Sign in to follow this  
ClassicMovies_fan_chick

Happy 25 TCM! Celebrating the Turner Classic Movies channel a quarter of a century later

43 posts in this topic

From the year 1994 to now, TCM has shown classic films.

From silent to talkies; black and white to colour; beloved to controversial. Foreign and world renounced; from early 20th to late 20th century. 

TCM shows all films which are classic and continue to do so.

 

With great hosts who have film historical background and express their liking of the film showing. Sometimes bringing guests during one of their many monthly spotlights.

 

TCM was and still shows 'Gone with the Wind' regardless of what people think of it today. A film which also was the very first film ever shown when the channel debuted.

 

Happy 25 anniversary Turner Classic Movies! Thank you TCM for all the memories and continue the good work!

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

they have hordes of movies yet to show before they get a single accolade from me. films like hot spell, curse of the crying woman and invasion of the vampires.

Related image

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We should also mention that a lot of classic movies have been made in Hollywood during the years 1994 to 2019.

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, TopBilled said:

We should also mention that a lot of classic movies have been made in Hollywood during the years 1994 to 2019.

Very, Very True!

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
15 hours ago, TopBilled said:

We should also mention that a lot of classic movies have been made in Hollywood during the years 1994 to 2019.

:rolleyes:

Gonna kick over that can of worms, eh?  

But that TCM has stayed the way they started is also worth celebrating, but at my age, I hate to think THAT much time has gone by already.  Reminds me of a line in a song I wrote( about running into an old friend)

" Since then so much has happened to us; that it seems like such a crime;  So many years gone by in so....Short a time!"

Sepiatone

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 minutes ago, Sepiatone said:

:rolleyes:

Gonna kick over that can of worms, eh?  

But that TCM has stayed the way they started is also worth celebrating, but at my age, I hate to think THAT much time has gone by already.  Reminds me of a line in a song I wrote( about running into an old friend)

" Since then so much has happened to us; that it seems like such a crime;  So many years gone by in so....Short a time!"

Sepiatone

I don't see it as a can of worms. And I don't think you're correct in saying that TCM has stayed the same. It's evolved.

But I do think it's worth reminding people that TCM has always tried to include newer classics. It doesn't allow itself to get pigeonholed. Classic film is not defined by the studio era, or even by the 20th century. There is no specific set of years when a classic can be made.

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

:rolleyes:

OY!

By "stayed the way they started" really( and "no-brainer" obvious) meant they remained basically commercial free( plugging their own stuff, like movies they'll sell you or wine from their own wine "club" and that kinda crap doesn't count.  Plus that they don't do so by cutting into a movie for a "break" )  And yes, it IS a "can of worms" due to there's usually someone who insists on arguing over what is MEANT by "classic movies" in the channel's name.  And what too, gets tragically ignored is it only matters how TCM's usage of the word "classic" was intended.  :rolleyes:  NObody at TCM really GIVES a s**t what you, me or anyone ELSE thinks "classic" should mean in this case.

Sepiatone

  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Old article from the Baltimore Sun written on October 31, 1993 about Turner Classic Movies.

Ted Turner is launching a classic movie channel

Charles Haddad
THE BALTIMORE SUN
 

With John Wayne and Humphrey Bogart at his side, next spring Ted Turner will try to muscle his way onto another channel of your cable dial.

Mr. Turner will launch Turner Classic Movies, his ninth channel, April 14, the 100th anniversary of the first commercial movie. The new Turner Broadcasting System channel will feature films 24 hours a day, without commercials.

In going after the classic-movie niche on cable television, Mr. Turner faces a small but innovative competitor in American Movie Classics. The pioneer of a commercial-free cable channel featuring old movies, AMC counts 45 million subscribers and devotees.

"I wouldn't underestimate AMC," says Kim Mitchell, a programming specialist at MultiChannel News, an industry trade magazine. "AMC has a loyal following, and I don't think anybody is going to nab its audience right away."

Why is Atlanta-based Turner Broadcasting, a $2 billion giant with two of the top four cable channels, bothering with a such a specialized niche as a classic-movie channel?

