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GondolaNoUta

How To Get My Age Bracket (20-30) Into Cinema

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I believe a large segment of 20 somethings do not enjoy classic film simply because they have not been exposed to them. But this is really no different than the generations before the Millenials. Raise your hand if you remember the dark days before “the interwebs” when the only people who volutarily watched black and white movies were you and your grandparents. Maybe some friend would watch It’s a Wonderful Life at Christmas. In this respect, the internet and social media have actually benefited the classics. More people have access to these films now and are discovering their magic. I’m well past the age but I know there is a solid classic film following on college campuses these days and anyone brave enough to attempt grad school better know their silver screen lore, because their colleagues certainly do. 

I’m not saying it’s better or worse now but the OP asked how to introduce more people to cinema. I think that’s it, introduce them. Keep introducing them, as many people as you can. Some people will never enjoy fishing, some will not like Film Noir. But let’s be honest, do you really want to be friends with someone who doesn’t enjoy Noir? 

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You're doing what you're complaining about;  taking my comment far too seriously.

-JJG

Since --as you (or Stephan?) admitted recently --my joining this site, came in the middle of an absurd game of "pin-the-tail-on-the-donkey", and led to my being targeted for all manner of accusations and  impugning of my motives, I have an excuse that you do not, in this one instance. I'm entitled to do a little preventive maintenance since I've already been put upon.

It doesn't mean I'm gonna continue harping on it, or now paint you forever as 'someone who once recklessly said something about me'. That's what frequently happens around here.

Nor will I curb my sharp tongue about movies I vehemently dislike. All these things point to my light attitude, see? :P

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1 hour ago, HomeCinemaNerd said:

I believe a large segment of 20 somethings do not enjoy classic film simply because they have not been exposed to them. But this is really no different than the generations before the Millenials. Raise your hand if you remember the dark days before “the interwebs” when the only people who volutarily watched black and white movies were you and your grandparents. Maybe some friend would watch It’s a Wonderful Life at Christmas. In this respect, the internet and social media have actually benefited the classics. More people have access to these films now and are discovering their magic. I’m well past the age but I know there is a solid classic film following on college campuses these days and anyone brave enough to attempt grad school better know their silver screen lore, because their colleagues certainly do. 

I’m not saying it’s better or worse now but the OP asked how to introduce more people to cinema. I think that’s it, introduce them. Keep introducing them, as many people as you can. Some people will never enjoy fishing, some will not like Film Noir. But let’s be honest, do you really want to be friends with someone who doesn’t enjoy Noir? 

My public library shows select classic films for free.

High school kids come in because they have nothing better to do and it's free. Many probably don't intend to stay and then they get hooked. I've watched "The Wizard of Oz" and "Mr Smith Goes to Washington" with these kids. They were so enthralled with these two movies that they actually stopped talking. 

It seems like if they're not forced to watch them and if they happened upon them well, who wouldn't enjoy them?

Afterwards I even heard comments like (about Mr. Smith) well, it was pretty good for a black-and-white movie.  LOL

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4 hours ago, Princess of Tap said:

It seems like if they're not forced to watch them and if they happened upon them well, who wouldn't enjoy them?

Afterwards I even heard comments like (about Mr. Smith) well, it was pretty good for a black-and-white movie.  LOL

I was probably exposed to more classic and obscure movies on the local station, and spent the rest of my formative years trying to find out what it was I watched, when the TV Guide wasn't handy.  (Took me thirty years to identify Eddie Cantor in "Kid Millions".)

Back in those days, movies were literally filler, for stations that had to kill two hours in the morning, afternoon or late night, and you clicked channels because you'd never know what you'd find--But now, stations are too corporate, too provided with syndicated talk/news, and only have money to spend on building up their news divisions, to even bother with filling time for time's sake.  And if they need something at 2am, the friendly local Infomercial will pay them for their time.  Used to be the independent UHF stations that needed plenty of miscellaneous filler between baseball games, but thanks to Fox, CW and MyTV, there ARE no more independent UHF stations.

That's why it's hard to teach kids to read if you close all the libraries.

