GordonCole

What are you reading

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Thanx for asking. I am currently reading Patricia Highsmith's book, The Talented Mr. Ripley since I try to never read anything currently on the Best Seller list.

So far, it is marvelous and goes into the background of Ripley a lot more than the films do, which is mind expanding.
 

Though I actually think the 1999 version with Damon and Law is quite good, I am way more partial to the 1960 version directed by noted French artist, Rene Clement, called Purple Noon. I will say the only thing missing from that version is the great work done by Philip Seymour Hoffman in the later one, being just a total nasty piece of work as he puts Ripley in his place continually.
 

The French version has the heartthrob for Parisian ladies, Alain Delon in the Ripley type role and he is quite good. 

Patricia Highsmith was an excellent writer of suspense and she is missed.

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The Necronomicon

I've read it many times before, naturally, but this time I'm trying in the original Enochian, as the fragmentary texts that Alhazred based his Arabic-language first volume on were found written in dully glowing Enochian script said to have been inked with the blood of the nephilim, etched into parchment made from demon's wing, and based on first-hand accounts from before the Dawning of the present Reality. I'm especially interested in any new insights into the Great Sundering as promised by the Nightmare Lamentations of Yog-Sothoth.

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7 minutes ago, LawrenceA said:

The Necronomicon

I've read it many times before, naturally, but this time I'm trying in the original Enochian, as the fragmentary texts that Alhazred based his Arabic-language first volume on were found written in dully glowing Enochian script said to have been inked with the blood of the nephilim, etched into parchment made from demon's wing, and based on first-hand accounts from before the Dawning of the present Reality. I'm especially interested in any new insights into the Great Sundering as promised by the Nightmare Lamentations of Yog-Sothoth.

Really? I've been looking for that dang thing since I got a bedtime visit from a ghostly Howard, asking me to update his link at Miskatonic U's website. Now I've heard I think of the Nephilim but only on that Ancient Aliens show on the History Channel so you have me at a loss. Tell Yog to say hi to Yogi-Sothoth and when he gets to the fork in the road to perdition to take it.

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Currently finishing Voltaire's political writings (mostly about the reign of Louis XIV, admittedly--well at least in the anthology I'm perusing) and his ethical discourses.

Roland Barthes's 'Mythologies', from the semiotician phase of his career. One of the few post-structuralists I can abide. Despise others of his ilk.

'Strike the Baby and Kill the Blonde'. Dave Knox's primer on west coast production slang. Refer to it frequently.

'Man's Fate', (famous novel of the Chinese civil war) by Andre Malraux.

'The Killing Anniversary', mass market paperback, multi-generational family saga--not my usual fare, but I needed to get more familiar with the history of the IRA.

On order: a Harlequin romance set in west Texas (further research) and David Mamet's 'Three Uses of the Knife'.

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3 hours ago, Sgt_Markoff said:

...'The Killing Anniversary', mass market paperback, multi-generational family saga--not my usual fare, but I needed to get more familiar with the history of the IRA.

Well Sarge, that all kind'a started when they started killin' off pension funds, as far as I could ever tell.

(...but don't take my word for it here...you're probably better off readin' that book anyway)

;)

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I recall being slightly disappointed when signs advertising IRAs began to pop up outside

banks. My favorite freedom fighters being "turned" into a retirement plan. But I've gotten

over it. :)

 

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I just picked up JEANNIE OUT OF THE BOTTLE by Barbara Eden at a library book sale. Every book in my queue was read so I'm venturing into TV more than my typical movie biographies. It's still the beginning, but her experiences as a young lady trying to "break into the movies" seem pretty universal.

The last one read was an old Ken Murray written fun book on San Simeon.

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Just finished Turn on the Heat (1940) by Erle Stanley Gardner.  One of his Cool and Lam detective series.  Much more entertaining than his Perry Mason books, but then for me that is probably because I prefer the Raymond Burr TV series.

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Charlotte’s Web by E. B. White. Obviously my current reading is not as esoteric as LawrenceA’s!

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On 2/5/2019 at 1:48 PM, GordonCole said:

What Are You Reading

Right now - The Goldfinch by Donna Tartt

I think it may be the most tremendously descriptive novel I've ever read. 

