Stephan55

THE GET SMART THREAD

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Learned an interesting tidbit while watching a TV program about the July 1944

plot to assassinate Hitler. The planners were pretty meticulous, so much so that

they tested a number of explosives from different countries to see which would

be the most effective. They finally settled on ones made in Britain. Unfortunately,

due to a number of last minute, unforeseen changes, the plot failed.

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Yeah it's pretty unusual to see a German-planned plot carried out by Germans, wind up with no result. Usually they nail it. They should have put that guy...who was it, Hans....no, Otto Skorzeny to carry it out.

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49 minutes ago, Sgt_Markoff said:

Yeah it's pretty unusual to see a German-planned plot carried out by Germans, wind up with no result. Usually they nail it. They should have put that guy...who was it, Hans....no, Otto Skorzeny to carry it out.

I think it was Von Stauffenberg who was about to detonate his bomb when Hitler left the building he was in. Minutes away from killing him.

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The 'Blizzard of 1888', as viewed from somewhere in Brooklyn. What I don't grasp is why there are so many telephone wires, if Alexander Graham Bell only received a patent for his telephone in 1876? This city street resembles current-day Latin American slum.

And by the way, how uncanny is it that someone named 'Bell' invented the telephone in the first place?

It was not the only invention he had a hand in. The metal detector is another. With regard to the telephone, he 'considered it an intrusion on his real work and refused to have one in his study'.

Blizzard_1888_01.jpg

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America's little-known 'Beaver Wars'

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Beaver_Wars

Champlain's_1609_battle_with_the_Iroquoi

This isn't a post where I'm taking a stance favorable to colonialism here. Just airing little-known factoids about the 1600s in North America, where the Native American tribes of our eastern seaboard had their hands full with vicious internecine "tribe vs tribe" conquests, even before the unhappy event of European settlement and ensuing misery of colonization.

The Iroquois Empire, are generally agreed to have been a ferociously aggressive force during this period; pursuing an 'expansionist' political and commercial policy; and routinely in the habit of exterminating or enslaving enemy tribes.

I'm not an expert on this topic by any means, so feel free to add your own corrections to what I've just offered. You won't be hurting my feelings!

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3 minutes ago, Sgt_Markoff said:

America's little-known 'Beaver Wars'

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Beaver_Wars

Champlain's_1609_battle_with_the_Iroquoi

This isn't a post where I'm taking a stance favorable to colonialism here. Just airing little-known factoids about the 1600s in North America, where the Native American tribes of our eastern seaboard had their hands full with vicious internecine "tribe vs tribe" conquests, even before the unhappy event of European settlement and ensuing misery of colonization.

The Iroquois Empire, are generally agreed to have been a ferociously aggressive force during this period; pursuing an 'expansionist' political and commercial policy; and routinely in the habit of exterminating or enslaving enemy tribes.

I'm not an expert on this topic by any means, so feel free to add your own corrections to what I've just offered. You won't be hurting my feelings!

Native American history was not taught when I was in school. I'm sure whatever you present will be of interest to many on this website.

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8 hours ago, Sgt_Markoff said:

Yeah it's pretty unusual to see a German-planned plot carried out by Germans, wind up with no result. Usually they nail it. They should have put that guy...who was it, Hans....no, Otto Skorzeny to carry it out.

There were a number of unforeseen changes that led to the failure of this typically

well ordered German plot. The meeting was changed from a concrete bunker type

building to a wooden one which lessened the impact of the bomb. Von Stauffenberg

only had time to rig one explosive instead of the two that were in the briefcase. After

he left the room someone moved the briefcase to the other side of the table leg away

from Hitler. Depending on your viewpoint, an im/perfect storm. It would have been a

lot easier just to shoot Adolph and take your lumps.

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Intrepid Briton, Colonel Percy Fawcett, leader of the infamous 'Fawcett Expedition' which set off in 1925 to find a lost civilization in the South American jungle. The foolhardy explorers vanished without a trace; and resulted in probably the most sensational and talked-about world news story of the 1920s.

PercyFawcett.jpg

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Percy_Fawcett

I personally think the influence and impact of this story is larger than we realize today. It's probably at the root of many adventure tropes of the century all the way up through Indiana Jones.

The yarn doesn't end there. In 1932 a follow-up expedition embarked from the UK to ascertain what fate had befallen the ill-starred Fawcett mission. They tried to trace the exact route. The account of this spectacularly unsuccessful rescue attempt was narrated by journalist Peter Fleming, older brother of Ian Fleming; and is in itself a sprawling adventure saga. The party broke into two squabbling groups, and they raced each other back to the coast in order to be the first to appoint the blame to the other for the trip's failure.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Peter_Fleming_(writer)

320px-Rio_araguaia.jpg

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24 minutes ago, Gershwin fan said:

 

My ancestors had those helmets.   They served a dual purpose as a wok. 

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47 minutes ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

My ancestors had those helmets.   They served a dual purpose as a wok. 

Mine wore a Tatar helmet like this. Good for horse riding. :lol: 

ae99c2d5e6f57aba8a9073df68093269.jpg

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https://thephilosophicalsalon.com/they-are-both-worse/

DEBATES
 

THEY ARE BOTH WORSE!

Back in the late 1920s, Stalin was asked by a journalist which deviation is worse, the Rightist one (Bukharin&company) or the Leftist one (Trotsky&company), and he snapped back: “They are both worse!” It is a sad sign of our predicament that, when we are confronted with a political choice and obligated to take a side, even if it is only a less bad one, quite often the reply that imposes itself is: “But they are both worse!” This, of course, does not mean that both poles of the alternative simply amount to the same. In concrete situations, we should, for example, conditionally support the protests of the Yellow Vests in France or make a tactical pact with liberals to block fundamentalist threats to our freedoms (say, when fundamentalists want to limit abortion rights or pursue an openly racist politics). But what it does mean is that most of the choices imposed on us by the big media are false choices – their function is to obfuscate a true choice. The sad lesson to be drawn from this is: if one side in a conflict is bad, the opposite side is not necessarily good.

Let’s take today’s situation in Venezuela: Maduro or Guaido? They are both worse, although not in the same sense. Maduro is “worse” because his reign brought Venezuela to a complete economic fiasco with a majority of the population living in abject poverty, a fiasco which cannot be attributed only to the sabotage of internal and external enemies. It is enough to bear in mind the indelible damage that the Maduro regime did to the idea of Socialism: for decades to come, we will have to listen to variations on the theme “You want Socialism? Look at Venezuela…”. However, Guaido is no less “worse”: when he assumed his virtual presidency, we were without a doubt witnessing a well-prepared coup orchestrated by the United States, not an autonomous popular insurgency (which is precisely the “better” third term missing in the alternative of Maduro and Guaido, who are “both worse”).           

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Colonel Alfred Redl, famous spy-chief of the Austro-Hungarian empire under the Hapsburgs. One of the earliest innovators of modern espionage techniques. Even though pre-WWI he coined several basic concepts like keeping 'private dossiers' and covert cameras. Astoundingly, he himself was a double-agent and probably sold out his own country. He was eventually caught out by the very techniques he introduced!

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alfred_Redl

Redl_Alfred.jpg

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