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Paul Newman as SOTM May 2019

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SOMEBODY UP THERE LIKES ME

May 1

  • SOMEBODY UP THERE LIKES ME ('56)
  • THE RACK ('56)
  • UNTIL THEY SAIL ('57)
  • THE HELEN MORGAN STORY ('57)
  • THE SILVER CHALICE ('54)

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CAT ON A HOT TIN ROOF ('58)

May 8

  • THE YOUNG PHILADELPHIANS ('59)
  • THE LONG HOT SUMMER ('58)
  • CAT ON A HOT TIN ROOF ('58)
  • SWEET BIRD OF YOUTH ('62)

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HUD

May 15

  • HUD ('63)
  • BUTCH CASSIDY AND THE SUNDANCE KID ('69)
  • THE LIFE AND TIMES OF JUDGE ROY BEAN ('72)
  • THE OUTRAGE ('64)
  • THE LEFT-HANDED GUN ('58)

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COOL HAND LUKE

May 22

  • COOL HAND LUKE ('67)
  • HARPER ('66)
  • PARIS BLUES ('61)
  • THE PRIZE ('63)
  • LADY L ('65)

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THE VERDICT

May 29

  • THE STING ('73)
  • THE VERDICT ('82)
  • THE MACKINTOSH MAN ('73)
  • SLAP SHOT ('77)
  • THE DROWNING POOL ('75)

 

 

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Some really good titles. Glad he's getting five nights. This is one of TCM's better choices in my opinion.

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36 minutes ago, Brrrcold said:

I'm glad for this. But... THE HUSTLER? I mean...

I think they aired THE HUSTLER once as an Essential. I'm sure it will turn up again.

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On 2/15/2019 at 2:51 PM, TopBilled said:

Some really good titles. Glad he's getting five nights. This is one of TCM's better choices in my opinion.

TopBilled, I agree with you. I'm a fan of Paul Newman, and there are some great Newman films on this list I haven't seen yet. I can't wait!

This Newman tribute can be our fix until then:

 

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Unfortunately, I've seen them all. It's a shame that one or more of the few that I haven't couldn't have been among the ones chosen. 

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Every actor probably has at least one film which tends to get "lost" and it seems as though Newman's may be A New Kind of Love (1963). I don't know that I'd want to eliminate any that are being shown to make room for it (except maybe The Silver Chalice), but I do have a soft spot for this admittedly silly film. It was a fairly blatant attempt on the part of Paramount to do a Doris Day/Rock Hudson comedy, even including Thelma Ritter in a supporting role. Newman wasn't really adept at the kind of swingin' ring-a-ding (read Sinatra) comedy required here and actually came off as more smarmy than sophisticated at times, but it's still fun. He costarred with Joanne, who seems to have had the real funny bone in the family, and they seem to be enjoying the experience. The only collaboration of husband and wife being shown is The Long Hot Summer, which is a good one, but it would have been nice to see another on the list. (From the Terrace is a really good, though soapy, melodrama.)

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6 minutes ago, DougieB said:

Every actor probably has at least one film which tends to get "lost" and it seems as though Newman's may be A New Kind of Love (1963). I don't know that I'd want to eliminate any that are being shown to make room for it (except maybe The Silver Chalice), but I do have a soft spot for this admittedly silly film. It was a fairly blatant attempt on the part of Paramount to do a Doris Day/Rock Hudson comedy, even including Thelma Ritter in a supporting role. Newman wasn't really adept at the kind of swingin' ring-a-ding (read Sinatra) comedy required here and actually came off as more smarmy than sophisticated at times, but it's still fun. He costarred with Joanne, who seems to have had the real funny bone in the family, and they seem to be enjoying the experience. The only collaboration of husband and wife being shown is The Long Hot Summer, which is a good one, but it would have been nice to see another on the list. (From the Terrace is a really good, though soapy, melodrama.)

Yes, it would have been nice if one of the evenings had been devoted solely to Newman-Woodward pairings, including the ones he directed that starred her. Maybe if/when Woodward becomes Star of the Month, we'll see more of those films.

