misswonderly3

NOW I'M REALLY MAD ! ! !

157 posts in this topic

15 minutes ago, Sgt_Markoff said:

We're not parting mothers and babies on the Canadian border now, are we?

Well, that might come later, if that wall gets built and those who would be "illegals" notice it doesn't extend that far and they decide to start coming in through that wide open spot (those who decide NOT to stay in Canada, because no family there ;) ) probably into Montana.  I'll stop now as to avoid getting shuttled off to the "off topic" page.

Sepiatone

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
15 minutes ago, Sgt_Markoff said:

You'll always be her little bouncing boy, Dargo! Don't kid yourself with these Audie Murphy fantasies!

Funny you mentioned this, Sarge.

Because I'd be an American of a certain age, and because for years she didn't know what had become of me once she gave me up for adoption, she told me she always worried about with me being a Yank, I might have been drafted during the Vietnam War and perhaps had been sent over there and never to return.

(...that's when I told her I pretty much lucked out in this regard, and in 1970 when I turned 18 my Draft Lottery birthday date was not pulled until the 360th time out of that pool, hence no chance of being drafted...I'll never forget how happy my parents were about this too)

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
59 minutes ago, misswonderly3 said:

Interesting, some of the first things that come to mind for many Americans...Mounted Police, (that includes all those execrable Mountie movies), hockey, cold weather, poutine, and some good stuff, too (like all the great Canadian music, such as The Band and the Crash Test Dummies).

First thing I think of:

bob-and-doug1.jpg

 

  • Like 1
  • Haha 5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Det Jim McLeod said:

That's the first one I thought of when thinking of Canadian musicians. "Sundown" is my favorite song by him.

Gene Tierney better take care if I find she's been creeping round my back stairs.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 minutes ago, Fedya said:

Gene Tierney better take care if I find she's been creeping round my back stairs.

You know that was based on a real woman who Lightfoot knew, right. If we could only read his mind...

  • Haha 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

And now, due to popular demand, here's CANADIAN SUNSET, courtesy the King of Cool:

 

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
14 hours ago, Stephan55 said:

Oh I caught your smile :) and responded in kind with a wink ;)
I knew that you were just josh'n, and my response wasn't seriously serious either.

But kidding aside, I have seen various TCM channels (in english) on those rare occasions when I have treated myself to a hotel room while abroad. And yes, it was like a lulling "taste" of home.... Sorta like those ubiquitous MacDonald's that seem to appear in practically every major city across the globe.
So there is a bit of truth within our comedy. ;):)

There is often some truth in our japes, no doubt about it. TCM and McDonalds are what

America means to me :). I got a laugh of of the Jimmy Stewart/Robert Mitchum documentary

last night with the footage of Bob talking to the troops in Vietnam. Okay boys, let's smoke

a little weed and then you go out and kill some red commie bastards. I'll stay here and roll a

few more.

  • Like 1
  • Haha 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
44 minutes ago, TomJH said:

And now, due to popular demand, here's CANADIAN SUNSET, courtesy the King of Cool:

 

 

The George Shearing version is nice too.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I like Gordon Lightfoot, but I have a bad memory of listening to Gord's Gold while

stuck in a horrendous traffic jam around D.C., but I forgave him a long time ago. :)

 

 

 

  • Like 2
  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 minutes ago, Vautrin said:

I like Gordon Lightfoot, but I have a bad memory of listening to Gord's Gold while

stuck in a horrendous traffic jam around D.C., but I forgave him a long time ago. :)

 

 

 

That's what you get for lovin' him!

The best "how to dump a former suitor and blame them for picking you" song of all time.

  • Haha 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, GordonCole said:

That's what you get for lovin' him!

The best "how to dump a former suitor and blame them for picking you" song of all time.

Of course the fact that I was listening to Gordon Lightfoot at the time was purely

coincidental. I had a whole seat full of CDs with me. Maybe Gordo was somewhat

of a reverse inspiration for George Costanza's 'it's not you, it's me' routine.

  • Haha 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 1/13/2019 at 2:51 PM, misswonderly3 said:

This is the final outrage: I check out the TCM schedule for Monday night (January 14th) at 8:00 pm, and see a "TCM Presents" Special. Oh good, I like those "TCM Presents" mini-docs. They're usually fun and interesting. And -sweet ! -this one's about two of my favourite classic era actors, James Stewart and Robert Mitchum. Good, this will be so much fun to watch, I'll make sure I remember to turn on TCM at 7:50 pm, some good programming to look forward to.

But NO !  For some reason, even this, an original TCM documentary, is NOT AVAILABLE IN CANADA. But why not? This is not an old movie, it can't be part of that tangled "rights" web I was just talking about . It's a TCM original presentation. I was so disappointed, and so puzzled as to why even this can't be shown in Canada, I just had to vent.