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12 hours ago, Sgt_Markoff said:

--JamesJazzGuitar

Hold on there please. I never said any such thing. Let's not put words in my mouth, if you don't mind?

To review what I actually have said:

  • Joel and Ethan Cohen are clowns in my opinion.
  • True Grit remake is not a classic film.
  • True Grit remake is a film I dislike.
  • There's a galaxy of differences between any contemporary movie vs any classic movie.
  • Jeff Bridges has a beach-boy aesthetic and is miscast as a cowboy (that's all I said about him, I otherwise like him).
  • I like any classic movie better than I like any contemporary movie.
  • Matt Damon is a twerp, in my opinion. I dislike him.
  • John Malkovich is irrelevant, in my opinion. I dislike him.
  • Classic movies are intrinsically more worthwhile (historical perspective they offer) than contemporary popculture.

I've paraphrased wherever I could not recall my exact phrase. There's not a single statement in the above I'm embarrassed to repeat. There's not a single statement made above, which derides anyone here.

I'm surprised at your willingness to stir the pot in this case, JJG. Not your style. Is anyone here really so thin-skinned they fall to pieces if someone vehemently pipes up with a negative opinion of a movie? Seriously? It provokes vaguely 'personal' backbiting like this? Come on now.

This is why I say people take the internet far too seriously. If we were in a bar and I 'harrumphed' at True Grit-the-remake, you'd shrug and let it roll off your back. Anyone would. It's just movie gab.

(p.s. expletives--what's up with that?) :o

Here's what notice.....

You refer to the TRUE GRIT remake as a "film".

And because YOU don't like it, you're determined it is NOT a "classic".

And more continuance about who you like or dislike.  Fine.

Just show us all that letter form GOD you obviously have in your pocket that GRANTS you all that authority, and we're good.  ;) 

But we do part in a way, as though I've never been REALLY fond of TRUE GRIT, original OR remake, it's no matter to me anyway.  And too, IMHO, JEFF Bridges makes a MUCH better cowboy than I think brother BEAU would.  And anyway too...

NONE of this swill has ANYTHING TO DO with getting the OP's age bracket "into" cinema.  If what was meant by that WAS explained, I missed it.(I wondered if they meant into movie theaters, or an increase in interest.) 

Actually, I don't care if that age group gets "into" cinema, "classic" or otherwise.  But as far as "classic" cinema/movies/film goes, I'll settle for a more intelligent excuse than, "E-w-w-w-w!  It's more than FIVE YEARS OLD! :o "  or....

"Yuck!  It's BLACK AND WHITE!!"  :blink:

Sepiatone

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9 hours ago, Princess of Tap said:

They were so enthralled with these two movies that they actually stopped talking. 

Wow, I'm amazed by that, Tap! Especially Mr Smith, which I find kind of "wordy" for kids.

5 hours ago, EricJ said:

I was probably exposed to more classic and obscure movies on the local station,

Me too, Eric. I'd say TV was my first experience with classic movies. Ones with angels & monsters stick in my mind most: Angels In The Outfield, The Horn Blows At Midnight, Angel on My Shoulder, Day The Earth Stood Still, War Of The Worlds, etc and I still enjoy these movies today.

After school & weekend TV was my education. Although a popular kid, I lived at the farthest edge of town (other side of the RR tracks! Oh my!) and spent lots of time alone, my Mom worked.

I liked the "grown up" story arc and felt like I found some secret stories other kids knew nothing about. My contemporaries were watching tripe like Gilligan's Island and George of The Jungle cartoons.

Plus, Three Stooges and Our Gang shorts got me past the "old" - in fact I embraced the vintage clothes, cars & sets as a glimpse of history. The "kids" TV growing up was the old portable B&W one anyway, haha.

5 hours ago, EricJ said:

That's why it's hard to teach kids to read if you close all the libraries.

Heh, I'm finding kids prefer reading....captions. For whatever reason, even commercials targeting kids have automatic subtitle close captioning. I don't know if this is because kids want to watch monitors/phones on mute or they just can't comprehend the spoken word?

I can barely understand kids speach these days....and I teach 3rd grade. 

