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Philip Muldoon

The Ghost and Mrs. Muir

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When the conversation at parties gets around to naming the ten films you would take with you on a deserted island, I always include The Ghost and Mrs. Muir.  I love this film, I love Gene Tierney in it and expect to be waiting for my true love in the same fashion as the Captain.

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Stunning movie (and classic stars!) but this is one of the most depressing films ever made, I think.

Just saying...

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2 hours ago, papyrusbeetle said:

Stunning movie (and classic stars!) but this is one of the most depressing films ever made, I think.

Just saying...

I agree;   First her husband and father of her child,  dies;  one has to assume she loved him.

Then she falls in love with a married man that deceived her.    

So after this major failure,  she decides it is better to be in love with a ghost,  waiting until she dies to really have a relationship.

AND I'm supposed to view all of this as romantic!       

 

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37 minutes ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

I agree;   First her husband and father of her child,  dies;  one has to assume she loved him.

Then she falls in love with a married man that deceived her.    

So after this major failure,  she decides it is better to be in love with a ghost,  waiting until she dies to really have a relationship.

AND I'm supposed to view all of this as romantic!       

 

Lucy makes it VERY clear that she did not love her husband. She cared about him but he was not her great love.She thought he was boring,  and that Edwin her husband could never have built a home like Gull Cottage he didn't have that sort of imagination, she tells the Captain her feelings about him, so the assumption you've made is incorrect.

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38 minutes ago, lavenderblue19 said:

Lucy makes it VERY clear that she did not love her husband. She cared about him but he was not her great love.She thought he was boring,  and that Edwin her husband could never have built a home like Gull Cottage he didn't have that sort of imagination, she tells the Captain her feelings about him, so the assumption you've made is incorrect.

Thanks for that info;   It makes the story of her life even more depressing.   

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LOL You'd have to believe in the After Life which you obviously don't.

The Ghost and Mrs. Muir is a beautiful film imo. The music (btw, it was Hermann's favorite score that he wrote) was magnificent. The cast, acting, scenery was great. Lucy lived her life the way she wanted to. She loved her home, the sea, her daughter and  her walks along the beach with her dog. She had enough money from the book she and the Captain wrote so she didn't have that stress. She had her daughter and Martha for company. She had the choice to live with her daughter and her new husband in her old age but decided not to. Lucy just wanted a quiet, unstressed life and that's what she got.  She lived her life the way she wanted and I don't think that's depressing. Her reward came in the after life and in order to not be "depressed" at the film's end, you have to be a believer that that's possible.

All in all I think the Ghost and Mrs. Muir is a truly wonderful film.

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47 minutes ago, lavenderblue19 said:

LOL You'd have to believe in the After Life which you obviously don't.

The Ghost and Mrs. Muir is a beautiful film imo. The music (btw, it was Hermann's favorite score that he wrote) was magnificent. The cast, acting, scenery was great. Lucy lived her life the way she wanted to. She loved her home, the sea, her daughter and  her walks along the beach with her dog. She had enough money from the book she and the Captain wrote so she didn't have that stress. She had her daughter and Martha for company. She had the choice to live with her daughter and her new husband in her old age but decided not to. Lucy just wanted a quiet, unstressed life and that's what she got.  She lived her life the way she wanted and I don't think that's depressing. Her reward came in the after life and in order to not be "depressed" at the film's end, you have to be a believer that that's possible.

All in all I think the Ghost and Mrs. Muir is a truly wonderful film.

My view of this film has nothing to do with if there is a so called 'after life' or not.

To NOT seek love in THIS life on EARTH because one is waiting for true love in the after life,  is sad IMO.

Yea, I know it is just a movie,  and one is suppose to overlook the above and just focus on the great romance that is too come once they both pass on from THIS life.     

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Just now, jamesjazzguitar said:

My view of this film has nothing to do with if there is a so called 'after life' or not.

To NOT seek love in THIS life on EARTH because one is waiting for true love in the after life,  is sad IMO.

Yea, I know it is just a movie,  and one is suppose to overlook the above and just focus on the great romance that is too come once they both pass on from THIS life.     

Yes, but that's your view of a happy fulfilled life. It wasn't Lucy's. She was hurt by the George Sander's character and that was enough for her. As I said, her daughter, her home, her friendship with Martha, the walks on the beach, the sea were enough for her. She didn't need "to seek Love in this life" to be happy and fulfilled. She was happy and fulfilled and tells her daughter so towards the end of the film. You are putting what you believe makes for a happy life instead of understanding that that's not what Lucy wanted. Her independence and living the way she wanted to was enough for her. Lucy didn't know that in the after life she and the Captain would be re-united, so that was not what her life was about. So again I'd say you are incorrect again when you say  that"she was waiting for true love in the after life". She was an independent woman who lived her life the way that made her feel happy and fulfilled.

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One of the powers of The Ghost and Mrs. Muir, I feel, is, combined with the romanticism, a sense of melancholy, particularly towards the end. It makes that ending, when the widow in death is finally reunited with the ghost of the sea captain all the more poignant. Bernard Herrmann's magnificent sweeping score, combined with the striking black and white photography, makes it somehow seem magical.

