GordonCole

What are you reading

86 posts in this topic

7 hours ago, BingFan said:

I assume you're referring to my comparison of the chart histories of Bing Crosby and the Beatles, among others.  You're absolutely right that the Beatles' chart success, 68 records during seven years, is very impressive.  Crosby's chart history (396 records) covered 35 years (1927 to 1962), so he obviously had much longer to build his record.  On average, Crosby (about 11 charting records per year) is only slightly ahead of the Beatles (about 10 per year).

No matter how the numbers stack up, though, I love listening to both Crosby and the Beatles.

 

I do notice that when people compare the Beatles' sales records to others, they sometimes

disregard the fact that the Beatles had a fairly short career compared to performers like Bing,

Sinatra, Elvis and others. The Beatles do have the most number one records on the Billboard

Hot 100 chart. Since it started in 1958 it does disadvantage earlier artists like Bing and Frank.

I like Bing Crosby, though I can't say I listen to his music very often.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 2/6/2019 at 7:23 PM, LiamCasey said:

Charlotte’s Web by E. B. White. Obviously my current reading is not as esoteric as LawrenceA’s!

Good children's books are just as appropriate to read as so-called adult books are. This is just as true for adults as it is for children. Good for you, LiamCasey !

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 2/8/2019 at 1:33 PM, Sgt_Markoff said:

Warren Zevon is a hero of mine. When told unequivocally by his doctors that he only had six months or so to live, he quipped, "Damn, I guess this means I'm gonna miss the next James Bond film..." ^_^

It is a little-known fact that actually Warren Zevon did not die, but turned into a werewolf (of London.)

  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 2/8/2019 at 1:38 PM, Sgt_Markoff said:

Well said BingFan. Just a remark in passing: I seem to recall my own favorite Bing performance was in Odets' "The Country Girl" co-starring Holden and Kelly. He was very touching as the reforming alcoholic.

Yes, he was, although unfortunately the movie itself was rubbish.

  • Confused 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote

It is a little-known fact that actually Warren Zevon did not die, but turned into a werewolf (of London.)

--MissWonderleyIII

Maybe his 'RIP' thread needs to be edited by the OP then, its probably in 'General Discussions' and therefore EASY TO FIND

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 2/8/2019 at 5:20 PM, Sgt_Markoff said:

the Penguin editions of classic Graham Greene novels ('Ministry of Fear', 'This Gun for Hire', etc) are the best I've seen in ages. I love that Gestalt style.

133399.jpg213667.jpg213653.jpg157307.jpg

Wow, Sergeant ! Those covers all look pretty film noirish !  hahahahahahaha.....

  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 2/9/2019 at 12:24 PM, LiamCasey said:

At the risk of disappointing you, Sarge, my reading of Charlotte's Web was not the first step on such a worthwhile literary endeavor. I will be taken part in a local production of a play based upon that novel and thought it best to revisit the original source material prior to the start of rehearsals.

Liam  - - and those fans of James Thurber who've posted about him here - - you'll be interested to know (although you may know this already) that in point of fact James Thurber wrote a  number of children's books. My favourite is "Many Moons", a delightful story about a child who - what else? - longs for the moon.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

3 hours ago, Vautrin the Iron Fist in the Iron Glove opined:

Quote

The Beatles do have the most number one records on the Billboard Hot 100 chart.

I thought this achievement had suffered shipwreck in the age of digital; something about how the record companies are now saying that every time a song is downloaded it counts as an album sale or some underhanded nonsense like that

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I second the remarks of fair MissWonderleyIII. LiamCasey, kudos on your stage career. Thank you for keeping tradition alive. Question: do you do your own blocking or does your director provide his blocking for you to follow?

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
19 minutes ago, Sgt_Markoff said:

Indeed. St Exupery's Little Prince for example

Hmm. Well, it's nice of you to get into the spirit of the "children's books are worth reading by adults" idea here, I appreciate your kind intent, Sarge. However - - at the risk of offending you and maybe many others here, I do not regard "The Little Prince" as a children's book. It's one of those books that masquarades as a children's book but in fact holds a lot more appeal for adults,and was really written for adults, Antoine de St. Exupery's insistence that it was written for a little boy he knew notwithstanding.

There's a certain genre of literature that does this - maybe I should call it "pseudo children's lit" ?  The authors of these books think that, by writing in a relatively simple style and especially by accompanying the text with illustrations, they can fob these literary works off as "children's lit". 

But in fact these pseudo- children's books are more like bite-size spiritual or philosophical works. Kind of like spooning sugar over medicine (hey reference to another children's story) to make the "serious" message they want to make more palatable.

I suppose by now you've deduced that I don't like "The Little Prince", and you'd be right.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

"I'm shocked! Shocked to discover gambling going on in this nightclub!"

