GordonCole

What are you reading

93 posts in this topic

12 minutes ago, Vautrin said:

Just for the record, Costello released two albums before Jackson's first.

Very true. But, in my case, whenever any mentions “Elvis Costello”, the first thought that comes to my mind is “Diana Krall” which takes me down a completely different path of musical musings.

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1 hour ago, LiamCasey said:

Very true. But, in my case, whenever any mentions “Elvis Costello”, the first thought that comes to my mind is “Diana Krall” which takes me down a completely different path of musical musings.

Or even a path of non-musical musings. Is she really married to him? :)

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1 minute ago, Vautrin said:

Or even a path of non-musical musings. Is she really married to him? :)

“Is she really going out with him? Is she really gonna take him home tonight? ...” 😉

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There are many decent audiobooks available on YouTube. I am currently making my way through this one. Decent translation but the pic used in the video isn't actually Stirner but rather some random guy. There are no pictures of Stirner.

 

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I'm reading that book by Jerry Lewis about his relationship with Dean Martin called "Dean and Me: A Love Story" and Jerry's true affection for Dean Martin really comes out in this very unusual book. It's like Jerry saw Dean as an older brother who would help him grown into maturity himself and is a great read.

I'm also reading "The Secret Confession of Jack the Ripper" [debatable?] and a book on the history of the Voynich Manuscript.

 

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Just finished The Gentle Axe a novel involving a murder being investigated by Porfiry Petrovich, the detective in Crime and Punishment. A good read.

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Kudos on Voynich. Now that is some serious bidness. What's that obscure little backstory...something about how the translator was the 2nd husband of a 1rst wife of a classical composer who did the score for...some movie based on it...?

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4 hours ago, Sgt_Markoff said:

Kudos on Voynich. Now that is some serious bidness. What's that obscure little backstory...something about how the translator was the 2nd husband of a 1rst wife of a classical composer who did the score for...some movie based on it...?

Frankly I'm not far enough in reading to answer your questions, Sarge.

I will say, from what I'm reading this is way more difficult to decipher than Colonna's "Hypnerotomachia Poliphili" since maybe it is untranslatable. At least Colonna had some fun mixing up languages when he invented words, which could be solved with some intense study.

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TCM Fans:  I currently am reading the Alan K. Rode book "Michael Curtiz, A Life in Films".  It is a compulsive read and expands my horizon of Warner Brothers, Hal Wallis and the wide supporting staff that made Warner Brothers such a success in the 1930's-1950's. 

There is no way to deny Michael Curtiz his reputation as a fantastic and truly talented director.  I especially appreciated the early introduction to his work in Hungary and Austria.  It truly makes me want to sit down and "binge watch" Michael Curtiz's movies starting with Warners' silents that are still available to see and move through his career in a linear approach.

The author has provided depth to what we believe we know about Mr. Curtiz and separates facts from fiction and provided a very detailed account of how the movies were planned, produced, sets constructed and famous shots I remember were established.  So for all of you who are James Cagney, Errol Flynn, Bette Davis, Olivia de Haviland fans as well as fans of the large contingent of supporting actors I encourage you to read this book.  It is long, at 553 pages,but is so thoroughly researched and supported by access to film archives as well as personal information from Curtiz's stepson, John Meredyth Lucas including snaps from the family's personal collection.

Additionally it has a great filmography section that chronicles the films by dates so in as much as TCM owns much of the Warners' films I would like to lobby for a Michael Curtiz month with the author as the guest presenter.  Now that would keep me glued to my tuchas.

Good reading and good classic film watching

Emily

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On 3/13/2019 at 5:27 PM, CaveGirl said:

 

I'm reading that book by Jerry Lewis about his relationship with Dean Martin called "Dean and Me: A Love Story"

 

I read this last year and really enjoyed it.

I was prompted by Peter Bogdanovich's compilation of conversations with actors- WHO THE HELL'S IN IT? featuring Jerry Lewis in the largest segment. That's a great book, not too in depth but easy to read great little personal anecdotes of great stars he had met.

