIES in a diva moment from THE RESTLESS SEX (1920) with Ralph Kellard. This was one of my first Kickstarter projects. Also co-stars Carlyle Blackwell in his final American film. Music is mine.

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Without the WRH connection, it has been said Davies would be a minor footnote to film history.

If Carmel Myers had a dalliance with WR her career would be totally in revision now also probably.

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1 hour ago, GordonCole said:

Without the WRH connection, it has been said Davies would be a minor footnote to film history.

Who said that? People who want to discredit Marion Davies' talent?

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16 hours ago, sewhite2000 said:

Can you answer my question if Jan. 2019 schedule has been posted that I made on another thread? Struggling to find it. I assume the 31 Days of Oscar schedule still isn't up yet.

I just looked. Still not up.

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2 hours ago, GordonCole said:

Without the WRH connection, it has been said Davies would be a minor footnote to film history.

If Carmel Myers had a dalliance with WR her career would be totally in revision now also probably.

Absolutely not true.

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9 minutes ago, GordonCole said:

What is true is that it is a matter of opinion.

Without WR I doubt we'd be talking about Davies at all.

Do you apply this logic to Norma Shearer, too? And say that without Irving Thalberg, we wouldn't be talking about her either?

I think these women were very talented and very resourceful. And they would have been movie stars no matter what. It was their destiny.

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