 

I too was so disappointed...and I watched it. :blink:

Recently viewed an HBO documentary during one of their "free" weekends entitled "Jane Fonda in Five Acts" (2018), which was very good and on Friday PBS aired an American Masters episode entitled "By Sidney Lumet" (2017) and the previous week one entitled "Norman Lear" (2016) BOTH of which were very entertaining. 👍

💋

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That 2015 movie, BEING CANADIAN, was pretty good, I thought.

But nothing compares to Rick Mercer's haughty, brilliant TALKING TO AMERICANS. "Congratulations Canada for adopting the 24 hour clock!" (anyone recall idiot politician Mike Huckabee's congratulation?)

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I too really enjoyed Gordon Lightfoot back in the day (now that I think about it, I still do!).
In fact I am now thinking of one GL favorite after another.... "For Lovin' Me", "Early Morning Rain", "If You Could Read My Mind", "Sundown", "Carefree Highway", "Rainy Day People", and "The Wreck of the Edmund Fitzgerald",....
As I continue to write I am now  listening to my mp3 collection of Gordies Best and Greatest Hits! :)

But along with that train of thought, I just remembered a couple of not so fun Canadian experiences (or rather experiences with Canadians). :(

First Story: I was driving in BC on the Alcan hwy one winter in the 1980's.
I was on a narrow, winding Rocky Mountain road and it was a clear moonlit night. I was pulling a trailer and trying to be as cautiously careful as I could, when a cow and calf moose decided to cross the road immediately ahead of me.
I wasn't going very fast at the time as the roads were slick with snow and ice, but even at around 25 mph they were too close for me to avoid. Rather than get off the road they stayed right in the middle of it and tried to outrun me. I tried veering as best I could to the right and then the left while tapping my breaks to slow down, but mom veered with me, staying in my headlights. I tapped her butt with my brush guard and she then moved off the road into a ditch, but when the calf tried to follow her I bumped it too, and it went down.
I felt it beneath the center of my truck as it bumped into the transmission guard plate, between my wheels as I ran over it.
I finally managed to pull over as far to the right of the road as I dared without getting stuck into the ditch. I grabbed my flashlight and walked back to where the little moose lie.
Mom moved up the hill along the side of the road and I could see her silhouetted against the moonlight. She began to bellow at me just like a roaring bear, but didn't charge down after me.
The calf was not dead, and tried to get away from me but couldn't.
There was blood and urine glistening in the center of the road, and when I approached and examined the calf I could see that it's pelvis was broken.
I went back to my truck and examined the front and undercarriage. It appeared undamaged but there was moose hide and hair stuck to the transmission shield where the calf had evidently been dragged along the road, causing the injury.
The calf would continue to suffer until it either froze or was dispatched by wolves.
I kept an over and under double barrel 20 gauge/.22 combo rifle/shotgun in the back of the cab and decided to put the calf out of it's misery.
I kept my flashers on and brought a lantern along with my skinning knife.

In Alaska people are always on a list for moose road kill, and anyone who hit and killed a moose was obligated to report it to the authorities as soon as possible.
I shot the calf in the head with the .22 barrel and proceeded to field dress it on the side of the road.
Young moose stay with their mothers for about two years, or until mom drops another calf. This one had likely been born late in the season of the previous spring and would have been at least 6-7 months old. It probably weighed in the neighborhood of three hundred pounds or so, after pulling the guts out so it would quickly cool.

A trucker came along and stopped. He saw that my clothes had blood on them and asked if I needed any help.
I explained what happened and he told me that the nearest Mounties were in Fort St. John, another fifty plus miles down the highway.
My trailer and truck were stuffed and I didn't feel like rearranging things to make room to carry the animal with me, and I didn't feel like quartering it at that cold and late hour. So after making note of the mile marker I drug the calf's carcass to the very edge of the roadside, and proceeded on my way.

It was still dark when I pulled into Fort Saint John and found the Mountie station.
I reported what had happened and when they saw my bloody clothes they asked if anyone was hurt or my vehicle damaged. When I said no, they just said I could go on my way and didn't bother asking the location of the moose carcass.
I volunteered that the field dressed carcass was on the mountain side of the hwy, at mile marker yada yada, and they just looked at me as if I were an idiot, and asked me why I had dressed the moose?
I explained that in Alaska it was required by law to do so, and report it so that persons on the "road kill list" could get the meat. 
The Mounties told me that they were unaware of any such Canadian regulation, but suggested that I talk to the fish and game dept. and report it to them.
They gave me directions to F&G but the office was closed until 0800 and it wasn't yet 0600. So I decided to wait. After all, I had done my part and wanted to make sure that the animal did not go to waste.
I slept in my truck until the F&G office opened and then went in and again explained what had happened.
The F&G officers patiently listened to my story and then queried if anyone was hurt or my truck was damaged, to which I replied No.
They then told me that there was no "road kill list" in BC and added that "Canada has lot's of moose," and they weren't going to send anyone out to collect the calf. So if nobody was hurt and my vehicle wasn't damaged that I was free to be on my way.
By this time I was too tired to get really mad at anyone, but I was also very disappointed to say the least.
I thought that the Alaska Road Kill list was a good idea, and couldn't imagine that there weren't Canadians in the neighborhood that might be happy to get that meat.
And after I had taken the time and trouble to immediately field dress it, I didn't want to think of it just going to waste.
Of course the local animals who found it would quickly consume it, so it really would not be "wasted" but had I known that would happen I wouldn't have gutted it.
I was half tempted to drive back, cut it up and bag it. But after a cool down period I decided to just do as I had been told, and continue on my way....