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'A New Kind of Love' does indeed have a quiet but loyal reputation among devotees. Glad to see it mentioned here. The first Paul Newman film I might have ever saw--or at least, the first film of his I ever saw when he was still 'on the rise', not-a-big-name-yet, when he was still being occasionally mis-cast and making occasional duds or sleepers--was ...The Helen Morgan Story? Do I recall the title correct? Co-starring someone like Anne Blythe? Was that the flick where he plays her agent and he is an utter churl? He was great in that role, playing a real ****!

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25 minutes ago, Sgt_Markoff said:

'A New Kind of Love' does indeed have a quiet but loyal reputation among devotees. Glad to see it mentioned here. The first Paul Newman film I might have ever saw--or at least, the first film of his I ever saw when he was still 'on the rise', not-a-big-name-yet, when he was still being occasionally mis-cast and making occasional duds or sleepers--was ...The Helen Morgan Story? Do I recall the title correct? Co-starring someone like Anne Blythe? Was that the flick where he plays her agent and he is an utter churl? He was great in that role, playing a real ****!

Yes, it was THE HELEN MORGAN STORY with Ann Blythe. It turned out to be Blyth's last motion picture, though she would continue to act on television.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Helen_Morgan_Story

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Love Paul, but another repeat SOTM. Sigh.

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2 minutes ago, Hibi said:

Love Paul, but another repeat SOTM. Sigh.

Would you rather have someone "new" who made lousy films, instead of a "repeat" who made great films?

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YES!!! (When one has seen the great films over and over)

Why is Nobody's Fool ever shown? Sometime's A Great Notion?

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First news of slight changes to the TCM formula after the AT&T take-over: July's SOTM will be Steven Seagal.

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18 minutes ago, Sgt_Markoff said:

But are those the only choices?

Most of the time 'those' are the only two choices;   every once in a while the SOTM is a Fox or Universal star and TCM goes out of their way to lease films from those studios (since they are NOT in the old so called Turner library of films).

 

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I think it's a bit unfair to complain every time a repeat Star of the Month is chosen. I know, I know, I'm a hypocrite because I used to do it. 

But I realized that having repeat stars sometimes means TCM will air a premiere to give fans something "new." Plus these repeat stars have strong filmographies and help introduce classics to people who haven't seen the films before.

Now yes, I do have an issue with them making Greta Garbo Star of the Month four times already. But that's because I'm not a Garbo fan...though I am fully aware there are a lot of Garbo fans who want to see her honored again. Good for them!

It's a balancing act. It's probably best if the Columbia, Fox, Universal and Paramount stars are honored in August during Summer Under the Stars since one day (as opposed to four evenings) requires less leasing of titles outside the library. 

TCM's business is classic film. And they have to keep in mind that they owe viewers the broadest most diverse film history possible, not just classics from only three major studios and a few poverty row studios.

The biggest concern I have is that when people first latch on to TCM and start becoming familiar with the catalogue of titles TCM plays from MGM, WB and RKO-- they don't realize that this is only about "half" of the classic studio output from the production code era. A lot of TCM viewers are ignorant about what the other major studios produced. TCM's skewed programming fosters that ignorance.

There are thousands of classic films TCM does not play. For example, Republic Pictures made over 900 feature films from 1935 to 1959. TCM has only played two of them so far this year. Then if we add in a thousand Paramount films and a thousand Universal films from the same period of time, we start to realize that TCM is not as inclusive as it could be.

But again, we have to balance it. If TCM suddenly started flooding the airwaves with films from Republic, Universal and Paramount-- then that means some of the MGM,WB and RKO stuff would be taken out of rotation. So how do they decide what is no longer shown, and what should be shown instead?

I'm not even really addressing the Monogram, Allied Artists, American International and UA stuff they have in the library.

The real problem is that TCM is not providing a full history of classics from the production code era. Their scheduling is limited...and financially they have to use the titles Ted Turner acquired in 1986 from MGM, WB and RKO.

I understand people saying they don't want repeats for the Star of the Month. But take into account TCM's library, its business model, and the fact there are actually too many classics to fit into all those broadcast hours. Then look at the fact the stars whose works are replayed more than other stars have been chosen as the torch bearers for classic film. It's the reality of TCM's business.

Typically they are focused on household names. Typically they are focused on stars from MGM, WB and RKO. 

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this is only about "half" of the classic studio output from the production code era.

Not to mention the untold numbers lost to nitrate stock combustion (and other vault fires unrelated to nitrate, such as losses in private collections).