Because the company loves to turn a new buck off an old trick.

Old movies, now referred to as classics, have been the staple of non-network television since the rise of independent stations in the 1950s.

Turner, with a library of some 3,500 films, owns many of these films. That means it can show them repeatedly at little additional cost.

"We're not burdened by huge licensing fees to the studios," says Bradley J. Siegel, the Turner executive vice president who will head Turner Classic.

The introduction of Turner Classic is part of a larger strategic move. The company wants to reposition its two top channels, TNT and SuperStation TBS. Both have long featured Turner library movies, which include films.

But now the company wants these channels to become more commercial, appealing to a wider audience. That means featuring more sporting events and original shows.

"Classic movies do not have the mass appeal of newer movies," says Mr. Siegel.

Turner Broadcasting already produces 10 to 15 original movies a year, but this number should grow substantially once the purchase of two small Hollywood studios is completed.

While the stakes are relatively small for Turner Broadcasting, the company is playing hardball in establishing its new channel. In January, Turner hired Mr. Siegel away from AMC, where he was in charge of programming. Mr. Siegel says he knew nothing about Turner Classic when he left AMC, but his departure was considered a blow, if only momentarily, for the channel.

Mr. Siegel's departure was just the first shot. Next Turner Broadcasting took back 13 of the best titles it had licensed to AMC. That included all of its John Wayne movies and a true classic, "Citizen Kane." The films were part of the 700-title RKO library, which Turner owns.

Taking back these films is part of a larger strategy. Mr. Siegel believes he can force up AMC's operating costs while blocking its ability to expand. Mr. Siegel explains:

While its own library is vast, Turner still licenses more films than any other programmer and gets volume discounts. But its vast purchasing pushes up prices for everyone else.

Not only will AMC pay more, it also will find less to license. "If we up our buying, we shrink what's available out there for AMC," says Mr. Siegel.

Turner Classic also will offer more movies for less, says Mr. Siegel. AMC now features 160 different movies a month. Turner Classic plans to offer 400 -- and charge cable operators less to carry its channel.

Turner Classic, like AMC, will run without commercials. Cable operators must pay for the right to carry either channel.

AMC is not cowed by the big new kid. Says Kate McEnroe, AMC's general manager: "The Turner people tend to be a bit hyperbolic. We don't really see them as a challenger."

Nor is she worried about Turner squeezing AMC out of the niche it pioneered.

By her count, Hollywood made about 10,000 movies between 1930 and 1960, a period the industry refers to as the "Golden Age." Of that, about 7,800 films are in good enough condition to run today, says Ms. McEnroe.

Sure, Turner has a large share, but AMC has exclusive rights running into the next century on about 3,000 films. Ms. McEnroe figures that's enough movies to run a classic channel.

In addition, Ms. McEnroe sees a clear difference between AMC and Turner Classic. Limiting its selection to movies between 1920 and 1970, "AMC goes deeper, while Turner Classic will go broader," featuring any movie.

  • Like 2
  • Thanks 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, calvinnme said:

In addition, Ms. McEnroe sees a clear difference between AMC and Turner Classic. Limiting its selection to movies between 1920 and 1970, "AMC goes deeper, while Turner Classic will go broader," featuring any movie.

Thank you for providing that article. The last paragraph, which I've quoted above, is key to our understanding of how TCM defines classic film and how it does not define classic film. It does not limit it to specific decades.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Just now, TopBilled said:

Thank you for providing that article. The last paragraph, which I've quoted above, is key to our understanding of how TCM defines classic film and how it does not define classic film. It does not limit it to specific decades.

Yes, I've posted this article before to make precisely that argument - that from the beginning TCM would show films from all time periods.

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote

Bradley J. Siegel, the Turner executive vice president who will head Turner Classic.

I don't know that name.   Wonder where is today and what he's doing?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
20 minutes ago, yanceycravat said:

I don't know that name.   Wonder where is today and what he's doing?