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There's three books I've taken to reading annually...

KEN KESEY'S "SOMETIMES A GREAT NOTION( since '67)

"KINFLICKS" by LISA ALTHER(since '77)

"WINTERDANCE" by GARY PAULSEN (since'95) subtitled: "The Madness Of Running The Iditarod".

Just finished the 3rd a few days ago.  ;)

Sepiatone

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Well, I've reading between the lines so much lately that frankly I was starting to get a little paranoid about things.

But after consulting with my doctor, he said that that was quite normal for those who do this, and then handed me a prescription for Xanax.

(...and then once I got that prescription filled, I tried to read that really small print on the back of the bottle)

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some time hence, Liam OCasey muttered:

Quote

Charlotte’s Web by E. B. White. Obviously my current reading is not as esoteric as LawrenceA’s!

Not so. I certainly respect your selection. E.B. White is a hallowed man of American letters. He's famous for more than just a children's book. If you're a fan of him at all, pick up his essays and nonfiction works. He's like a James Thurber, or an A.E. Milne. Possessing of a wide-raging mind with interests in many topics.

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Okay, to a little more seriously answer this question, I recently read Whose Boat is This Boat.

A wonderful story carrying the message of how people should be more empathetic towards the plight of others.

It was a quick read, and with the ADDED bonus that I didn't even have to don my reading glasses to enjoy it.

(...the print was WAY bigger than what was on back of the aforementioned Xanax bottle)

 

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This thread prods me to clear out my bookcase this morning and make room for new titles. What to do, what to do. I haven't got any replacements clearly identified yet, to supply in their stead. It can be a labor to pore through my TBR lists and evaluate what title should come next; as well as check prices and availability (I always buy used).

Size matters too! New books must be able to fit my trouser's cargo pocket without at the same time, being of too fine a font to absorb by the light of the Tiffany lamps and neon signs I often find myself reading below, (Scottish IVs and special Milwaukee-made defibrillators at hand).

Also I must find some venue to remove these used spines thither, for others to enjoy; which can turn out to be quite a task in itself. I don't allow any of my old books to be callously tossed onto the kerb! :D

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22 hours ago, Sgt_Markoff said:

some time hence, Liam OCasey muttered:

Not so. I certainly respect your selection. E.B. White is a hallowed man of American letters. He's famous for more than just a children's book. If you're a fan of him at all, pick up his essays and nonfiction works. He's like a James Thurber, or an A.E. Milne. Possessing of a wide-raging mind with interests in many topics.

Everytime I read Thurber, the walls of my house start to resemble a portrait of his wife. Of course my house is in Margaritaville where I lost my chakra and haven't recovered it yet, so that might explain things.

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Like this? The Thurber Carnival is on my short-list of books that actually provoke visceral, rib-quivering, belly-laughs

house-and-woman-james-thurber.jpg

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5 minutes ago, Sgt_Markoff said:

Like this? The Thurber Carnival is on my short-list of books that actually provoke visceral, rib-quivering, belly-laughs

house-and-woman-james-thurber.jpg

Yeah, she always has that peevish look on her face when I start to read Thurber and then I fall out of bed.

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On 2/6/2019 at 6:06 AM, TikiSoo said:

I just picked up JEANNIE OUT OF THE BOTTLE by Barbara Eden at a library book sale. Every book in my queue was read so I'm venturing into TV more than my typical movie biographies. It's still the beginning, but her experiences as a young lady trying to "break into the movies" seem pretty universal.

The last one read was an old Ken Murray written fun book on San Simeon.

Did Eden mention anything in it about her time on the film, The 7 Faces of Dr. Lao? Just curious since it was on recently and had such enchanting and magical visuals and special effects.

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I'm considering: "Doo-dah!: Stephen Foster And The Rise Of American Popular Culture" by Ken Easton

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On 2/6/2019 at 7:23 PM, LiamCasey said:

Charlotte’s Web by E. B. White. Obviously my current reading is not as esoteric as LawrenceA’s!

Mine either. I've been trying to finish the book, Godel, Escher, Bach: An Eternal Golden Braid, for the last twenty years. Not the book's fault; I need the Cliff Notes version maybe.

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