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Teacher who spoiled Santa will not return to school

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Teacher who spoiled Santa will not return to school

MONTVILLE, N.J. (AP) — School officials say a substitute teacher who told first-grade students in New Jersey that Santa Claus isn't real will not be returning to the school.

NJ.com reports Montville Schools Superintendent Rene Rovtar confirmed Tuesday the teacher will no longer work in the district after the incident Thursday at Cedar Hill School.

Rovtar declined further comment, saying the issue is a personnel matter.

Officials say the teacher debunked other holiday characters, including the Easter Bunny, the Tooth Fairy and Elf on a Shelf.

Rovtar previously said she was disheartened by the incident and that "childhood wonder associated with all holidays and traditions" is special to her.

The substitute teacher's identity has not been released.

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How did they ever let the Grinch be a substitute teacher?

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23 minutes ago, MovieMadness said:

The substitute teacher's identity has not been released.

For her safety.

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I just sent an email to that superintendent. Her email can easily be found on the Montville Township Public Schools website.

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7 hours ago, MovieMadness said:

Teacher who spoiled Santa will not return to school

MONTVILLE, N.J. (AP) — School officials say a substitute teacher who told first-grade students in New Jersey that Santa Claus isn't real will not be returning to the school.

NJ.com reports Montville Schools Superintendent Rene Rovtar confirmed Tuesday the teacher will no longer work in the district after the incident Thursday at Cedar Hill School.

Rovtar declined further comment, saying the issue is a personnel matter.

Officials say the teacher debunked other holiday characters, including the Easter Bunny, the Tooth Fairy and Elf on a Shelf.

Rovtar previously said she was disheartened by the incident and that "childhood wonder associated with all holidays and traditions" is special to her.

The substitute teacher's identity has not been released.

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How did they ever let the Grinch be a substitute teacher?

 

Poor kids, they only have ONE childhood. :(

Even the Grinch wasn't THAT mean. :angry:

the_grinch_cindy_nbc_2015.jpeg

 

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Is that really worth firing someone over? Talk about being thin skinned. Also the issue would be a "personal matter." 

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4 hours ago, Gershwin fan said:

Is that really worth firing someone over? Talk about being thin skinned. Also the issue would be a "personal matter." 

Thin-skinned? Do you have a clue here?

What teachers are telling the kids is very important - to the parents, to the school board, and to the kids.

What kind of rtard teacher doesn't know that ruining everyone's - not only the children's - Christmas fun is something that won't have to be paid for?

"Thin-skinned". Jeezuz. 

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To the Montville School - a suggestion.  Read and give this to the first graders, might repair the damage..

 

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In September 1897, Francis Pharcellus Church, a former Civil War correspondent and editor at the New York Sun, received a letter from the then 8-year-old Virginia O’Hanlon.

In her letter, young Virginia wrote:

Dear Editor, 
I am 8 years old. Some of my little friends say there is no Santa Claus. Papa says, "If you see it in the Sun, it's so." Please tell me the truth, is there a Santa Claus? 
Virginia O'Hanlon
115 West Ninety-Fifth Street

Virginia, your little friends are wrong. They have been affected by the skepticism of a skeptical age. They do not believe except [what] they see. They think that nothing can be which is not comprehensible by their little minds. All minds, Virginia, whether they be men's or children's, are little. In this great universe of ours man is a mere insect, an ant, in his intellect, as compared with the boundless world about him, as measured by the intelligence capable of grasping the whole of truth and knowledge.

Yes, Virginia, there is a Santa Claus. He exists as certainly as love and generosity and devotion exist, and you know that they abound and give to your life its highest beauty and joy. Alas! how dreary would be the world if there were no Santa Claus. It would be as dreary as if there were no Virginias. There would be no childlike faith then, no poetry, no romance to make tolerable this existence. We should have no enjoyment, except in sense and sight. The eternal light with which childhood fills the world would be extinguished.

Not believe in Santa Claus! You might as well not believe in fairies! You might get your papa to hire men to watch in all the chimneys on Christmas Eve to catch Santa Claus, but even if they did not see Santa Claus coming down, what would that prove? Nobody sees Santa Claus, but that is no sign that there is no Santa Claus. The most real things in the world are those that neither children nor men can see. Did you ever see fairies dancing on the lawn? Of course not, but that's no proof that they are not there. Nobody can conceive or imagine all the wonders there are unseen and unseeable in the world.

You may tear apart the baby's rattle and see what makes the noise inside, but there is a veil covering the unseen world which not the strongest man, nor even the united strength of all the strongest men that ever lived, could tear apart. Only faith, fancy, poetry, love, romance, can push aside that curtain and view and picture the supernal beauty and glory beyond. Is it all real? Ah, Virginia, in all this world there is nothing else real and abiding.