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13 hours ago, Sgt_Markoff said:

There's not a single statement in the above I'm embarrassed to repeat. 

Wow and there's some strong opinions stated there, Sgt.

 

13 hours ago, Sgt_Markoff said:

Is anyone here really so thin-skinned they fall to pieces if someone vehemently pipes up with a negative opinion of a movie? Seriously? It provokes vaguely 'personal' backbiting like this? Come on now.

I agree with this statement 100%. However, I do think we can draw more flies with sugar than vinegar and prefer trying to keep the discussion respectful.

 

13 hours ago, Sgt_Markoff said:

This is why I say people take the internet far too seriously. If we were in a bar and I 'harrumphed' at True Grit-the-remake, you'd shrug and let it roll off your back. Anyone would. It's just movie gab.

Agree again ^^^ except for the movie example. I don't hang around in bars, but I'd venture to guess if I loudly said "Star Wars Sucks" some dweeb sloshing down a Bud Light would have a conniption.

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16 hours ago, Sgt_Markoff said:

Classic movies are intrinsically more worthwhile (historical perspective they offer) than contemporary popculture.

What's your "cut-off" date when movies stopped being great? I know you have praised some 1970s films but I was curious if there were any in more modern times that you liked.

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That's a fair question, Jimbo.

I know it probably sounds really 'arbitrary' and 'subjective' on my part, to even hold such an attitude. But in my defense I don't 'draw a line' for this discrimination based on my own personal taste. Instead, I believe that certain changes in the industry itself, demarcate where 'classics' end and 'contemporary' begins.

There's obviously been big changes in the business Hollywood model, the ownership model, and the funding streams, for example. What kind of movies and how many movies were offered then, vs kind/amount being offered now. I look at changes in filmmaking technology; changes in the audience; and also subtle changes in the professional development, training, experience, and overall matriculation of the crews and performers.

Ultimately, it's not a 'precise' line-in-the-sand; and even with the above criteria stated, it may still be something which must be left up to each movie-buff to determine for themselves. I know for myself--based on the above--'generally' where disinterest sets in for me, but that's just me.

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9 hours ago, Det Jim McLeod said:

What's your "cut-off" date when movies stopped being great? I know you have praised some 1970s films but I was curious if there were any in more modern times that you liked.

Yesterday I got a survey from TCM;  it asked what other networks I watch to view classic (1920 - 1970) films. 

Don't know why this survey had those dates,  but there it is.

 

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1 hour ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

Don't know why this survey had those dates,  but there it is.

🕶️ puzzling...

I always liked a MST3K line about the 70's: All orange, all the time!

Haha when I think about the years I consider golden age & classic films, it is very subjective & personal. Anything made before I was born (1961) falls within "classic" film. 😜

Once I'm on the scene, the world becomes "contemporary" and subject to be compared directly with "classic" never measuring up. And of course, the decade preceding mine was the "silver age" downturn from "golden" age from the 30's through 1949.

I'm sure those in their 80's have the same perspective, thinking silents were the "golden age" and the Studio years the "silver".

Now movies are just c r a p p o, spoken like a true senior.

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Another gambit one can offer (I've used it myself) is to play on hormones. Remind kids in their 20s that the men and women of the classic studio era were the most glamorous and gorgeous ever photographed. They outshine today's cheap trash eight ways from Sunday.

Who does not know --even dimly--what the name 'Cary Grant' stands for? Class and style and charisma. At the very least, besides talent too. Its just one example of a real man, not a boy movie star. If your friends are female, tell them how much they're missing out on. Tell them they don't know how a real gentleman behaves or what suave really looks like, unless they see a few of his films.

If your friends are male, same thing. Tell them that they don't know from nuthin' about women unless they at least know one Marilyn Monroe film. Or one Rita Hayworth. Or Ava Gardner. Audrey Hepburn. Sophia Loren. Jackie Bissett. The hottest women of the century. Not pathetic, floundering floozies like J-Lo and Li-Lo and all these other sad sacks, these walking disasters.

Bottom line: anyone with a libido should know what classic beauty is.

