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papyrusbeetle

If you owned a TV station (like Howard Hughes), what movies would you run constantly?

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Reading about Rock Hudson, i discovered that Howard Hughes was so obsessed with ICE STATION ZEBRA that he would call up his Las Vegas television station, and order them to play the movie all the time!

Must be nice!

So---if you owned your own Television station, and were a reclusive (germaphobe) Billionaire holed up in a hotel with bodyguards, what movie (or movies) would you order up for the entire CITY to watch?

For me, it would be a toss up between: ISLAND OF TERROR (1966), CAT ON A HOT TIN ROOF (1958), and SEVEN SAMURAI (1954).

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If I had Hughes money I wouldn't need a station, as I'd just buy everything I wanted on disc. 

However, my personal choice is that if I owned a movie-centric TV station that was seen by many people (like TCM) I would try not to show the same movie twice for as long as possible.

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That is certainly part of the Hughes legend. I first learned about it reading one of Hunter S. Thompson's compendiums. I think Hughes also owned a drive-in movie theater near his penthouse and he did the same thing; so that when he looked out the window he could see it in the distance there, as well.

Anyway its a great anecdote, Beetle.

LawrenceA has the right idea --thinking of others and being conscientious--but if it were me (and if this wasn't a factor) I would run flicks that are extremely visual and which can be absorbed without dialog. Such as:

  • 2001: A Space Odyssey
  • The Duellists
  • The Way Things Work
  • Last Year at Marienbad
  • Eraserhead
  • Koyaanisqati
  • experimental and avante-garde cinema from the 1920s
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There are two Columbia crime films I like to watch over and over. They're not even my most favorite films of all time. Way down on the list, actually!

They are in black and white and both start with a rainy outdoor sequence during the opening credits. And they just pull me right in. Despite the ludicrousness of the plots in these films, they are infinitely entertaining and watchable. The performances from the leads clinch it.

But yeah, I think I've seen MY NAME IS JULIA ROSS (1945) at least a hundred times...and I've seen THE MOB (1951) about 150 times. The Julia Ross movie is only 65 minutes. And I've been known to finish it and then immediately replay it. Once I played it three times in a row. I never tire of these movies. If I could put them on an endless loop, I would!

Sometimes I tell myself, this must be like putting too much sugar in coffee or tea-- won't I overdo it? When will I get sick of these movies. But I never do. It's fun to have classic films where you can be excessive and hedonistic, and there's no real consequence. So I totally get why Hughes did that.

There are worse vices in life than playing a movie over and over.

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3 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

However, my personal choice is that if I owned a movie-centric TV station that was seen by many people (like TCM) I would try not to show the same movie twice for as long as possible.

👍👍 I want to be a Charter Member!!!

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Hughes was such a fascinating sod. What a life. All the things he saw and did. Wonder what exactly was, his psychological state in the end. I can well understand Scorcese's fascination with him, (but I scoffed at that self-indulgent flick he made). Instead, I like Jason Robards in 'Howard and Melvin'.

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1 hour ago, Sgt_Markoff said:

Hughes was such a fascinating sod. What a life. All the things he saw and did. Wonder what exactly was, his psychological state in the end. I can well understand Scorcese's fascination with him, (but I scoffed at that self-indulgent flick he made). Instead, I like Jason Robards in 'Howard and Melvin'.

The end of his life was interesting, too. He died in Mexico, but they (whoever was caring for Hughes at the end) couldn't announce his death until the corpse was flown back to the U.S. I guess they were afraid of corrupt officials holding the body for ransom, something that could have delayed the settling of the estate. So they had to pretend like he was still living for awhile, until they could smuggle him out of Mexico.

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Yowza. Wild stuff. Y'know I read a biography of him once but I sure didnt recall that part. Maybe I only skimmed it or flipped through the juicy parts. Or, was this bit-of-business only recently unearthed?

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I wouldnt be adverse to an 'all musicals' station even though I am mostly not a fan of musicals. In this case though, I think it would provide a reliable stream of fantasy and otherworldliness.

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20 hours ago, Sgt_Markoff said:

Yowza. Wild stuff. Y'know I read a biography of him once but I sure didnt recall that part. Maybe I only skimmed it or flipped through the juicy parts. Or, was this bit-of-business only recently unearthed?

Not sure if it was recently unearthed. If I remember correctly, they announced he was dead the minute the plane flew over the border, into U.S. airspace. Would be interesting to see a copy of his death certificate, to check whether the dates and cause of death are consistent with what's been reported.

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