All I found was this:

Mr. Bradley Siegel, also known as Brad, served as the President of TV One at Urban One, Inc. since August 31, 2015 until July 25, 2017. Mr. Siegel was responsible for overseeing and leading all business and creative aspects of the network. He served as the President of Turner's Entertainment Networks of Turner Broadcasting System, Inc. He served at TBS, Inc. from January of 1993 to 2003. He co-founded cable network UP. In a prior role with Turner, he served as President and General Manager of TNT, TBS and Turner Classic Movies (TCM). While overseeing Cartoon Network, he orchestrated the creation of the popular Adult Swim programming block of animated series to attract more adults 18 to 34 to the network. In 1994, he created Turner Classic Movies, one of the most acclaimed and successful new networks in the past 15 years. He joined TBS, Inc. in January 1993 from American Movie Classics (AMC), where as Vice President of Programming and Production from 1988 to 1992, he was responsible for the development and administration of all programming and production strategies. He was also responsible for signing such legendary talent as Debbie Reynolds, Omar Sharif, Shirley Jones, Dottie Lamour and Ceasar Romero. In his career, Mr. Siegel served as Vice President of Programming at Bridgeways Communications, where he developed new program formats, scheduling and original programming for WBCT and WHAI-TV in Westport, Conn. From 1982 to 1988, he was one of the founders of New York's Campus Network, where he served as Vice President and General Manager, later he developed National College Television (NCTV), an advertiser-supported program network servicing 450 college television stations and 13 million cable homes. His first job after college was Promotion Director for New York-based Sportswise magazine. He served as Vice Chairman of UP Entertainment LLC (formerly Gospel Music Channel, LLC) and serves as its Director. He serves as a Member of the Arts & Science Council at Washington University. He served on the Board of Directors of UNICEF and Camp Sunshine. He received the Distinguished Alumni Award in 2000. He is the recipient of 1997' s National Cable Television Association Vanguard Award for Leadership and received New York's Ensemble Studio Theatre's 1999 Creative Vision Award. Mr. Siegel holds a Bachelor of Arts Degree in History and Art History from Washington University in St. Louis (1979).

https://www.bloomberg.com/research/stocks/private/person.asp?personId=21789097&privcapId=9768509

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On April 6, 2019 at 1:54 PM, NipkowDisc said:

they have hordes of movies yet to show before they get a single accolade from me.

Gosh.  And the whole world was holding its breath. . . .

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
15 hours ago, Sepiatone said:

And what too, gets tragically ignored is it only matters how TCM's usage of the word "classic" was intended.  :rolleyes:  NObody at TCM really GIVES a s**t what you, me or anyone ELSE thinks "classic" should mean in this case.

Sepiatone

Now I feel two inches tall.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Buck up!.....

There's been PLENTY of times when that would TOWER over me;) 

Sepiatone

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

How Turner Classic Movies Built a Marquee Brand by Catering to Film Fans

 

"Turner Classic Movies, the last cable channel launched by Ted Turner as an independent media mogul, is hitting its silver on-air anniversary this month. But the TCM brand is well positioned to enter a golden age as the tide turns in the marketplace for cable TV channels.

TCM has spent 25 years building up a community of film fanatics who love the channel itself, not just the movies it screens........

TCM has a gold-plated brand because it was designed to appeal to movie devotees rather than a mass audience. The decision was made early on to keep it commercial-free, and the mantra of “no edits and no interruptions” has held firm through successive regimes at Turner, and now Warner Bros.

“Context and curation is what we’re known for,” says Charlie Tabesh, senior VP of programming for Turner Classic Movies. “We’ve never programmed the channel with ratings in mind. If we did, we wouldn’t be playing silent films or 1930s black-and-white movies.”.......

 

“This was not going to be a channel to celebrate old Hollywood,” says Brad Siegel, who headed Turner’s entertainment arm at the time TCM was conceived. “We wanted it to be something completely unique, like a magazine that was a smart read for people who love film.” TCM from the get-go has also shelled out to license movies from other studios and sources.

