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GondolaNoUta

How To Get My Age Bracket (20-30) Into Cinema

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I felt the community of TCM would be the best resource to ask this question. I asked my best friend recently as to his favourite film, and he responded with “Guardians of the Galaxy”. (He gave me a movie and not a film as far as I’m concerned)

The feeling I believe we all share is that my generation or age bracket is missing out on appreciating films for the actors/actress who bring their roles to life and span a career of memorable performances for the audience to appreciate. Instead, young people are preferring fictional characters being brought to life and engaging in escapism rather than appreciating a film.

My question is how to get the majority of people my age to appreciate films the way I do, both classic and contemporary. The fact that box office records have recently been dominated by superhero movies means that it’s not working. Many in this industry have agreed on this issue, where cinema attendance is falling at the expense of at-home streaming services.

More importantly, how many members are in their 20s and do you have any suggestions. I feel this would help a lot of stressed-out, disillusioned young people by giving them something to appreciate and look forward to in the evening.

 

 

 

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Let your age compatriots in the theatres showing vintage films, in for free...but then charge them an arm and a leg to get out?

Also say they can use their phones while watching the films.

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I just turned 24. I have noticed from online discussions on other websites that I'm usually one who talks more about films from years ago than others in my age range, and I have noticed some of what i consider to be well-known films from as recently as the 80s or early 90s to be considered obscure. So its a bit of an uphill battle.

What I presume to be the best is to start with something in color that's well known maybe, something from the 50s, 60s, or 70s. Then maybe lure them back to older titles in black and white by showing them films with people they saw before in the later films. Also, rely on what your audiences likes (be it comedy, romance, musicals, or crime films) I wish you the best of luck.

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There is no way.   Make new friends.

OK,  I'm cracking wise here but I have found that this is the case.     E.g. Go to the TCM Film Festival and revival theaters and meet people there. 

Note that I'm also a jazz musician;   being into non-mainstream art-forms means seeking out non-mainstream venues to meet others with similar taste.   

Good luck.  

 

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Shame them into evolving. Make sure they know that some of today's limp pictures are outright remakes of much finer classic films (like the case of 'True Grit').

  • Make sure they understand that any film NOT EVEN ANNOUNCED OPENLY AS REMAKES but which contains a 'detective' or a 'bad girl' or 'gangland' is probably stealing something (maybe its entire plot) in an unacknowledged and maybe even an  underhanded manner from something already coined in the 1930s.

(This is all about being fair and giving credit where credit is due to the original innovators of what we see on screen.)

  • Assure them that they are 'not getting it' and 'not experiencing the real mccoy' when they only follow the duplicitous sham and con-game that is modern Hollywood.
  • Relate to them the facts of the amazing success of the movie-making model under the era of the Big Studios. It wasn't a struggling industry, it kicked down the door and took names. See here:

http://forums.tcm.com/topic/257164-hollywoods-conservativism/

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10 minutes ago, Sgt_Markoff said:

Make sure they know that some of today's limp pictures are outright remakes of much finer classic films (like the case of 'True Grit').

You really believe that the Wayne version of True Grit is a much finer film than the recently made version?

I don't think so at all.    There are so many areas where the new adaptation does a better job;  one clear one is the acting,  especially that of the young girl and Texas Ranger.    In the original the acting was weak (and to be fair to Campbell he wasn't even an actor, while the actress was too old for the part).     

While I agree that 99% of "remakes" are inferior to the original,   True Grit falls into that 1%.    

The new adaptation is much more faithful to the book then the Wayne film.    It clearly is an adaptation of the book while the Wayne film is just that;  A made for the Wayne persona,  film.   (note that many star driven films made during the 'golden age' suffered because they were built around the star,,,,,   e.g. that is why low-budget noir films are often superior,  because the producer and director didn't have to give a hoot about the star's image.

 

 

 

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Yeah its godawful. Every time I even think about what they did, I want to rinse out my brain. The whole idea of those two clowns even molesting a classic for a cheap cash grab--instead of just trotting out their own malarkey as they usually do--makes the bile roil around in my intestines. Beach-boy Jeff Bridges playing a cowboy? Come on now. Plus who else is in the film? That execrable twerp Matt Damon? gag

There's just no rule that I'm aware of which says any time a movie is 'more faithful' to the book, that this automatically makes the movie better.

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7 minutes ago, Sgt_Markoff said:

Its horrible. The whole idea of those two clowns even molesting a classic for a cheap cash grab--instead of just trotting out their own malarkey as they usually do--makes the bile roil around in my intestines. Beach-boy Jeff Bridges playing a cowboy? Come on now. Plus who else is in the film? That p.o.s. twerp Matt Damon? gag

Molesting a classic????    Wow,   I didn't have much respect for your opinion before this,  but I really have little to none now.    You site nothing that is a comparison between the two films only your obvious immature hate for some of the actors.