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And if these fools are action/adventure fans, remind them that only in classic movies can you see live-filmed (and very dangerous) actual stunts performed by professional stuntmen (and very often stars themselves).

Steve McQueen and Paul Newman, raced cars in their personal lives and incorporated that into their roles at times. The James Bond films made a point of doing car and boat chases 'for real'.

Yves Montand and James Garner drove Formula One cars in the movie 'Grand Prix' with no insurance. And then, horse stunts too. Many a classic actor could sit a horse well. Ben Johnson, former rodeo champ. Fighting: Bruce Lee. 

Basil Rathbone and Christopher Lee, accomplished fencers. Dancing and singing.,,,musicians...sailors...Burt Lancaster, circus background.

These stars were talented people all around, they were world-beaters, in addition to being able to deliver a line and look great doing so.

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Now movies are just c r a p p o, spoken like a true senior.

--Mrs. Tiki-Soo

Me, I came to this honest and heartfelt conclusion before I was halfway through my teens.

So, if what you're saying is that its an "age-related thing", like ..."you young whippersnappers don't know what it means to trudge nine miles to grade school every morning dragging farm equipment up a cliff in the middle of a snowstorm with a butt full of porcupine quills!" --I disagree.

Its not necessarily anything to do the habit of people to valorize the past. It may sound surly and grumpy and dismissive but it can also be a matter of conviction and perspicacity and taste.

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On 2/18/2019 at 10:45 AM, GondolaNoUta said:

My question is how to get the majority of people my age to appreciate films the way I do, both classic and contemporary.

More importantly, how many members are in their 20s and do you have any suggestions. I feel this would help a lot of stressed-out, disillusioned young people by giving them something to appreciate and look forward to in the evening.

For young women I have known, I have suggested Breakfast at Tiffany's (1961) and Gentlemen Prefer Blondes (1953), because Audrey Hepburn and Marilyn Monroe are actresses they are bound to have heard of. And if nothing else they can watch for the styles and fashions.

In my part of town, there are lots of people who modify cars and make low riders. And the 50's style is a major part of that. So at car shows, you see lots of people dressed in the styles of that day.

For young men, its either a war movie like Sahara (1943), or action like the good Ben Hur (1959).

As you stated a difference between a movie and a film. Its not just about watching the film. Its also about understanding the time the film was set in. What was going on. How things were. If you really get into some of these films you can enjoy them more. Just as cosplay has gotten popular, there are those who dress in the style of their favorite classic films.

To get younger people into it, take it farther than just the film. Make it a fun adventure. If you show up one day wearing a fedora, see what your friends have to say.

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1 hour ago, Sgt_Markoff said:

Another gambit one can offer (I've used it myself) is to play on hormones. Remind kids in their 20s that the men and women of the classic studio era were the most glamorous and gorgeous ever photographed. They outshine today's cheap trash eight ways from Sunday.

Who does not know --even dimly--what the name 'Cary Grant' stands for? Class and style and charisma. At the very least, besides talent too. Its just one example of a real man, not a boy movie star. If your friends are female, tell them how much they're missing out on. Tell them they don't know how a real gentleman behaves or what suave really looks like, unless they see a few of his films.

If your friends are male, same thing. Tell them that they don't know from nuthin' about women unless they at least know one Marilyn Monroe film. Or one Rita Hayworth. Or Ava Gardner. Audrey Hepburn. Sophia Loren. Jackie Bissett. The hottest women of the century. Not pathetic, floundering floozies like J-Lo and Li-Lo and all these other sad sacks, these walking disasters.

Bottom line: anyone with a libido should know what classic beauty is.

Classic charm was an engineered product.  Today's gigolos and floozies are also an engineered product.  Biggest difference I see is the boilerplate engineering was far superior in the past, and today's boilerplate engineering has an alterior motive,  "Art for the sake of art" be damned, and often just sucks regardless.  One must see classic film to get it, words cannot convey.  Therein lies the challenge.