No Santa Claus! Thank God! he lives, and he lives forever. A thousand years from now, Virginia, nay, ten times ten thousand years from now, he will continue to make glad the heart of childhood.

The original article

8a3a7667620d2259bf725d3ff3c7aeda.jpg

 

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7 hours ago, Gershwin fan said:

Is that really worth firing someone over? Talk about being thin skinned. Also the issue would be a "personal matter." 

it isn't the place of teachers to encroach on the territory of parents. suppose a conservative teacher told students that evolution and climate change are unproven scientific theories.

:D

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7 hours ago, Gershwin fan said:

Is that really worth firing someone over? Talk about being thin skinned. Also the issue would be a "personal matter." 

You should have seen the email I sent to the superintendent. 

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4 minutes ago, TopBilled said:

You should have seen the email I sent to the superintendent. 

Was it very strongly worded? 

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13 minutes ago, NipkowDisc said:

it isn't the place of teachers to encroach on the territory of parents. suppose a conservative teacher told students that evolution and climate change are unproven scientific theories.

:D

Actually all curriculum can be seen as encroaching on the territory of the parents. They're not the primary educators during those hours, and if they agree to send their children to that school, they are agreeing that the curriculum is acceptable to them.

The real problem with this situation is that the substitute teachers were obviously not properly trained. Some public districts put subs through rigorous two-day or three-day trainings, with followups that are ongoing monthly or bimonthly. Typically this is done since a lot of subs are working in multiple districts, so they are told up front this is what we do here, this is how our district runs, etc. The initial trainings/orientations have to be done, without pay, before they can even step into the classrooms. Usually the primary focus of these trainings is following a prescribed curriculum.

It's a safe bet that the sub at this particular school was not teaching to the curriculum-- was doing something educators called "birdwalking," where they allow the kids to get them off the lesson, asking them personal questions. I am sure they, kids being kids, started talking about Christmas and asking about Santa. I wouldn't be surprised if some kids had already suspected there was no Santa and asked the sub, "is it true there's not really a Santa?"

A properly trained sub would have said, "sorry kids, but we have a lesson to do, let's get back to our math or reading or whatever subject is being taught, and you can take that up with your parents when you get home this afternoon." If the kids still persist in this, then they would be told "do you want to talk to the principal and ask the principal about Santa?" That gets the onus off the sub and puts it on the administrator.

But since this sub ended up birdwalking and straying from the curriculum, this whole can of worms was opened. 

So the district has to take responsibility for putting subs in school rooms where they are not being followed up to see if they are sticking to the prescribe curricula.

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8 minutes ago, TopBilled said:

Actually all curriculum can be seen as encroaching on the territory of the parents. They're not the primary educators during those hours, and if they agree to send their children to that school, they are agreeing that the curriculum is acceptable to them.

The real problem with this situation is that the substitute teachers were obviously not properly trained. Some public districts put subs through rigorous two-day or three-trainings, with followups that are ongoing. The initial trainings/orientations have to be done, without pay, before they can even step into the classrooms. Usually the primary focus of these trainings is following a prescribed curriculum.

It's a safe bet that the sub at this particular school was not teaching to the curriculum-- was doing something educators called "birdwalking," where they allow the kids to get them off the lesson, asking them personal questions. I am sure they, kids being kids, started talking about Christmas and asking about Santa. I wouldn't be surprised if some kids had already suspected there was no Santa and asked the sub, "is it true there's not really a Santa?" A properly trained sub would have said, "sorry kids, but we have a lesson to do, let's get back to our math or reading or whatever subject was being taught, and you can take that up with your parents when you get home this afternoon." 

But since this sub ended up birdwalking and straying from the curriculum, this whole can of worms was opened. 

So the district has to take responsibility for putting subs in school rooms where they are not being followed up to see if they are sticking to the prescribe curricula.

 

She should at least have something called common sense, they are 6-7 year old children.  

The sub must had a miserable childhood with snobs for parents that didn't believe in this. (yeah they exist) :(

3c37e604-6e93-4926-8fd0-94b1f49a6499-Get

 

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14 minutes ago, Gershwin fan said:

Was it very strongly worded? 

It was short and to the point, about a paragraph in length. Of course I got an out-of-office reply saying she was out for the week, but that reply had her secretary's phone number which I might call next week. I do not expect a written reply from the superintendent, because I expect her to be cowardly and not say anything that could cost her to lose her job. It's already a P.R. nightmare for them.