All I'll say is that it is the Wayne film that molested a classic;  that would be the BOOK by Charles Portis.

 

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Just let them enjoy whatever they want. I am in the same age range as you OP and I do not mind seeing films from any period. Some of the older films are really more of acquired taste and not everyone will enjoy them. Just seek out others who enjoy what you do too and discuss with them. Also I just have to say-

6 hours ago, GondolaNoUta said:

I asked my best friend recently as to his favourite film, and he responded with “Guardians of the Galaxy”. (He gave me a movie and not a film as far as I’m concerned)

Okay we get it, dude. You enjoy "serious cinema" like us. You don't have to try so hard. :rolleyes: 

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1 hour ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

There is no way.   Make new friends.

OK,  I'm cracking wise here but I have found that this is the case.     E.g. Go to the TCM Film Festival and revival theaters and meet people there. 

Note that I'm also a jazz musician;   being into non-mainstream art-forms means seeking out non-mainstream venues to meet others with similar taste.   

Good luck.  

 

I liked your answer/suggestion here, James.

However, I also thought while reading your Jazz analogy here how ironic and in a way a little sad it is that what was once in fact considered a "mainstream art form" such as studio era movies, now seems regulated to the niche market.

My only hope for the future being that as the younger set grows older and their tastes mature, they'll discover this big ol' world of classic cinema that used to be a "mainstream art form", and then at the same time also discover and begin to appreciate the high talent level that had to be involved in it in order to even produce it.

(...I at least know that as I've aged I've discovered myself starting to appreciate many more of the films that were made before I came into this world and that upon my first viewing of them as a younger person might've felt were "corny", but now days often tend to find myself appreciating the talent involved in them...Fred and Ginger movies being a prime example of this in my case, I'll now admit)

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I just turned 22. My parents showed me some classic movies when I was very young, and then I got back into it when I got back into theater. I have started off with showing some of my friends "Singin' in the Rain" (1952), and that seemed to pique their interest in classic film. I think you have to kind of pick things from particular genres for different people (bc they all have different tastes). 

I think sometimes younger people think old things are boring, when that's a generalized statement that isn't true. I also have shown something more "shocking" for the time period, like "The Bad Seed" (1956), which is about a child killer. My friend really liked it. I think a lot of it, is that younger people are simply not exposed to classic film. It's not very mainstream these days, whereas people my parents' age were most likely more exposed to it, because their parents were around during Hollywood's heyday. Just my opinion. 

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Okay GondolaNoUta, after some serious contemplation on my part about how you can possibly get your fellow young people to watch classic movies, I THINK I've got the answer for ya here.

Tell 'em there's a free video game in it for 'em if they'll only try givin' it a shot for once!

(...think I'm kiddin' HERE?...well, maybe just a little bit anyway...a VERY little bit anyway) ;)

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My method is doing it case by case or person by person. I look at a specific person and ask myself, "what classic film would they like". I have to hold their hand a bit because they know nothing about it at all. I find a film or two that might interest them specifically.

And from there, they are on their own realizing these old films aren't half bad after all.

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Every time I watch YouTube's React channel showing kids who've never seen old movies, the reaction is always the same:  First decade-shaming bravado  ("This looks old, like....PRE-80's!"), then bemusement that it isn't what they'd expected, and then something hooks them, and then the need to look like they were the experts on it all along, lest anyone suspect.  ("Oh, yeah, well, I totally knew that one, we used to watch that one on disk...")

8 hours ago, Sgt_Markoff said:

Shame them into evolving. Make sure they know that some of today's limp pictures are outright remakes of much finer classic films (like the case of 'True Grit').

Nnnope--Nopenopenope.  I GUARANTEE one of the first words that will come out of their mouths, and it starts with a K...And it drops snowglobes.  One of the reasons Millennials are so openly militant about not letting, quote, "Elders" tell them to watch is that the very concept means giving up their "Everything from the 20th century was bad and wrong, and left us stranded in the rubble!".  And the first way that manifests itself in movie discussions is the eternal What's So Great About This Citizen Kane Guy, Anyway? protest, even if it wasn't even the movie you recommended.  Remember, if your birthyear has a 19, a new more responsible generation must clean up after the shameful legacy of your mistakes and the ignorance of your mindless dogma.