P.S. I see I "Confused" you.  Too bad.  I was talking about movies and movie production companies/technique.  I'll just say I wasn't a Liberal Arts major. http://moviecollectoroh.com/pics_to_hotlink_on_TCM/forum-twisted.gif

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Eh. Gotta demur slightly from that POV. There's no fake means of engineering class into a person, nor courage, nor heart. Just as you can't shape the bones in someone's face or give them musical talent if they haven't got any. What 'engineering' from the big studios did Chaplin or Keaton or Dietrich ever benefit by? Mickey Rooney was in vaudeville as a toddler, did a plastic surgeon have any hand in that? How?

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15 hours ago, Sgt_Markoff said:

Eh. Gotta demur with that POV. There's no fake means of instilling someone with class; just as you can't shape the bones in someone's face or give them musical talent if they haven't got any. What 'engineering' from the big studios did Chaplin or Keaton or Dietrich ever benefit by? Mickey Rooney was in vaudeville as a toddler, did a plastic surgeon have any hand in that? How?

Their talent was chosen.  Others were created.  Many more were turned away.  You want to make your own decisions, you start your own production company.  That's kind of where I was going with that.

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2 hours ago, GGGGerald said:

For young women I have known, I have suggested Breakfast at Tiffany's (1961) and Gentlemen Prefer Blondes (1953), because Audrey Hepburn and Marilyn Monroe are actresses they are bound to have heard of. And if nothing else they can watch for the styles and fashions.

As for me, I love old movies, I like Audrey Hepburn as much as the next heterosexual guy, and I STILL wanted to slap Holly Golightly upside the head with a wet trout.  😠  And Gentlemen Prefer Blondes is okay, but Marilyn wasn't quite up to speed with the over-the-top humor of the original musical--They'd practically handed Marilyn the chance she'd always wanted to be a good sport and lampoon "Her"'s image, and she didn't quite seem to be in on the joke.  (Now, "Seven Year Itch", OTOH, Billy Wilder gives her just enough to work with, and her character is Nice rather than Dim,  which surprised most first-time viewers ready to make feministic PC crusades against The Dress Scene.)

With most old-movie 'phobes, it's not that they don't want to see old movies, it's just that they're still carrying around their parent's 70's jokes dismissing "Late night movies" as trivial, silly, outdated, cliche'd, etc., without realizing where those traditions first came from out of our troubled Nixon era.  (When to be happy or sentimental about past times was just pathetic escapism for those who couldn't cope, and cynicism was enlightenment...)  Ask someone to picture "Musical", for example, and they'll probably picture the Smoke number from Esther Williams' "Million Dollar Mermaid"; ask them to picture "Noir", and they'll imitate Humphrey Bogart from "Maltese Falcon", ask them to picture "30's comedy", and they'll think the Keystone Kops were still running around back then.  

The trick is, how do you find the right movie to counteract that, and make them deservingly feel like schmucks for it?  😈  The use of Singin' in the Rain, for ex., has already been mentioned as the best pre-emptive strike against "MGM Musical" cliche's, "The Music Box" is the right strike against "30's comedy", "The Searchers" for those who think all westerns were a white-hat amalgam of John Wayne and Roy Rogers, etc...

...Remember, we're trying to help people who DON'T KNOW ANYTHING.  Why are we considering them a threat?

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The situation is nigh well the same when it comes to books. Peer-compliance, wanting-to-be-hip, herd-behavior --combined with an industry where popular books are often united with highly-promoted cable tv series and movie franchises --all this is making for myopic readers who are highly attuned to things like 'Game of Thrones', 'Hunger Games', 'Divergent', 'Harry Potter', 'Fifty Shades of Gray' and 'Twilight'. Almost entirely fantasy and nothing else. You have to remind them that this detritus is barely even a knock-off from richer fare; ya gotta be able to tell them what the literary precedents were, where these authors copied from, in order to evoke any interest.

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On 2/20/2019 at 8:32 PM, HomeCinemaNerd said:

How Do I Get My Age Bracket (20-30) Into Cinema

Free Hat! Free Hat! Free Hat!

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Maybe if we kept them OUT, every other film wouldn't be a cartoon or a superhero crapfest or yet another remake of something that was better.

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