“We wanted to lay claim to offering the best mix of classic movies — with a definition of ‘classic’ as something that was really good, not by a chronological time period,” Siegel says. “To do that we had to have more than just the movies we owned.” ......

The TCM vault is stocked with so many thousands of titles and obscurities that even 25 years later, “detective work” is still required to keep on top of everything there is to offer, according to Tabesh. To wit, eight 1930s titles from the RKO days recently surfaced that have never played on the channel. To Tabesh, that’s a big score.

“Even when you think you’ve gone through everything, you start finding things,” he says.

One of the biggest challenges in recent years has been grappling with the march of time and changing cultural attitudes and social norms......

“It’s the only fan-driven network like this on television,” .......

https://variety.com/2019/tv/features/turner-classic-movies-25-anniversary-ted-turner-1203183315/

 

  • Thanks 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

25 years later, TCM still abides (so movie lovers pray)

By JAKE COYLEtoday
 
 

"......“We view ourselves as the keeper of the flame,” says Jennifer Dorian, general manager of TCM. “We’re stronger than ever.”

That will be good news to the TCM fans whose heart rates quickened after AT&T’s takeover of Time Warner, which had bought Turner Broadcasting back in 1996. That led to restructuring, announced last month, that placed TCM in WarnerMedia’s “global kids and young adults” subdivision, along with Cartoon Network and Adult Swim. WarnerMedia also shut down TCM’s nascent streaming service, FilmStruck , last November after deeming it a “niche service.” WarnerMedia is to launch a larger streaming platform later this year.

The demise of FilmStruck prompted an outcry from the likes of Steven Spielberg, Martin Scorsese and Christopher Nolan who petitioned WarnerMedia for its preservation. Some of the biggest names in Hollywood had TCM’s back.

One privately told Mankiewicz: “If you think we’re mad about FilmStruck, wait ’til you see what we do if anyone messes with the network.”

Yet the shuttering of FilmStruck (its streaming partner, Criterion Collection , relaunched as a stand-alone service on Monday) reinforced concerns that amid all the juggling and bundling of merging conglomerates, TCM might slip through the digital cracks.......

 

“The fact that there are really passionate, vocal people out there helps us sort of stay the course. I think our corporate bosses don’t want to upset those people,” says Charlie Tabesh, TCM’s programming chief and a 21-year veteran at the network. “While you can never promise anything, I’ve been through it enough that I’d be surprised if they changed it.”

Change can be a dirty word around TCM. “Lower case ‘c,’ please,” says Mankiewicz. “Evolve” is more preferable. TCM is, after all, a place where time nearly stops. In the 25 years since its founding,

its focus remains overwhelmingly the golden age of Hollywood. Movies from the ’30s, ‘40s and ’50s, Tabesh says, make up approximately 70 percent of its programming.

“That’s our bread and butter,” says Mankiewicz.....

As far as TCM’s place in the rapidly changing streaming world, Dorian says that’s “TBD.” ″There’s a world of opportunity in front of us with streaming. I do not know the right approach for TCM at this moment,” she says. “At our company, we’re developing our new plan right now.” .....

 

“It feels momentous. It feels like we really accomplished something. It’s a quarter of a century,” says Mankiewicz.

“If you asked me what I’d like to be doing in another 25 years, I hope to be introducing movies on TCM, having debates about whether you should remake the ‘The Thin Man’ and listening to those who say, ‘You’re showing too many modern movies!’”

https://apnews.com/7341e075894d4a75b5affc0b4fba1a31

 

 

  • Thanks 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
23 minutes ago, mr6666 said:

TCMVerified account @tcm 14m14 minutes ago

 

As we celebrate the 25th anniversary of TCM which was born on this day in 1994,

we want to know your favorite film from the year you were born.

Share your pick ...........

hero_EB20010121REVIEWS08101210301AR.jpg

My pick

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
18 minutes ago, LawrenceA said:

My Pick

image.jpg

I had to do a Google Image search to figure out what this film was.  Lawrence, you wear your age well 😉

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

New Members:

Register Here

Learn more about the new message boards:

FAQ

Having problems?

Contact Us