Second Story: I was traveling in Europe and riding on the night commuter train from Munchen.
It was late night-early morning and among the passengers there were a group of English speaking guys wearing BDU's (military "Battle Dress Uniforms").
I began talking with them and they shared that they were Canadian Reservists in Europe for a Joint Forces Exercise. They seemed pretty affable and I began sharing with them in return.

Suddenly a fight broke out on the train between two groups of locals.
My German is very poor but the guttural Germanic snarls and epithets being hurled among them along with flailing fists made it plain that these guys (and girls) had some serious damage in mind. One guy and girl were down, caught between the seats, and being kicked at by several persons standing above them.
Then, to my amazement, these "gentle" and mere moments before "friendly" Canadians, suddenly began egging them on.
The highest ranking NCO among them was an E8 (First Sergeant) who set the tone for his men by yelling "Kill them, Kill them, Kill the bastards."
Fortunately the train soon made a stop at the next small town and the smaller of the two "gangs" quickly exited, battered, bruised and bloody but alive and able to ambulate unassisted.
Another fortunate thing was that this was Germany and not the states, as in the U.S. such a confrontation would quickly have escalated to someone drawing a gun or pulling a knife.

The Canadian "soldiers" soon regained their composure and settled back down into their seats.
The First Sergeant must have read my bewildered and disappointed expression as he simply retorted "If people get  p i s s e d  at us we just tell them we're Americans."  "American's like to say 'Blame Canada' so we just play it in reverse and blame America."

Sadly I have seen way too many bad examples of arrogant and disrespectful behavior by "my" countrymen during travels within distant lands. But to witness these Canadians unabashedly take advantage of that by concealing their identity under the guise that they were just another bunch of "American's behaving badly," filled me with an air of disgust.
In fact, using that cover as an excuse to "get away" with bad behavior (that they likely wouldn't allow themselves to exercise if people around them knew that they were really Canadians, and in uniform no less) was inexcusable to me.

In the times that I wore the uniform and traveled abroad upon public conveyance with soldiers under my charge, I made it a strong point to emphasis that "we" (ourselves, our military and our country) were being judged on our behavior by persons wherever went. That we were U.S. ambassadors and needed to set a positive example to counter against all of the negative stereotypes.
So I found this particular behavior by our Canadian brethren in uniform to be particularly offensive.
I don't know how common this practice is among Canadians abroad, but it was made plain to me that this was far from the first time for this particular group of "soldiers."
And I use that term loosely as I place square blame on the officer or NCO in charge of their men to maintain discipline and control their troops, esp. while they are in uniform.


On a brighter note, I remember a Canadian film that I saw many years ago titled "Silence of the North" (1981).
It was a biographical drama about the life and times of Olive Frederickson, and adapted from her book.
It was directed by Allan King and featured Ellen Burstyn, Tom Skerritt, and Gordon Pinsent (among others) in sterling performances. With a memorable theme song, "Comes a Time" composed by Neil Young and performed by Lacy J. Dalton.
The movie was realistically filmed on location in the north country.

Olive Frederickson was an adventurous young girl who married young, had three young children, and was widowed young while living a rugged pioneer lifestyle in Alberta and the NW Territories during the first half of the 20th century.
The book is still in print and available and I see the movie is also available on DVD here
https://www.vermontmoviestore.com/products/silence-of-the-north

I first saw this movie in the early 1980's and was thoroughly entranced by it.
Would be really nice if TCM could manage to air it sometime (and make it available for viewing across the northern border as well). :)

 

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 1/21/2019 at 4:47 AM, TikiSoo said:

TLDR

"Too lazy, didn't read" ???
I had to look that acronym up...
Sorry you felt that way. Maybe you'll be more energized later. ;)

I actually thought that you had a very good attention span, and enjoyed reading a story every now and then.
And though I admit that they aren't very exciting stories, in the spirit of camaraderie with the "Canadian Bashing" posters on this thread, I wracked my brain to think of something sort of "anti-Canadian" to write about, and at that late hour this was the "best" that I could come up with.