My advice, take them to the library:
Recently, there's been an inexplicably venomous Millennial-humor counterattack to paint the very concept of "Going to Blockbuster to rent Blu/DVD's" as some embarrassing shame of the 80's and 90's VHS days--qv. the recent Captain Marvel trailer (she crashes into a Blockbuster--It's set in the 90's, get it??)--and just another indignity their parents had to deal with in that humiliating Stone Age before the Internet empowered a new generation with independence.  Or, as one hip-snarky Millennial-app commercial put it, apropos of nothing, "Remember back when you had to put on your pants to watch a movie?...Neither do we."  (Remember when online streaming services actually had movies you'd heard of?  Neither do I.)  

Then point out that all the movies there are available for free, tell him on the seemingly hush-hush-and-QT that "Nobody knows about this, but I've seen them offering these free classic movies for a while now", and all of a sudden, he'll think HE'S beat the system against all his other friends looking them up on YouTube.  Just don't tell him he's doing exactly what his parents did on Friday nights, when they actually found movies they were looking for, and which studios tried to convince him for seven years was "dying out".

...THEN watch those React-channel reactions kick in.    (Watch them pretend to be Instant Experts on movies they liked--"This is one of the great American Oscar-winning movies of the 20th century...")

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10 hours ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

The new adaptation is much more faithful to the book then the Wayne film.   

Agree, the new adaptation was truer/closer to what the landscape in the book looked like. The Colorado Rockies used in the original doesn't fit at all. 

What the original had was the ability to use stock company of seasoned Western actors that made the good Western films feel as comfortable as an old pair of slippers.

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I kind of already went through this with my step daughter and agree with Nick&Nora's post for the most part.

It's best using the cream of the crop to get them interested in the first place-Hitchcock's PSYCHO is a great one-fast paced and titillating. They'll get interested (those torpedos belong to Jaimie Lee Curtis's MOM) and forget all about the lack of color or the chore of having to follow dialogue. Plus, just mentioning "Hitchcock" should intrigue them.

Then show them SUNSET BLVD, which is great, but more nuanced a story. SOME LIKE IT HOT was a big hit for us, deviating from murder into comedy. STALAG 17 was another great one, if you stay on a Billy Wilder roll.

If you have trouble getting them to even agree to watch b&w, you can always start with super likable classic YOUNG FRANKENSTEIN as a warm up. Classic film isn't for everybody, some may find the themes outdated, so you really need to introduce people to the very best examples first.

The OP lives in Toronto where there is a strong, active classic film community. Once you get your friends past their initial disdain over "old b&w" movies, I highly recommend you all attend a noir or screwball comedy screening to see a classic film in a theater with an audience who's into old films. Cheesy monster movies are also really fun with an audience.

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If you can get YouTube videos like this in Canada, I'd start here. Safety Last is a silent film with Harold Lloyd, from 1923. You can't tell that without playing the video.

 

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14 hours ago, TikiSoo said:

It's best using the cream of the crop to get them interested in the first place-Hitchcock's PSYCHO is a great one-fast paced and titillating. They'll get interested (those torpedos belong to Jaimie Lee Curtis's MOM) and forget all about the lack of color or the chore of having to follow dialogue. Plus, just mentioning "Hitchcock" should intrigue them.

If you have trouble getting them to even agree to watch b&w, you can always start with super likable classic YOUNG FRANKENSTEIN as a warm up. Classic film isn't for everybody, some may find the themes outdated, so you really need to introduce people to the very best examples first.

Because of their central indoctrinated philosophy, even the most willing, open-minded Millennial literally thinks B&W films are "broken", because they came from a less technological time. (Or, apparently, that people from an earlier era couldn't see color, rather like dogs.)  And why would people watch films that haven't been repaired?

But for some reason, when you point out that Young Frankenstein and Psycho were conscious directorial choices--because the director wanted to--all of a sudden, they'll proclaim that those two were the only good B&W movies ever made..."Cool, they were, like, rebels!"  Well, it's a START, anyway.  

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As someone a few years past your stated age bracket, my first piece of advice would be: Don't put down the films that your friends enjoy, stating that they're "movies, not film."  They aren't going to appreciate it.  Frankly, it sounds pretentious.  As someone who loves classic film, if someone put down a film I liked, I would be sure to watch every Pauly Shore movie I could get my hands on, just to make a point (and to get their goat).  Plus, I really love Encino Man.  People are allowed to like what they like.  