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Just now, TomJH said:

One of the powers of The Ghost and Mrs. Muir, I feel, is, combined with the romanticism, a sense of melancholy, particularly towards the end. It makes that ending, when the widow in death is finally reunited with the ghost of the sea captain all the more poignant. Bernard Herrmann's magnificent sweeping score, combined with the striking black and white photography, makes it somehow seem magical.

Exactly. I mentioned Hermann's magnificent score in my first post. It sets the tone of the film. Yes melancholy, but not depressing. Poignant is the right word Tom and I agree fully with you. It is a "magical"  beautiful film. the use of b&w was perfect for this film and if the film had been in color, it would have cheapened the film, just making it a typical love story rather than a romantic, magical film. Love this film and I've seen it dozens of times since childhood and I never tire of it.

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27 minutes ago, lavenderblue19 said:

Yes, but that's your view of a happy fulfilled life. It wasn't Lucy's. She was hurt by the George Sander's character and that was enough for her. As I said, her daughter, her home, her friendship with Martha, the walks on the beach, the sea were enough for her. She didn't need "to seek Love in this life" to be happy and fulfilled. She was happy and fulfilled and tells her daughter so towards the end of the film. You are putting what you believe makes for a happy life instead of understanding that that's not what Lucy wanted. Her independence and living the way she wanted to was enough for her. Lucy didn't know that in the after life she and the Captain would be re-united, so that was not what her life was about. So again I'd say you are incorrect again when you say  that"she was waiting for true love in the after life". She was an independent woman who lived her life the way that made her feel happy and fulfilled.

I find a movie like A Guy Named Joe which has a similar theme to be a lot more romantic.    To me that film expresses what I find to be true love by all involved,  especially Joe.  

Note I do enjoy TGAMM,  it is a well made film,  with fine performances (Sanders especially is at his cad-best).

 

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Life has not gone for Mrs. Muir as she would have desired it but she soldiers on and never feels sorry for herself. She learns to live independently despite life's setbacks, and there's something to admire about her there. She at least has solid one friendship with her housekeeper (for whom I could feel sorry at the very end, except that the film is not about her).

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4 minutes ago, TomJH said:

Life has not gone for Mrs. Muir as she would have desired it but she soldiers on and never feels sorry for herself. She learns to live independently despite life's setbacks, and there's something to admire about her there. She at least has solid one friendship with her housekeeper (for whom I could feel sorry at the very end, except that the film is not about her).

Very true although from the start, Lucy took the independent way by refusing to live with her in-laws and living in a more secluded place away from the town by the sea.

It's interesting that you mention Martha, that's always something that I've always thought about, what would happen to Martha. To console myself about Martha, I think she probably goes to live with Anna (Lucy's daughter) and her husband. Anna I don't think would let Martha be alone. There's a lot of love and caring between all the characters in the film.

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2 minutes ago, lavenderblue19 said:

Very true although from the start, Lucy took the independent way by refusing to live with her in-laws and living in a more secluded place away from the town by the sea.

It's interesting that you mention Martha, that's always something that I've always thought about, what would happen to Martha. To console myself about Martha, I think she probably goes to live with Anna (Lucy's daughter) and her husband. Anna I don't think would let Martha be alone. There's a lot of love and caring between all the characters in the film.

Maybe Martha would find companionship somewhere else. We don't know. I do have feelings of sorrow for her at the end. We last see her going up the stairs, not knowing she has just lost her only companion and friend.

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2 minutes ago, TomJH said:

Maybe Martha would find companionship somewhere else. We don't know. I do have feelings of sorrow for her at the end. We last see her going up the stairs, not knowing she has just lost her only companion and friend.

Yes and when the shock of finding Lucy settles down, then think of Martha the way I always have. She'll live with Anna and her husband and she won't be alone. The Captain left Gull Cottage to retired seamen  and maybe provisions were left for Martha to stay on but I think she'd prefer to live with Anna. 

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There was a mention here about the score, it was awesome.  Little trivia, it was the first film that Fox played during the intro when the Fox logo appeared on screen.

She never loved her husband, she was vulnerable when she fell for the cad...  Let's face it, she was sitting at home collaborating with a ghost on a book about the life of a seaman, she had to question her own sanity at times.  For me it was never depressing as some have said.  It was so romantic, the idea that she could love this being and after enduring the life she chose finally can be with him.  It gives me hope!

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I much agree with Lavender & Tom JH's impressions.

I don't find the story depressing & I do not believe in the afterlife although my favorite movies have to do with fantasy/angels/ghosts.

Real life is not perfect...a happy ending...many are faced with difficulties, even tragedies. I like this strong woman, her story and am inspired by it. It was one of the first DVD I ever bought and deserves another viewing. 

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9 hours ago, TikiSoo said:

I much agree with Lavender & Tom JH's impressions.

I don't find the story depressing & I do not believe in the afterlife although my favorite movies have to do with fantasy/angels/ghosts.

Real life is not perfect...a happy ending...many are faced with difficulties, even tragedies. I like this strong woman, her story and am inspired by it. It was one of the first DVD I ever bought and deserves another viewing. 

Belief in an after life must be very comforting for those who have it.

In the meanwhile many of us suspend any disbelief when we watch the movies. That final image in The Ghost and Mrs. Muir remains haunting, not only, I suspect, because of its stunning combination of music and photography but because it appeals to the viewer's wish that there can be a romantic rendezvous in the hereafter, even for those who failed to find it in life.

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