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10 minutes ago, Sgt_Markoff said:

Not to mention the untold numbers lost to nitrate stock combustion (and other vault fires unrelated to nitrate, such as losses in private collections).

Right...so it's less than half.

The biggest error TCM is making is that they are assigning values on to films because of director, star, Oscar recognition. And that automatically gives the "A" films priority and shoves the B films off the screen. They have a lot of Monogram westerns and Monogram comedies in the Turner library they just neglect. So that part of Hollywood history is sidelined, and the careers of people who worked on those films have been marginalized.

A lot of films not airing could be airing. They've been preserved. But they are not important to the programmers or their pet themes.

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Indeed I too, share the sentiment of honoring all the talents who worked in cinema, highest to lowest---not just the most notable. Sending these forgotten legions our appreciation and highlighting the credit they deserve, is a noble thing.

On the other hoof, I can't imagine how B films could feasibly be used in a 'Star of the Month' scheduling choice. Might even jeopardize the station's ratings and viability at the root of its mission.

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1 minute ago, Sgt_Markoff said:

Indeed I too, share the sentiment of honoring all the talents who worked in cinema, highest to lowest---not just the most notable. Sending these forgotten legions our appreciation and highlighting the credit they deserve, is a noble thing.

On the other hoof, I can't imagine how B films could feasibly be used in a 'Star of the Month' scheduling choice. Might even jeopardize the station's ratings and viability at the root of its mission.

Two days out of 31 Days in August devoted to B film stars is hardly going to break them or impede their "mission." Technically it's part of their mission to foster awareness of the classics (in all forms).

They should also be bringing in more British, Canadian and Australian films-- especially titles from those English speaking countries that utilized Hollywood stars. Again they are not being as comprehensive as they could be.

The programmers like to act as if they're socially and politically conscious in their selections when the reality is they neglect so much.

But complaining about Paul Newman as Star of the Month is not going to solve the problem.

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I'm unfamiliar with SOTM airing patterns. In the Newman list above, I see 24 titles. What I meant was, if during the course of any random one month (out of twelve per year), new viewers tune in any night during that month of their first introduction to the station, and they find B-titles frequently playing in prime-time slots, then the station could lose them. They'd see the most scurrilous popular accusations against classic flicks, justified. And what I mean by 'mission' is that 'surviving' is always the #1 goal. AMC is an example of how a slide can occur.

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1 minute ago, Sgt_Markoff said:

I'm unfamiliar with SOTM airing patterns. In the Newman list above, I see 24 titles. What I meant was, if during the course of any random one month (out of twelve per year), new viewers tune in any night during that month of their first introduction to the station, and they find B movies frequently playing in prime-time slots, then the station could lose them. 

No, that won't happen. They won't lose them.

In June 2011 TCM did a group Star of the Month for singing cowboys. They presented it in summertime when people were home watching movies. And it was very popular. They brought in a lot of B westerns from Republic and Columbia that month. Viewers were eating it up like it was going out of style. Many of those titles have never re-aired on TCM. It was a special month of programming. In my (not so humble) opinion, they need more of it.

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In the past they've aired some of the early TV work of actors who were living in NYC during the 1950's, so TV performances aren't necessarily out of the question for programming. Newman did some, though I'm not sure of exactly how much. (I know Bang the Drum Slowly was one.) For repeat Stars of the Month, maybe it would be interesting to look at some of that, rather than stick to golden oldies. I also remember seeing on PBS sometime in the 1990's a filmed stage production of Our Town with Newman as the Stage Manager, directed by Joanne, which I believe was done at the Long Wharf Theater. I remember it being excellent.

Earlier I said The Long Hot Summer was the only Newman/Woodward collaboration on the schedule, but I now remember they did Rally Round the Flag, Boys together as well.

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6 minutes ago, DougieB said:

I also remember seeing on PBS sometime in the 1990's a filmed stage production of Our Town with Newman as the Stage Manager, directed by Joanne, which I believe was done at the Long Wharf Theater. I remember it being excellent.

That's one of the 5 Newman movies I haven't seen. The other 4 are:

  • The Secret War of Harry Frigg (1968)
  • Winning (1969)
  • WUSA (1970)
  • Quintet (1979)

I have a copy of Winning among my stuff to watch, and Quintet shows up on Amazon Prime occasionally. 

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