But I do think my succinct paragraph gave her food for thought. I am sure it did, it was very blistering we might say. LOL

I put my location underneath the paragraph because I wanted her to see that because of their mismanagement, this whole thing has gone national. 

I had to be careful not to make it sound like a rant. I used educational jargon, because you have to talk in their language. These people tend not to be very connected to reality. There's a reason public schools are in such dire straits, most of these so-called district leaders couldn't even manage classrooms when they were teachers in their early days. They went into administration because it was an escape, not because they knew how to run anything properly.

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6 minutes ago, NipkowDisc said:

doan show miracle on 34th street in her classroom.

:lol:

or the Mexican Santa movie (though that one is too unintentionally creepy to show kids anyway :lol: )

santa-the-pedophile.jpg

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13 minutes ago, NipkowDisc said:

doan show miracle on 34th street in her classroom.

:lol:

Or maybe "Prancer" (1989) love the minister's sermon about the local newspaper article on the subject.  At the end Jessica's father got the message.

 

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I wonder if I should share a story about an experience I had where I taught against the commercialism of Christmas. I got away with it, because I knew how to work the curricular standards to my advantage. It was one of the most liberating lessons I ever taught. The administrator came into the room and I knew she was unhappy but she had stupidly signed off on my lesson plan at the end of the previous week and there was nothing she could do to stop it. And those kids were young. But that was one of the most well-thought out lessons I ever did, and I know it made a huge difference in their lives.

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4 minutes ago, TopBilled said:

I wonder if I should share a story about an experience I had where I taught against the commercialism of Christmas. I got away with it, because I knew how to work the curricular standards to my advantage. It was one of the most liberating lessons I ever taught. The administrator came into the room and I knew she was unhappy but she had stupidly signed off on my lesson plan at the end of the previous week and there was nothing she could do to stop it. And those kids were young. But that was one of the most well-thought out lessons I ever did, and I know it made a huge difference in their lives.

Yes, please share. I didn't even know you worked as a teacher before. 

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Was one lesson not to make out a wish list that takes an entire box of computer paper? :P

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The class I worked with was a fifth/sixth grade combo. They were all 10/11 years old. It was a good group, the kids were smart and kind. I know the parents approved of my teaching and I was named Teacher of the Year at that site at the end of the academic year.

But I could tell in late November and early December that Christmas was bringing out the worst in them, not the best. They were having little rivalries on the playground and in the halls, about who would get the biggest most expensive presents. One girl was from a recently immigrated family and they were dirt poor. I knew she was intimidated by the other ones, and sensitive, because she would be lucky to get one nice present she'd probably have to share with her sister.

So it became increasingly clear to me that greed was overtaking this group, aggravated by the commercialism of Christmas marketing. So for our language arts class, I gave them a story I had written (a copy I had provided the principal who was probably too lazy to read it or even glance over it). But what I did was I summarized an episode of the classic TV series 'The Twilight Zone.' It's one where a bunch of presents wind up in a trash incinerator at the end. It was Rod Serling's way of telling the audience that material things end up going on the trash heap in the end, and it's the spiritual or good-hearted exchanges we have during the holiday season that matter the most.

So I created this text based on that episode, and I wove all our language arts standards for that week into it. It was very academic. We went over the text several times discussing plot points, characterization, themes, etc. This was a legitimate lesson that utilized the reading comprehension standards. Then the next day after we'd gone over the text, I showed that episode of TZ. The principal came in just as we got to the scene where the gifts wind up in the trash. I knew she didn't like it at all. But she was powerless to stop me.

We then did compare-contrast diagrams of how the text we read the day before matched up with what they saw on screen. Like the whole thing was well-planned. And I knew after that two-day lesson, those kids thought about how a lot of their material gifts wouldn't last and wouldn't even mean anything a month after Christmas, but the other gifts they might receive from their families year round (like clothing, food, a good home and love) would be the things they could hold on to and cherish. So I used TZ to teach a very corny lesson, but I also was able to teach against the commercialism of Christmas which I just really enjoyed doing!

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12 minutes ago, TopBilled said:

But what I did was I summarized an episode of the classic TV series 'The Twilight Zone.' It's one where a bunch of presents wind up in a trash incinerator at the end. It was Rod Serling's way of telling the audience that material things end up going on the trash heap in the end, and it's the spiritual or good-hearted exchanges we have during the holiday season that matter the most.

Which episode was that?

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2 minutes ago, LawrenceA said:

Which episode was that?

I think he's referring to Five Characters in Search of an Exit. 

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1 minute ago, Gershwin fan said:

I think he's referring to Five Characters in Search of an Exit. 

That episode didn't have an incinerator, as far as I recall. The dolls were in a collection bin for a charity giveaway, not the garbage.

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