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drednm

MARION DAVIES for STAR OF THE MONTH

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The 2-strip color sequence survives intact in the film. I've tinkered with the color a little since it has faded....

 

 

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25 minutes ago, TopBilled said:

But certain things did refer to Davies, and it outraged Hearst. Probably screenwriter Herman Mankiewicz knew things about their relationship that Welles did not. I think Welles was more interested in exposing the corruption of power, generally speaking...but Mankiewicz was interested in attacking Hearst.

Davies was caught in the crossfire.

I think you are exactly correct.... Davies was one of the most popular figures in Hollywood in her day.

Davies always downplayed her talent and her ambitions, but she maintained a starring career in films for 20 years. The departure from Warners in 1937 wasn't meant to be a permanent retirement. Hearst shopped Cosmopolitan and Davies at a few other big studios but nothing came of it. She "tended" Hearst for the next 14 years.

Maybe her starring days were just about over in 1937. She was 40 years old. Warners had bought Tovarich for her. I think she might have gone on for another few years. The war culture and the fast changes in style and taste probably would have undone her anyway, especially since Hearst had such a narrow image of her as a screen personality.

G.B. Shaw wanted her to play Eliza in Pygmalion, which would have reunited her with Leslie Howard. You have to remember the role was originally written for an "older" actress. Mrs. Patrick Harris originated the role in 1914 when she was in her late 40s.

Bottom line for Davies is that she accepted. She didn't whine and complain about the roles she didn't get. She didn't complain about her "forced" retirement from the screen or the years she tended Hearst in his old age. She remained part of the Hollywood social scene and maintained her friendships. She never really went away, but she was pretty much out of the public eye. Squibs still appeared in the columns up until her death.

She claimed never to have seen Citizen Kane (she says that in her memoir), but the reactions to her "portrayal" by Hedda Hopper, Louella Parsons, her family, and others certainly were known to her. She brushed it aside by stating that Hearst had taught her to NEVER read criticism about her. You have to wonder tough.

 

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2 hours ago, drednm said:

The 2-strip color sequence survives intact in the film. I've tinkered with the color a little since it has faded....

 

 

Lovely sequence. Thanks for sharing!

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MARION DAVIES in Blondie of the Follies (1932) playing a tenement girl who becomes a Follies star, co-stars Billie Dove, Robert Montgomery, and Jimmy Durante.

BLONDIE-FOLLIES.jpg

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27 minutes ago, drednm said:

MARION DAVIES in Blondie of the Follies (1932) playing a tenement girl who becomes a Follies star, co-stars Billie Dove, Robert Montgomery, and Jimmy Durante.

BLONDIE-FOLLIES.jpg

Did she and Billie Dove get along? I've read conflicting things about that. I know Dove quit motion pictures after BLONDIE OF THE FOLLIES was completed. (Though Dove would do a cameo in another film 30 years later.)

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18 minutes ago, TopBilled said:

Did she and Billie Dove get along? I've read conflicting things about that. I know Dove quit motion pictures after BLONDIE OF THE FOLLIES was completed. (Though Dove would do a cameo in another film 30 years later.)

Dove's role was apparently trimmed, supposedly to favor Davies, but since Davies was the star, that doesn't seem unreasonable. Davies got along with everyone, but Dove might have considered it the last straw. He talkie career hadn't exactly been a house afire. She had already left (or had been dropped) by First National and had been working for a poverty row studio. How she came to get this role at MGM, I have no idea. That being said, Davies and Dove are excellent together and quite believable in their relationship as friends (with an edge). The advertising certainly downplayed Dove's role.

MV5-BZDg3-MDc2-Mz-It-Yz-Vl-Yy00-ZWMz-LWF

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2 hours ago, drednm said:

Dove's role was apparently trimmed, supposedly to favor Davies, but since Davies was the star, that doesn't seem unreasonable. Davies got along with everyone, but Dove might have considered it the last straw. He talkie career hadn't exactly been a house afire. She had already left (or had been dropped) by First National and had been working for a poverty row studio. How she came to get this role at MGM, I have no idea. That being said, Davies and Dove are excellent together and quite believable in their relationship as friends (with an edge). The advertising certainly downplayed Dove's role.

MV5-BZDg3-MDc2-Mz-It-Yz-Vl-Yy00-ZWMz-LWF

Goulding was an excellent director. Dove seems to get sidelined in this picture. Durante is great at supplying the comic relief.

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Something I posted at another thread that I feel is relevant to this one:

Note that the L.A. Times had a great article on Monday,  about 'The Forgotten early Film stars' that was focused only on the women related to a DVD box set of film featuring female directors.    Females directors were a powerful force in Hollywood during the silent era.   E.g. Lois Weber was one of the top directors at Universal Studios, and in all of Hollywood, in the early decades of the 20th century.  Studio chief Carl Laemmle described her as his 'best man on the lot'.    Weber had peers like Cleo Madison, Ida May Park, Ruth Ann Baldwin,  Elsie Jane Wilson, and Lule Warrenton.   Some 170 films were helmed by women at the studio from 1914 - 1919.

The articles doesn't go into much detail about what changed but to say WWI had an impact and studios changed practices and mostly hired men (some only men) to be producers and directors.    

Sorry for not providing a link,  but I highly recommend this.

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Just a heads up--

The two films Marion Davies made with Dick Powell are airing on TCM tomorrow as part of Powell's Star of the Month tribute:

PAGE MISS GLORY (1935) which Maltin gives 2.5 stars

and

HEARTS DIVIDED (1936) which Maltin awards 2 stars.

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Here's MARION DAVIES inscribing her cement slab at Grauman's Chinese Theatre on May 13, 1929. She was the 13th star to do so.

7b9377a6655286a0019447236908b80e.jpg

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