I'm currently reading MADCAP! the life of Preston Sturges. Sturges was one of the first graves I had ever visited. I am very familiar with his films, but had NO IDEA his life was so eccentric & colorful. And I'm still in his teen-20's years! (wish the writing was more engaging, though)

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On 3/23/2019 at 7:22 AM, TikiSoo said:

I read this last year and really enjoyed it.

I was prompted by Peter Bogdanovich's compilation of conversations with actors- WHO THE HELL'S IN IT? featuring Jerry Lewis in the largest segment. That's a great book, not too in depth but easy to read great little personal anecdotes of great stars he had met.

I'm currently reading MADCAP! the life of Preston Sturges. Sturges was one of the first graves I had ever visited. I am very familiar with his films, but had NO IDEA his life was so eccentric & colorful. And I'm still in his teen-20's years! (wish the writing was more engaging, though)

Thanks, Tiki!

I would love to read a book on Sturges since he's a favorite of mine. So glad you mentioned this volume so I can look for it.

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18 hours ago, CaveGirl said:

I would love to read a book on Sturges since he's a favorite of mine. So glad you mentioned this volume so I can look for it.

Quarter of the way through and it's officially a stinker. I find myself skimming over paragraphs and even pages looking for anything worth reading.

It's a terribly written book, in my opinion, most of the interesting stuff is more succinctly covered on Wiki. Just because there's more written in this book, doesn't mean it's fleshed out. Donald Spoto is the author-BOO!

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My reading since finishing Charlotte's Web:

High Stakes edited by George R. R. Martin & Melinda M. Snodgrass: The 23rd book in the Wild Cards series of anthologies and novels which forms another shared universe featuring superheroes, etc. (Why should Marvel and DC have all the fun?) which has being going on and off since 1987 (and I've been there since the beginning). Considering the buzzwords above, no one should be surprised to learn that Hollywood has an active interest in this series.

The Mammy by Brendan O'Carroll: Basically a series of stories (primarily humorous) about a late-1960s Dublin woman with seven children in her first year of widowhood. The basis for Anjelica Huston's Agnes Browne (1999).

Bing Crosby: A Pocketful of Dreams - The Early Years, 1903-1940 by Gary Giddins: Currently rereading this one before I tackle the sequel. When it is 17 years between books, it's probably for the best that I don't rely on my memory.

I assume this list qualifies for the word "eclectic"?

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I'm cranking on books dis season. Chomp chomp chomp. This thread actually helps keep me focused and on-target.

  • Jean-Paul Sarte -  What is Subjectivity?
  • Eric Foner -  Reconstruction: America's Unfinished Revolution 1863 - 1877
  • The Antonio Gramsci Reader: Writings 1916-1935
  • Bruno Latour -  Laboratory Life: The Construction of Scientific Facts

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On 3/26/2019 at 7:41 AM, TikiSoo said:

Quarter of the way through and it's officially a stinker. I find myself skimming over paragraphs and even pages looking for anything worth reading.

It's a terribly written book, in my opinion, most of the interesting stuff is more succinctly covered on Wiki. Just because there's more written in this book, doesn't mean it's fleshed out. Donald Spoto is the author-BOO!

Oh, okay...so maybe I should save my money and just look for a library edition, Tiki?

Thanks for the further review.

Spoto, eh? That name rings a bell. Didn't he write that Hitchcock book from way back which was rather controversial? I had not looked up the Sturges book online after you mentioned it, so didn't realize he was the author. Thanks again for the latest on the Sturges book!

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On 3/26/2019 at 9:05 PM, Sgt_Markoff said:

I'm cranking on books dis season. Chomp chomp chomp. This thread actually helps keep me focused and on-target.

  • Jean-Paul Sarte -  What is Subjectivity?
  • Eric Foner -  Reconstruction: America's Unfinished Revolution 1863 - 1877
  • The Antonio Gramsci Reader: Writings 1916-1935
  • Bruno Latour -  Laboratory Life: The Construction of Scientific Facts

Sounds like fun.

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