I suppose that's what I get for mixing too much Irish whiskey with my Bryers, while listening to Gordon Lightfoot and reminiscing at the keyboard. But I was out of Bailey's Irish creme, and (to my immense pleasure) got hooked on that topping while in the north land.

Did you know (at that time anyway) Alaskans consumed more ice cream (per capita) than any other state in the U.S.?
Makes one think that there might actually be a hint of truth in
"selling ice cream to an Eskimo" (seems applicable to Alaskan's anyway). :)

Ever hear of Eskimo Ice Cream?
That's another story that you may not be interested in hearing (er reading) about, but I'd fathom you may have no idea what it's made of. -_-
Hint (in case you may be piqued) it's called Akutaq in Yup'ik. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
36 minutes ago, Stephan55 said:

"Too lazy, didn't read"
I had to look that acronym up...

I usually see it used to indicate "Too long, didn't read."

  • Sad 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, speedracer5 said:

I usually see it used to indicate "Too long, didn't read."

Now I feel wounded.... To my very core.:(             ;):)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 1/14/2019 at 5:36 PM, misswonderly3 said:

Which brings me to the final point I want to make here: One reason I started this thread was to see if anyone on these boards has any idea why all this "rights" business goes on all the time. Who are these mysterious people who own the rights to these old movies,that aren't going to make much money anymore anyway? Why does it keep changing ? (like, one year I'll be able to see "Random Harvest" on TCM, the next I won't. What the frig??)

Why is it so difficult to sort all this out, and why does it seem to be so much worse, so much more complicated, than it was even 5 years ago?

I was just sort of hoping someone might have some answers to these questions and could help me understand this a little better. After they'd made a few jokes about Mounties and hockey, of course.

It is my understanding that some of it may be due to protectionism. An American company wishing to sell rights to air a movie to a Canadian broadcaster might have to pay tariffs or higher taxes than a Canadian company would have to pay to sell the same rights to the same broadcaster. This led to the formation of many Canadian companies whose sole purpose for existing was to supposedly buy permanent licensing rights to a certain package of movies and then sell broadcasters short-term rights to individual movies. I know of a situation in Europe where a company attempting to sell rights to television program had to pay a separate import fee for each and every airing of each and every episode while local distributors could pay one fee when buying rights for an entire season and then resell at will. 

It is also that some studios established companies to distribute their movies in Canada because it meant having a local sales staff and greatly reducing the amount of paperwork, taxes and import fees normal in international transactions.

I believe that most of these created distributors were small and dwindled to being little more than legal fictions within a decade of their being formed. They were bought, sold and traded frequently because their potential income value was very near their cost of bookkeeping. I have been told that there are companies which have been surprised to learn that they own the distribution rights to a movie because they acquired it when they purchased an accounting company or real estate firm which had previously acquired the distribution company as part of some other deal.

Most of these distribution companies do not generate sufficient income to justify their current owners having a permanent staff dedicated to selling rights. This leads to deals being placed on back-burners or handed off to the least-competent/least-important of the owners' general staff.

Even those distribution companies which are large enough to be considered a separate division with its own staff are overwhelmed by the legal issues raised in the last decade concerning whether they own digital distribution rights such as streaming. 

The low income potential for distribution of old movies means that it is a very low priority for any company.

If that explanation has earned me the right to poke fun at Canada: 

https://i.imgur.com/W5N2uGX.gifv

  • Thanks 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yeah, well, I DID take the time to read all that, Stephan...YOU MOOSE KILLER, YOU!!! 

(...poor wittle moose)

;)

LOL

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 minutes ago, Dargo said:

Yeah, well, I DID take the time to read all that, Stephan...YOU MOOSE KILLER, YOU!!! 

(...poor wittle moose)

;)

LOL

Thanks Darg, now I feel worthwhile again.... :)

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I read your novella too Stephan55.  Ever thought about screenwriting?  I thought it was very informative and interesting.  A few weeks ago, I think it was Swithin that posted a detailed account of his time working at a Montana auto salvage yard.  That was interesting too.

1 hour ago, Dargo said:

Yeah, well, I DID take the time to read all that, Stephan...YOU MOOSE KILLER, YOU!!! 

(...poor wittle moose)

;)

LOL

Even young moose aren't to be trifled with, Darg.  The largest member of the deer family is notorious for being ill-tempered, especially during rutting season.  A few months before I arrived in New Hampshire for a new job several years ago, I learned that a woman was killed on Interstate 89 when her car struck a moose that was crossing the highway.  It's bad enough to hit a deer in my neighborhood.  Those things do a lot of damage to your wheels, but if you hit one, they go down easy.  Hitting a moose, on the other hand, is like hitting a brick wall!

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

New Members:

Register Here

Learn more about the new message boards:

FAQ

Having problems?

Contact Us