misswonderly3

NOW I'M REALLY MAD ! ! !

157 posts in this topic

1 minute ago, midwestan said:

I read your novella too Stephan55.  Ever thought about screenwriting?  I thought it was very informative and interesting.  A few weeks ago, I think it was Swithin that posted a detailed account of his time working at a Montana auto salvage yard.  That was interesting too.

I believe that was CigarJoe. From what I know of Swithin, I don't picture him ever having worked in a salvage yard. He did, however, regale us with a tale of almost dating Barbi Benton.

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1 minute ago, LawrenceA said:

I believe that was CigarJoe. From what I know of Swithin, I don't picture him ever having worked in a salvage yard. He did, however, regale us with a tale of almost dating Barbi Benton.

Thanks for the correction LawrenceA!  I thought it was either Swithin or CigarJoe...I knew it was someone with a New York connection.

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20 minutes ago, midwestan said:

 

...Even young moose aren't to be trifled with, Darg.  The largest member of the deer family is notorious for being ill-tempered, especially during rutting season.  A few months before I arrived in New Hampshire for a new job several years ago, I learned that a woman was killed on Interstate 89 when her car struck a moose that was crossing the highway.  It's bad enough to hit a deer in my neighborhood.  Those things do a lot of damage to your wheels, but if you hit one, they go down easy.  Hitting a moose, on the other hand, is like hitting a brick wall!

Oh, I know midwestan. Not that we have any Moose this far south around here in Arizona, but there ARE many an Elk herd roaming around not far from here up in the pine forests of northern AZ and around the Flagstaff area. And as you probably know, elk are almost as large as moose.

And, it seems every year at least one or more motorists are killed on Interstate-17(the main north-south route between Flagstaff and Phoenix that pretty much bisects this state) when they hit one of those big suckers.

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19 minutes ago, LawrenceA said:

I believe that was CigarJoe. From what I know of Swithin, I don't picture him ever having worked in a salvage yard. He did, however, regale us with a tale of almost dating Barbi Benton.

Hmmm...funny, I don't remember Swithin telling this one.

So kind'a like that tale I told recently about almost dating Jennifer O'Neill, eh?!

(...saaaay, THAT might make for a fun thread: "Which celeb did YOU almost date back in the day?")

;)

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13 minutes ago, Dargo said:

Oh, I know midwestan. Not that we have any Moose this far south around here in Arizona, but there ARE many an Elk herd roaming around not far from here up in the pine forests of northern AZ and around the Flagstaff area. And as you probably know, elk are almost as large as moose.

And, it seems every year at least one or more motorists are killed on Interstate-17(the main north-south route between Flagstaff and Phoenix that pretty much bisects this state) when they hit one of those big suckers.

In a tragic way, it sort of brings the phrase, "Large and in charge" into sharper focus.

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4 minutes ago, Dargo said:

Hmmm...funny, I don't remember Swithin telling this one.

With all due credit to Swithin, here's his post from the "I Just Watched" thread from last Friday afternoon ET:

"I grew up in a building in the Bronx. Barbi's paternal grandparents lived there. Perhaps her father had grown up there as well. In any case, when I was about 14, Barbi (or Barbara), who would have been about the same age, came in from California. Her grandmother (Dora Klein) asked my mother if I would be willing to take Barbi to the New York World's Fair. I declined. I don't know why -- I guess I knew I was gay at that age, but still, it was just a trip to the World's Fair, which I had already been to, and enjoyed very much. 

On the other hand, who knows what might have developed. Maybe I would have turned straight; and maybe Barbi would never have met Hugh Hefner. In any case, neither of those two possibilities is bloody likely to have happened!"

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Know who Barbi Benton always reminded me of?

Nanette Fabray.

(...same nose)

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and maybe Barbi would never have met Hugh Hefner.

That was one very nice thing about the pre-digital era. You could meet a fellow human being by pure chance, and that meeting might change the course of your life, or their life. You could meet someone and wind up remaining with them forever. Now people glance at you, and then glance back at their phone, glance up when you say something, then glance back down again....

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45 minutes ago, Sgt_Markoff said:

That was one very nice thing about the pre-digital era. You could meet a fellow human being by pure chance, and that meeting might change the course of your life, or their life. You could meet someone and wind up remaining with them forever. Now people glance at you, and then glance back at their phone, glance up when you say something, then glance back down again....

Sad, but true Sarge...sad, but true.

