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National Film Registry: Having One's Say for Next Year

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For the last two years, and maybe earlier, TCM has featured films picked for the National Film Registry earlier the same day. The registry is a wonderful program that preserves 25 films or shorts a year, and one perk that i think TCM fans would love to know about is that you can fill out a ballot suggesting to them what they should preserve next that they haven't before...... By filing by mid-September, your ballot of up to 50 titles might have bearing on what they pick this year, and consequently what might be on TCM in December. 

Here is the link to the first part of the ballot before you get to listing films (which you can do after filling out this page): https://www.research.net/r/national-fim-registry-nomination-form

And here is a very long list of notable eligable titles arranged by year that haven't been picked yet. https://www.loc.gov/programs/national-film-preservation-board/film-registry/films-not-yet-named-to-the-registry/

I did one of these last year, and I think a few of the films on it made it in, so it couldn't hurt. Have fun, movie fans! :)

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I always send in selections every year but none have yet been chosen for the Registry.

 

Maybe this time?? :)

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Sorry to detract from the intention of the original post, but one question I have about this process is what is the connection between restoring a film and the current rights holder(s) of the film.  I would suppose that the Library of Congress cannot just restore any film that might be nominated by the public - they must be able to get access to the component parts of the film and they must also have the permission and cooperation of whoever owns the current rights to the film.

Similarly, once a film is restored, what happens to the restored version and what becomes of the rights to be able to display the film or transfer the film to a form that could be marketed to the public.

There is another thread here where we have been discussing the Paramount films that have never/seldom been shown on TCM and how these titles are likely just languishing in a vault somewhere.  May I respectfully say it seems like a somewhat misleading program if a film is restored and then it just goes right back to another vault where the general public cannot see the film, short of the film’s appearance in a rare showing somewhere or requiring travel to Washington, D.C. to seek it out.

As another example, I noticed that My Fair Lady was added to the list last year.  With all the DVD and Blu-Ray releases this film has gone through, why in the world would My Fair Lady need any additional effort spent on preservation by the L.O.C. when there are so many other films that have been ignored?

I would very much appreciate if anyone can provide insight into how this works.

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15 minutes ago, cmovieviewer said:

I would very much appreciate if anyone can provide insight into how this works.

Not sure on this NFR/LOC petition, but overall I'd defer to the late great George Carlin: "It's a big club, and you ain't in it".

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25 minutes ago, MovieCollectorOH said:

Not sure on this NFR/LOC petition, but overall I'd defer to the late great George Carlin: "It's a big club, and you ain't in it".

I don't want to be pessimistic/negative, but if the program doesn't result in the general public being able to see more readily available films, then it sounds like more of a popularity contest for the sake of a list and not much of substance is actually being done.

Eddie Muller and the Film Noir Foundation have done some great work in restoring nearly-lost Noir films that we are now able to enjoy, so I'm sure he can address my questions about restoration in general.  If only he would reply...

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1 hour ago, cmovieviewer said:

Sorry to detract from the intention of the original post, but one question I have about this process is what is the connection between restoring a film and the current rights holder(s) of the film.  I would suppose that the Library of Congress cannot just restore any film that might be nominated by the public - they must be able to get access to the component parts of the film and they must also have the permission and cooperation of whoever owns the current rights to the film.

My understanding is that in order to register your copyright, you have to deposit a copy with the Library of Congress.

When TCM ran the Fragments documentary (I think it's that one), it was mentioned that some of the fragments existed because early filmmakers would deposit only part of a work with the LoC as positive photographs (instead of a nitrate of the whole film); technically the rest of the movie wouldn't be copyrighted but it also wouldn't make any sense without the copyrighted scenes.  Those fragments have been restored to moving images flipbook style.

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I have to redo my lit.  I was on the site and some of the films I listed are actually on the film registry.  

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I just went on the National Film Registry sites films not yet added and I Was a Male War Bride isn't even listed.  How can that and some other films not be listed?  But that I the list I will submit.

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