With that said, I would first try to gauge my friends' interest in watching classic movies.  Are they even open to the idea?  If they are, start them with a classic that perhaps is comparable with the types of modern films they enjoy watching.  If they're into the superhero action movies, maybe start them with something like The Adventures of Robin Hood (1938, Errol Flynn & Olivia de Havilland), the film is in color and is fun from beginning to end.  If they love the typical rom-com, start them with something like Sabrina (1954, Humphrey Bogart & Audrey Hepburn) or Roman Holiday (1953, Audrey Hepburn & Gregory Peck).  Maybe they idolize Marilyn Monroe but have never seen one of her films? I'd start with Some Like it Hot or How to Marry a Millionaire

If you have a friend that is more hesitant to watch old movies, inquire as to why.  Do they not like black and white? Ease them into classic film by showing them classic color films like The Adventures of Robin Hood, North By Northwest or Rear Window.  Do they think the actors of the era were stiff in terms of acting? Perhaps expose them to some of the more "modern" stars of the classic era like William Holden, Marlon Brando, Burt Lancaster or Robert Mitchum.  Perhaps if you can find out why they're willing to miss out on 80+ years of movie history, you can find something they'll enjoy.

If all that fails, you might have to just face the fact that you may have certain friends with whom you don't watch classic movies.

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most young people would rather watch the walking dead by far than casablanca ... once all the baby boomers die off tcm will morph into another phase ... or perish ...

have a good evening ...

 

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On 2/18/2019 at 10:43 PM, NickAndNora34 said:

I just turned 22. My parents showed me some classic movies when I was very young, and then I got back into it when I got back into theater. I have started off with showing some of my friends "Singin' in the Rain" (1952), and that seemed to pique their interest in classic film. I think you have to kind of pick things from particular genres for different people (bc they all have different tastes). 

No one knows why (well, I do--Show them another snarky wisecracking Comden & Green musical next, like "Band Wagon"), but "Singin' in the Rain" is always THE first movie to show the mythical Someone Who's Never Seen Old Movies Before.

That's "The" as in, THE.  Not Kane.  Not Scarlett.  Not Dorothy.  Not Travis, Norman, Maria or Atticus.  Just Don, Cathy, Cosmo & Lena.

Think Singin' may be unique in that it's literally the last thing the old-movie decade-shamer expects:  Five minutes into the Hollywood premiere, and Don's "Dignity" story, and the hooked moviegoer--and his bemused reaction of "Wait, this is, like...funny!"--realizes it's not going to be the psychotically smiling diving-bathing-beauty movie he pictured in his arrogant imagination when you said "MGM musical".  Muahahahaaa...Why no, it ISN'T, is it?  😈

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3 hours ago, EricJ said:

No one knows why (well, I do--Show them another snarky wisecracking Comden & Green musical next, like "Band Wagon"), but "Singin' in the Rain" is always THE first movie to show the mythical Someone Who's Never Seen Old Movies Before.

That's "The" as in, THE.  Not Kane.  Not Scarlett.  Not Dorothy.  Not Travis, Norman, Maria or Atticus.  Just Don, Cathy, Cosmo & Lena.

Think Singin' may be unique in that it's literally the last thing the old-movie decade-shamer expects:  Five minutes into the Hollywood premiere, and Don's "Dignity" story, and the hooked moviegoer--and his bemused reaction of "Wait, this is, like...funny!"--realizes it's not going to be the psychotically smiling diving-bathing-beauty movie he pictured in his arrogant imagination when you said "MGM musical".  Muahahahaaa...Why no, it ISN'T, is it?  😈

I don't think I've ever watched Singing In The Rain fully through from start to end yet....

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On 2/18/2019 at 1:45 PM, GondolaNoUta said:

 (He gave me a movie and not a film as far as I’m concerned)

 

:rolleyes:

One of those, eh?  ;) 

NOW, I gotta figure out just what you mean by "cinema".  ???   Do you mean to reference MOVIE  THEATERS?  or just general interest in an eclectic taste in movies....

Personally, I call EVERY movie a "movie", and use the term "film" as another word, but not meaning anything special by it.  All depends on my mood and/or which comes to mind first.  But I did read some years back a local movie critic make this distinction---

"A FILM is a MOVIE with pretentious conceit."  ;)  Not necessarily better, but more presumptuous:) 

And too, was a time( before my time I think) when ALL of them were referred to as "Photoplays".

Now, if you're referring to getting a specific age group interested in "classic" movies(ie: film), we've discussed this plenty of times here.  And drew no concrete solutions.  The only thing that seems to work best is exposure to old comedy shorts( Laurel and Hardy, Three Stooges, etc.) either early "talkies" or silents( Lloyd, Keaton, Chaplin etc.) and move up from there.  No "rock solid" guarantee mind you, but worth a try.  At least.....

YOU'LL enjoy the effort!  B)

Sepiatone

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