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cinecrazydc

Reclusive Ida Lupino

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Hey! Good stuff. Thanks for posting this.

Whenever I think of Lupino I think first of her role with Ray Milland in 'The Light that Failed'. Really shows off her beauty. Then I think of 'High Sierra' and finally her role in 'Junior Bonner'. I like that 'tough old chain-smoking broad' type of role. Louise Latham types.

Who today among the FoxNews audience would know Lupino's name, I'd probably be pretty surprised to hear just how many no matter what the number is. :o

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40 minutes ago, Sgt_Markoff said:

Hey! Good stuff. Thanks for posting this.

Whenever I think of Lupino I think first of her role with Ray Milland in 'The Light that Failed'. Really shows off her beauty. Then I think of 'High Sierra' and finally her role in 'Junior Bonner'. I like that 'tough old chain-smoking broad' type of role. Louise Latham types.

Who today among the FoxNews audience would know Lupino's name, I'd probably be pretty surprised to hear just how many no matter what the number is. :o

I also enjoy Lupino in those films,  but The Light that Failed starred Ronald Colman. 

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In 1959, Ida Lupino and Howard Duff guest-starred on The Lucy-Desi Comedy Hour. They played two couples mistakenly booked for the same woodsy cabin and trying to cohabit the cabin while having romantic getaways. Lupino showed a deft comic touch.

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2 hours ago, drednm said:

In 1959, Ida Lupino and Howard Duff guest-starred on The Lucy-Desi Comedy Hour. They played two couples mistakenly booked for the same woodsy cabin and trying to cohabit the cabin while having romantic getaways. Lupino showed a deft comic touch.

Yea,  I've seen that one and it funny.   Lupino did display a deft comic touch in that episode.  

I'm sure you know this, but since I don't see it mentioned above,  Lupino and Duff were married from 1951 until 1983.    (a lot longer than her other two marriages to Louis Hayward, producer Collier Young).

Note that Carla Bley wrote a song Ida Lupino and it can be found on a record by jazz guitarist John Scofield.

Don't know why John put this song on his album or why Bley named it after Ida.   

But I do remember being surprised when I purchased the album and saw her name as one of the songs! 

 

 

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2 hours ago, drednm said:

In 1959, Ida Lupino and Howard Duff guest-starred on The Lucy-Desi Comedy Hour. They played two couples mistakenly booked for the same woodsy cabin and trying to cohabit the cabin while having romantic getaways. Lupino showed a deft comic touch.

Dre-- I watched " The Lucy Desi Comedy Hour " first run. Now I have the DVDs.

It was uncanny how Lucy and Desi picked other Showbiz couples to appear with them in their hour-long series:

Betty Grable and Harry James

Fred MacMurray and June Haver

Ernie Kovacs and Edie Adams

And Ida Lupino and Howard Duff.

 

At this time Ida and Howard had appeared in a comedy TV series called "Mr Adams & Eve."

It wasn't as popular of course as  " I Love Lucy " but, indeed, you're right,  Ida had a deft ability in comedy.

Watching that episode today, it made me realize how good Ida had to be because she was working one-on-one with Lucille Ball--

Taking on the Ethel Mertz role, just the way that Vivian Vance always did.

The character that Ida was playing in this episode was similar to the Pampered movie star that she played in her own TV comedy series.

 

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40 minutes ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

Yea,  I've seen that one and it funny.   Lupino did display a deft comic touch in that episode.  

I'm sure you know this, but since I don't see it mentioned above, 

 

*Lupino and Duff were married from 1951 until 1983.    (a lot longer than her other two marriages to Louis Hayward, producer Collier Young).*

 

Note that Carla Bley wrote a song Ida Lupino and it can be found on a record by jazz guitarist John Scofield.

Don't know why John put this song on his album or why Bley named it after Ida.   

But I do remember being surprised when I purchased the album and saw her name as one of the songs! 

 

 

*Possibly the reason this marriage was longer was because the two of them had a daughter named Bridget in 1952.

Watching Ida on " This Is Your Life"  on YouTube, I was totally surprised to find out that she had been a polio victim as a teenage actress in Hollywood. She later used that experience in her life for one of the movies She directed:  "Never Fear". It is about how polio destroys the dance career a young woman.

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1 hour ago, Princess of Tap said:

*Possibly the reason this marriage was longer was because the two of them had a daughter named Bridget in 1952.

Yes, I think that was part of the reason Lupino & Duff stayed married. But from what I understand they did not live together the last few years of the marriage. They had previously broken up and reconciled and this time they delayed finalizing the divorce. Maybe there was a financial reason.

Julie Adams and Ray Danton had a similarly troubled yet lengthy marriage that also ended in divorce, after their sons were grown. In fact Adams continued to work on television with Danton after their divorce, where he directed her on shows like Quincy and Cagney & Lacey. I always suspected that was part of the terms of their divorce, that he had to help her get cast on projects he worked on or else pay alimony.