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5 hours ago, Stephan55 said:

"Too lazy, didn't read"
I had to look that acronym up...

I always thought it was "Too long; didn't read".

Edit: I see other people beat me to the punch.

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Ya know, my father owned a Lincoln TLDR back in the day. And boy, what a big boat of a car THAT ever was!

(...oh...wait...that was a Lincoln LTD...sorry, never mind)

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2 hours ago, Dargo said:

Ya know, my father owned a Lincoln TLDR back in the day. And boy, what a big boat of a car THAT ever was!

(...oh...wait...that was a Lincoln LTD...sorry, never mind)

I drove an LTD when I was in college.  And you're right...that thing was like a boat compared to other cars on campus!  In March, 1980 myself and 6 other crazy college kids piled into that beast and drove from Peoria, Illinois to Denton, Texas to watch our school in the NCAA Tournament's Midwest Regional.  Ah...the memories!

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3 hours ago, Fedya said:

I always thought it was "Too long; didn't read".

Edit: I see other people beat me to the punch.

I think the "too lazy" part was supposed to be a bit of a jab.

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14 hours ago, midwestan said:

I read your novella too Stephan55.

:lol:

14 hours ago, midwestan said:

Ever thought about screenwriting?

I actually have given some thought about that on more than one occasion.
I used to regularly have quite lucid dreams, and would write them down as soon as I awoke whenever the time allowed.
Some were just like watching or being part of a movie and I felt certain at the time that they would have been a perfect fit for Steven Spielberg's "Amazing Stories" back then.

But most of what I write and share here (and elsewhere) are snippets of reminisces of past life experiences.
I did keep personal journals back in those days and would detail whatever I observed and thought about during my "adventures" even down to the minutiae of temperature and weather changes. 
But those are stories that I have willingly "given away" over the years, to any with an apparent interest (and, as evidenced here, to many who have not the slightest interest).
My mind easily strays into various tangents, and I can relate one subject to another by the slenderest of threads.

I've always been a "story teller" even in my youth, and sometimes I can spin a pretty good yarn. But these days, for the most part, it's just me being an old *f*a*r*t  wanting to tell someone something that they might find of passing trivial interest.
Of course, like any story teller, I always appreciate it when an "audience" enjoys the tale once told. :)

Dargo and I share a youthful sense of time and place, so it is often easy for us to relate to each other here. ;)

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6 hours ago, Gershwin fan said:

I think the "too lazy" part was supposed to be a bit of a jab.

Well, yes, I was trying to make "light" of my loquacious embarrassment ... :rolleyes:
But the "too lazy" part is actually part of an extended (albeit less often used) alternate definition, so I decided to use it. -_- 

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13 hours ago, Dargo said:

Know who Barbi Benton always reminded me of?

Nanette Fabray.

(...same nose)

Ahhh yes, Barbie Benton.
I remember, ahem, "reading" those Playboy "articles" about Barbie back in the day, and from the "discriptions" she was quite a lovely to look at girl.... ;)

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22 hours ago, Dargo said:

Yeah, well, I DID take the time to read all that, Stephan...YOU MOOSE KILLER, YOU!!! 

(...poor wittle moose)

;)

LOL

I liked the story with the Canadian soldiers. :lol: 

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On 1/21/2019 at 3:00 AM, Stephan55 said:

I too really enjoyed Gordon Lightfoot back in the day (now that I think about it, I still do!).
In fact I am now thinking of one GL favorite after another.... "For Lovin' Me", "Early Morning Rain", "If You Could Read My Mind", "Sundown", "Carefree Highway", "Rainy Day People", and "The Wreck of the Edmund Fitzgerald",....
As I continue to write I am now  listening to my mp3 collection of Gordies Best and Greatest Hits! :)

But along with that train of thought, I just remembered a couple of not so fun Canadian experiences (or rather experiences with Canadians). :(

