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NipkowDisc

colorizing deserves another shot

54 posts in this topic

3 hours ago, NipkowDisc said:

then you confirm that colorizing is practical...

now this is what tcm could do. show the two colorized films I have mentioned. Mr. Blandings Builds His Dream House and chain lightning and let the tcm viewing audience decide. both colorized films were syndicated nationally AND I HAVE NOT SEEN THEM SINCE.

tcm oughta show 'em, both of 'um. let tcm viewers watch a colorized JA-3 shoot up to the upper atmosphere with bogie at the stick. 

"give these things a chance. you'll love them!" -felix, odd couple ep 'take my furniture, please'

Image result for odd couple take my furniture please

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I am not advocating anything though.  Just trying to figure out what is happening and why. 

Above all else, that doesn't broadly translate into me advocating the colorizing of old B&W movies, because I wouldn't.  ;)

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M.C.Ohio- would you mind explaining the modern computer colorizing process to me?

I always imagined it would be the same as colorizing a b&w photo (like with "photo oils"-yes I've done that!) But done in a computer program like PhotoShop, where everything is easier to duplicate  over several frames rather than each frame individually. (like the early colored "dancing butterflies" that were hand painted and the color varies widely between frames)

So colors are chosen, then just dropped transparently over the blacks/grays/whites? A red dress would be colored with transparent red over the entire dress area, creating gray/red "shading"?

If you were hand coloring, you'd add a bit of brown to the gray "shading" to warm it up, is that done with computer colorization? Are all the "blacks" shaded up to say 85% gray to take the extra color?

I hear you about sit-com consistent lighting.

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Like I usually say, in these times of recorded and consumer "ownership" of some copy of a particular movie.

If someone PREFERS a "colorized" version of a movie originally shot on B&W stock, then make the choice available. NObody is obligated or compelled to LIKE it!  

And TOO, like I claim....

Colorizing a black&white movie DOESN'T necessarily make the movie BETTER.  ;)

Sepiatone

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7 hours ago, TikiSoo said:

M.C.Ohio- would you mind explaining the modern computer colorizing process to me?

I always imagined it would be the same as colorizing a b&w photo (like with "photo oils"-yes I've done that!) But done in a computer program like PhotoShop, where everything is easier to duplicate  over several frames rather than each frame individually. (like the early colored "dancing butterflies" that were hand painted and the color varies widely between frames)

So colors are chosen, then just dropped transparently over the blacks/grays/whites? A red dress would be colored with transparent red over the entire dress area, creating gray/red "shading"?

If you were hand coloring, you'd add a bit of brown to the gray "shading" to warm it up, is that done with computer colorization? Are all the "blacks" shaded up to say 85% gray to take the extra color?

I hear you about sit-com consistent lighting.

Yes, except they would go one step further.  Some of the features like those you might be expecting are incorporated into higher-end video editing software, others might only be available as licensed third-party "plug-ins" which the user might purchase and add as needed (at least that has been done in the audio production world).  Photoshop used to be quite expensive, possibly still is, because it came with a bunch of third-party licensed filters and plug-ins.  Getting everything under one hood though makes the work flow more streamlined and efficient. 

Not sure which product might be chosen to colorize those B&W TV shows, it would depend on whichever one has the best tools available at the time to get the job done.  Adobe After Effects is just one consumer-oriented product I can think of off the top of my head.  It allows for some degree of creative input by the user, and it has been used by some to touch up flaws on old films.  With a studio budget and big purchasing power, they can always get something newer and better, maybe even commission its development.  If I were them, I wouldn't bother with this if it were just for the purposes of colorization (SMH).

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