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29 minutes ago, TopBilled said:

Yes, I think that was part of the reason Lupino & Duff stayed married. But from what I understand they did not live together the last few years of the marriage. They had previously broken up and reconciled and this time they delayed finalizing the divorce. Maybe there was a financial reason.

Julie Adams and Ray Danton had a similarly troubled yet lengthy marriage that also ended in divorce, after their sons were grown. In fact Adams continued to work on television with Danton after their divorce, where he directed her on shows like Quincy and Cagney & Lacey. I always suspected that was part of the terms of their divorce, that he had to help her get cast on projects he worked on or else pay alimony.

By all accounts, Howard Duff was the love of Ida Lupino's life.

 I read an interview with Bridget Duff where she states that her father had told her that he was not husband material and that her mother knew that when they got married.

What I always found so amazing was Collier Young, Ida's second husband, Ida Lupino and Howard Duff  all continued working together on movie projects after all that had happened to the three of them.

One such project I recently saw was "Private Hell 36":

Directed by Don Siegel

Screenplay by Collier Young and Ida

And starring Ida, Steve Cochran and Howard Duff

BTW-- Bridget plays Howard's baby in the movie.

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On 1/13/2019 at 5:24 PM, Princess of Tap said:

By all accounts, Howard Duff was the love of Ida Lupino's life.

 

That may well be true but Lupino once said that the greatest regret of her life was turning down a marriage proposal by Errol Flynn. They had nicknames for each other. He was "Baron" and she was "Little Scout" or "Idsie."

They did silly things together, like the time they had a Viking funeral for a sparrow who had crashed into a window.

She may have even saved his life one night when he phoned her to say he needed her, adding he didn't know if he was going to make it through the night. She arrived at his Mulholland Drive home to find him with booze and drugs in him, combined with a recurring bout of malaria. He was on his knees and a temperature of 103F. She called a doctor and he slowly came out of it after getting a shot of something from the medic.

Around this same time Flynn was having problems with an Austrian who had challenged him to a duel over a woman. Errol again called Lupino for help in the middle of the night, telling her to bring the longest kitchen knife she could find, to do Act Two and act mad. When Lupino arrived at Flynn's home his front door was open and she found him confronted by a man with a saber.

Ida yelled "What's this Austrian doing here?" and charged at him with the knife. The Austrian, shocked by her arrival and behaviour, took off from Flynn's home as fast as possible. Errol Flynn may not have scared him but a knife wielding Ida Lupino sure did.

Lupino later said that Flynn brought rays of sunshine into her life but she had a feeling that if they had married it wouldn't have lasted.

Flynn would make almost no reference to Lupino in his autobiography, an act friends said was his way of showing respect for the privacy of their friendship. Ida's mother had a nickname, too, "Duchess" and she and Errol got along well. So well, in fact, that when the mother died a month after Flynn's funeral she was buried beside the actor.

Eventually Ida would be buried with her mother. Whether the location of Flynn's grave beside her Mom played a role I can't say but I suspect that it may have.

10cb85f56c8c5160a5238f4a2855031c.jpg

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50 minutes ago, TomJH said:

That may well be true but Lupino once said that the greatest regret of her life was turning down a marriage proposal by Errol Flynn. They had nicknames for each other. He was "Baron" and she was "Little Scout" or "Idsie."

They did silly things together, like the time they had a Viking funeral for a sparrow who had crashed into a window.

She may have even saved his life one night when he phoned her to say he needed her, adding he didn't know if he was going to make it through the night. She arrived at his Mulholland Drive home to find him with booze and drugs in him, combined with a recurring bout of malaria. He was on his knees and a temperature of 103F. She called a doctor and he slowly came out of it after getting a shot of something from the medic.

Around this same time Flynn was having problems with an Austrian who had challenged him to a duel over a woman. Errol again called Lupino for help in the middle of the night, telling her to bring the longest kitchen knife she could find, to do Act Two and act mad. When Lupino arrived at Flynn's home his front door was open and she found him confronted by a man with a saber.

Ida yelled "What's this Austrian doing here?" and charged at him with the knife. The Austrian, shocked by her arrival and behaviour, took off from Flynn's home as fast as possible. Errol Flynn didn't scare him but a knife wielding Ida Lupino sure did.

Lupino later said that Flynn brought rays of sunshine into her life but she had a feeling that if they had married it wouldn't have lasted.

Flynn would make almost no reference to Lupino in his autobiography, an act friends said was his way of showing respect for the privacy of their friendship. Ida's mother had a nickname, too, "Duchess" and she and Errol got along well. So well, in fact, that when the mother died a month after Flynn's funeral she was buried beside the actor.

Eventually Ida would be buried with her mother. Whether the location of Flynn's grave beside her Mom played a role I can't say but I suspect that it may have.