First Story: I was driving in BC on the Alcan hwy one winter in the 1980's.
I was on a narrow, winding Rocky Mountain road and it was a clear moonlit night. I was pulling a trailer and trying to be as cautiously careful as I could, when a cow and calf moose decided to cross the road immediately ahead of me.
I wasn't going very fast at the time as the roads were slick with snow and ice, but even at around 25 mph they were too close for me to avoid. Rather than get off the road they stayed right in the middle of it and tried to outrun me. I tried veering as best I could to the right and then the left while tapping my breaks to slow down, but mom veered with me, staying in my headlights. I tapped her butt with my brush guard and she then moved off the road into a ditch, but when the calf tried to follow her I bumped it too, and it went down.
I felt it beneath the center of my truck as it bumped into the transmission guard plate, between my wheels as I ran over it.
I finally managed to pull over as far to the right of the road as I dared without getting stuck into the ditch. I grabbed my flashlight and walked back to where the little moose lie.
Mom moved up the hill along the side of the road and I could see her silhouetted against the moonlight. She began to bellow at me just like a roaring bear, but didn't charge down after me.
The calf was not dead, and tried to get away from me but couldn't.
There was blood and urine glistening in the center of the road, and when I approached and examined the calf I could see that it's pelvis was broken.
I went back to my truck and examined the front and undercarriage. It appeared undamaged but there was moose hide and hair stuck to the transmission shield where the calf had evidently been dragged along the road, causing the injury.
The calf would continue to suffer until it either froze or was dispatched by wolves.
I kept an over and under double barrel 20 gauge/.22 combo rifle/shotgun in the back of the cab and decided to put the calf out of it's misery.
I kept my flashers on and brought a lantern along with my skinning knife.

In Alaska people are always on a list for moose road kill, and anyone who hit and killed a moose was obligated to report it to the authorities as soon as possible.
I shot the calf in the head with the .22 barrel and proceeded to field dress it on the side of the road.
Young moose stay with their mothers for about two years, or until mom drops another calf. This one had likely been born late in the season of the previous spring and would have been at least 6-7 months old. It probably weighed in the neighborhood of three hundred pounds or so, after pulling the guts out so it would quickly cool.

A trucker came along and stopped. He saw that my clothes had blood on them and asked if I needed any help.
I explained what happened and he told me that the nearest Mounties were in Fort St. John, another fifty plus miles down the highway.
My trailer and truck were stuffed and I didn't feel like rearranging things to make room to carry the animal with me, and I didn't feel like quartering it at that cold and late hour. So after making note of the mile marker I drug the calf's carcass to the very edge of the roadside, and proceeded on my way.

It was still dark when I pulled into Fort Saint John and found the Mountie station.
I reported what had happened and when they saw my bloody clothes they asked if anyone was hurt or my vehicle damaged. When I said no, they just said I could go on my way and didn't bother asking the location of the moose carcass.
I volunteered that the field dressed carcass was on the mountain side of the hwy, at mile marker yada yada, and they just looked at me as if I were an idiot, and asked me why I had dressed the moose?
I explained that in Alaska it was required by law to do so, and report it so that persons on the "road kill list" could get the meat. 
The Mounties told me that they were unaware of any such Canadian regulation, but suggested that I talk to the fish and game dept. and report it to them.
They gave me directions to F&G but the office was closed until 0800 and it wasn't yet 0600. So I decided to wait. After all, I had done my part and wanted to make sure that the animal did not go to waste.
I slept in my truck until the F&G office opened and then went in and again explained what had happened.
The F&G officers patiently listened to my story and then queried if anyone was hurt or my truck was damaged, to which I replied No.
They then told me that there was no "road kill list" in BC and added that "Canada has lot's of moose," and they weren't going to send anyone out to collect the calf. So if nobody was hurt and my vehicle wasn't damaged that I was free to be on my way.
By this time I was too tired to get really mad at anyone, but I was also very disappointed to say the least.
I thought that the Alaska Road Kill list was a good idea, and couldn't imagine that there weren't Canadians in the neighborhood that might be happy to get that meat.
And after I had taken the time and trouble to immediately field dress it, I didn't want to think of it just going to waste.
Of course the local animals who found it would quickly consume it, so it really would not be "wasted" but had I known that would happen I wouldn't have gutted it.
I was half tempted to drive back, cut it up and bag it. But after a cool down period I decided to just do as I had been told, and continue on my way....

Second Story: I was traveling in Europe and riding on the night commuter train from Munchen.
It was late night-early morning and among the passengers there were a group of English speaking guys wearing BDU's (military "Battle Dress Uniforms").
I began talking with them and they shared that they were Canadian Reservists in Europe for a Joint Forces Exercise. They seemed pretty affable and I began sharing with them in return.