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 2/8/2019 at 1:00 PM, GordonCole said:

Did Eden mention anything in it about her time on the film, The 7 Faces of Dr. Lao? Just curious since it was on recently and had such enchanting and magical visuals and special effects.

She really just glazed over it- one of her first big "breaks". I gave Dr Lao another view just to see her in it. Eden seems to play the same sweet girl in all her roles, although she claims to have first focused on becoming a singer.

She commented on how much she liked Tony Randall-he was unusually intelligent, professional and (therefore) very talented and a really fun person to hang out with on set. She mentions poker games where Randall situated himself to see opponents hands in a perfectly positioned mirror on set! Not so much for monetary gain but just in good natured fun, like a practical joke. He was that kind of guy.

And Miss W- I wholeheartedly agree with you about "adult/children" books. Aren't the best movies & cartoons like that? I'm thinking along the lines of Looney Tunes, Bullwinkle & early Disney like Fantasia?

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 2/11/2019 at 8:40 PM, Sgt_Markoff said:

I second the remarks of fair MissWonderleyIII. LiamCasey, kudos on your stage career. Thank you for keeping tradition alive. Question: do you do your own blocking or does your director provide his blocking for you to follow?

"Stage career"? 🤣 That would imply that I'm an actor! Trust me, when it comes to being on stage, I am, at best, a dilettante. But I enjoy being a small part of the creative process. And, in answer to your question, since I don't consider myself an actor, I do my best to do what the director tells me to do.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Even acting in a small role in a small play in some little town somewhere, takes courage. You're braver than I am!

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 'Laboratory Life: The Construction of Scientific Facts'. (Latour specializes in the theme of modernity. This title is said to be even better than the iconic work of Thomas Kuhn goes, as far as studying 'the sociology of scientists'.)
  • 'The Antonio Gramsci Reader' (Selected Writings 1916 - 1935). Excited to finally get around to this one...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm finishing up a detour reading musician Joe Jackson's autobiography because it needs to be returned to the lie-berry. Then I'm going to dig into Flamini's Irving Thalberg book-given to my Mother that she's never read!

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have now completed the first three volumes of Brooke McEldowney's collected works: Out Whom Shall We Gross?, Sonata for Piano and Armpit and The Day My Puberty Detonated. I had hoped to start his: The Bösendorfer Heard Round the World which is a stand-alone story but our copy seems to be misplaced. I do hope I do not have to replace it. The people at the publishing house are quite wonderful but I do hate to bother them with small orders.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, TikiSoo said:

I'm finishing up a detour reading musician Joe Jackson's autobiography because it needs to be returned to the lie-berry. Then I'm going to dig into Flamini's Irving Thalberg book-given to my Mother that she's never read!

One of my favorite singer/songwriters! How was it?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 3/5/2019 at 5:59 PM, LiamCasey said:

One of my favorite singer/songwriters! How was it?

Not surprisingly, very self indulgent.

I have liked Jackson since Look Sharp! through all his various incarnations and always discounted Elvis Costello as a Joe Jackson wannabe imitator.

Although Jackson's writing in this is often stilted and poorly structured, it's a very interesting glimpse of a misfit artist kid growing up in England. If familiar with his work, you recognize his classical education and the book just fleshes out everything up to the point of that first album release. 

It's interesting to see the ambitious drive & common struggle most artists have finding their way-especially during those early days of the innovative punk scene. It's also pretty fun to hear the performer's perspective like audience responses, hearing yourself on the radio & his work in general.

Jackson: "Lots of people love (the album) Look Sharp!, most like it a much more than I do." (I have tickets to see him perform at my neighborhood movie theater in May-an intimate setting!)

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

He was pioneering. "Look Sharp!" is a phenomenal song from any angle. I routinely play it whenever I'm in front of a jukebox and it usually blows the roof off. Production values on his albums were tight; and there's sure no one today who does clear, bouncy, high-energy tunes like that with lucid lyrics. In a big crowd of people, you will not see anyone who won't tap their fingers to it. Not every tune of his has that power but this track definitely does. I've had people come up to me and ask who the artist is; (and if they already know who he is then they consult with my doctor and put my next intravenous on their bill).

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Decisions, decisions.

I'm wondering if I really want to take a chance and acquire the book Sir Michael Caine has written on movie-making. 'Acting in Film' its called, something like that. Its supposed to be good. But is it?

I generally hate reading anything written by actors. Especially actors I have viewed at length, and admired for any amount of time.  I suppose I'm so critical towards the written word, so scrupulous towards speech--that I worry they might blurt out something in print which makes me think less of them; or make me re-evaluate my more 'visceral' esteem for them. I dislike that kind of conflict. I trust my gut and my feeling about a person first.

  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just for the record, Costello released two albums before Jackson's first.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

New Members:

Register Here

Learn more about the new message boards:

FAQ

Having problems?

Contact Us