10cb85f56c8c5160a5238f4a2855031c.jpg

This may sound unbelievable, when you Consider the character of Howard Duff, but  Ida made a better choice with him than Errol Flynn. LOL

Which brings us to Patrice Wymore, who made Errol Flynn the love of her life.

Patrice, who was one beautiful and very talented tap dancer from Kansas, more or less was accepting of Errol Flynn the way he was and stayed married to him till death do us part.

The only thing I believe she ever regretted about marrying Flynn was their daughter taking up his Wicked Ways and trying to outdo her father. The story of their daughter would make a fantastic movie*.

 

*( Does that make you think of the movie "Too Much Too Soon"?)

 

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36 minutes ago, Princess of Tap said:

This may sound unbelievable, when you Consider the character of Howard Duff, but  Ida made a better choice with him than Errol Flynn. LOL

Which brings us to Patrice Wymore, who made Errol Flynn the love of her life.

Patrice, who was one beautiful and very talented tap dancer from Kansas, more or less was accepting of Errol Flynn the way he was and stayed married to him till death do us part.

The only thing I believe she ever regretted about marrying Flynn was their daughter taking up his Wicked Ways and trying to outdo her father. The story of their daughter would make a fantastic movie*.

 

*( Does that make you think of the movie "Too Much Too Soon"?)

 

Arnella Flynn was a tragic figure and there are overtones in her story to that of Diana Barrymore, just as there are parallels between Flynn and the Great Profile.

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On 1/9/2019 at 7:06 PM, jamesjazzguitar said:

I also enjoy Lupino in those films,  but The Light that Failed starred Ronald Colman. 

The Light that Failed is one of my favorite films. Ida Lupino is excellent, but I think the greatness of the film lies elsewhere, as one of the most romantic Hollywood films ever made. I particularly like Colman, Dudley Digges, Walter Huston, and Muriel Angelus. Great score by Victor Young; and one of the most evocative, beautiful beginnings ever: those kids and the goat on the beach at Fort Keeling in 1865. A quiet, sad, wonderful movie.

 

 

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23 hours ago, Princess of Tap said:

This may sound unbelievable, when you Consider the character of Howard Duff, but  Ida made a better choice with him than Errol Flynn. 

Full agreement with you on this. There was a lot of dimension in the relationship she had with Duff. Also, I think she needed someone who was American. Sort of like Jean Simmons marrying Richard Brooks. These actresses had left their native Britain, came to Hollywood, and stayed, then became American citizens. It made sense for them to wind up with American husbands.

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We frequently see threads composed around the idea of 'favorite directors'. Has anyone ever done a thread on 'favorite producers'? Who are the most admirable Hollywood producers of all time, and why? Dory Schary, etc?

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7 hours ago, Sgt_Markoff said:

We frequently see threads composed around the idea of 'favorite directors'. Has anyone ever done a thread on 'favorite producers'? Who are the most admirable Hollywood producers of all time, and why? Dory Schary, etc?

Good idea,  so start one.    Off the top of my head I would say Hal B. Wallis.    In both his Warner years and post-Warner years,  there are some great films.  

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Always amazed by a poster who tells another poster to start a certain thread (even provides the subject matter) but he never does so himself.

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That's how I roll! I'm an ideas man. Let someone else do the grunt-work. Besides, if the thread winds up just being an 'accidental repeat' of one buried in the sands of time, let them get the blame.  ;)

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2 minutes ago, Sgt_Markoff said:

That's how I roll! I'm an ideas man. Let someone else do the grunt-work. Besides, if the thread winds up just being an 'accidental repeat' of one buried in the sands of time, let them get the blame.  ;)

Right on brother.    You have my support!  (but not my effort since I'm not going to create a thread either - wink).

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Ha ha. Yeah maybe if I hadn't been so strongly discouraged from digging up old threads from the archives, I'd be more enthusiastic about making new ones. It makes no sense to me to repeat something which has already been done.

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2 hours ago, Sgt_Markoff said:

Ha ha. Yeah maybe if I hadn't been so strongly discouraged from digging up old threads from the archives, I'd be more enthusiastic about making new ones. It makes no sense to me to repeat something which has already been done.

If the search feature worked better I would recommend one of us use it to search to see if there is an 'old' thread related to top-producers.      I'm posting this since we are getting off topic and that also bugs some people at this forum.

PS:  My wife once called Ida plain looking.    I don't recall which film that was but it was one where she had a low-key look.    She said something to me like 'you find her sexy?'.

Well I answered by showing her this photo!  

 

Image result for ida lupino

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1 hour ago, Sgt_Markoff said:

That's how I roll! I'm an ideas man. Let someone else do the grunt-work. Besides, if the thread winds up just being an 'accidental repeat' of one buried in the sands of time, let them get the blame.  ;)

Actually, I wasn't referring to you, Sarge.

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