Suddenly a fight broke out on the train between two groups of locals.
My German is very poor but the guttural Germanic snarls and epithets being hurled among them along with flailing fists made it plain that these guys (and girls) had some serious damage in mind. One guy and girl were down, caught between the seats, and being kicked at by several persons standing above them.
Then, to my amazement, these "gentle" and mere moments before "friendly" Canadians, suddenly began egging them on.
The highest ranking NCO among them was an E8 (First Sergeant) who set the tone for his men by yelling "Kill them, Kill them, Kill the bastards."
Fortunately the train soon made a stop at the next small town and the smaller of the two "gangs" quickly exited, battered, bruised and bloody but alive and able to ambulate unassisted.
Another fortunate thing was that this was Germany and not the states, as in the U.S. such a confrontation would quickly have escalated to someone drawing a gun or pulling a knife.

The Canadian "soldiers" soon regained their composure and settled back down into their seats.
The First Sergeant must have read my bewildered and disappointed expression as he simply retorted "If people get  p i s s e d  at us we just tell them we're Americans."  "American's like to say 'Blame Canada' so we just play it in reverse and blame America."

Sadly I have seen way too many bad examples of arrogant and disrespectful behavior by "my" countrymen during travels within distant lands. But to witness these Canadians unabashedly take advantage of that by concealing their identity under the guise that they were just another bunch of "American's behaving badly," filled me with an air of disgust.
In fact, using that cover as an excuse to "get away" with bad behavior (that they likely wouldn't allow themselves to exercise if people around them knew that they were really Canadians, and in uniform no less) was inexcusable to me.

In the times that I wore the uniform and traveled abroad upon public conveyance with soldiers under my charge, I made it a strong point to emphasis that "we" (ourselves, our military and our country) were being judged on our behavior by persons wherever went. That we were U.S. ambassadors and needed to set a positive example to counter against all of the negative stereotypes.
So I found this particular behavior by our Canadian brethren in uniform to be particularly offensive.
I don't know how common this practice is among Canadians abroad, but it was made plain to me that this was far from the first time for this particular group of "soldiers."
And I use that term loosely as I place square blame on the officer or NCO in charge of their men to maintain discipline and control their troops, esp. while they are in uniform.


On a brighter note, I remember a Canadian film that I saw many years ago titled "Silence of the North" (1981).
It was a biographical drama about the life and times of Olive Frederickson, and adapted from her book.
It was directed by Allan King and featured Ellen Burstyn, Tom Skerritt, and Gordon Pinsent (among others) in sterling performances. With a memorable theme song, "Comes a Time" composed by Neil Young and performed by Lacy J. Dalton.
The movie was realistically filmed on location in the north country.

Olive Frederickson was an adventurous young girl who married young, had three young children, and was widowed young while living a rugged pioneer lifestyle in Alberta and the NW Territories during the first half of the 20th century.
The book is still in print and available and I see the movie is also available on DVD here
https://www.vermontmoviestore.com/products/silence-of-the-north

I first saw this movie in the early 1980's and was thoroughly entranced by it.
Would be really nice if TCM could manage to air it sometime (and make it available for viewing across the northern border as well). :)

 

 

On 1/21/2019 at 3:00 AM, Stephan55 said:

...there was moose hide and hair stuck to the transmission shield where the calf had evidently been dragged along the road, causing the injury.
So after making note of the mile marker I drug the calf's carcass to the very edge of the roadside, and proceeded on my way.
 

 

Moose Killer!

Are you sure this was not a Bob Clark movie you saw that you then dreamt happened in real life?

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21 hours ago, Dargo said:

Know who Barbi Benton always reminded me of?

Nanette Fabray.

(...same nose)

You forgot also Paul Williams who had the same nose too.

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Taking it from grandpa and all Barbi got was a gig on Hee Haw. :(

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the tcm programmers appear to be trolling us canadians slightly with a night of mountie films on april 30th

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Quote

the tcm programmers appear to be trolling us canadians slightly with a night of mountie films

--hutz

:angry: That's unparalleled!

650px-49th_parallel_US_Canada_border.svg

 

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I see a long, straight line athwart a continent. No chain of forts, or deep flowing river, or mountain range, but a line drawn by men upon a map, nearly a century ago, accepted with a handshake, and kept ever since.

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3 hours ago, Fedya said:

I see a long, straight line athwart a continent. No chain of forts, or deep flowing river, or mountain range, but a line drawn by men upon a map, nearly a century ago, accepted with a handshake, and kept ever since.

Forty_ninth_parallel_(1941).jpg

(...good flick too)

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