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Hope and Glory

46 posts in this topic

21 hours ago, CinemaInternational said:

Yes, Last Emperor and Nuts are both very impressive films as well.... Someday I neeed to get around to finishing Empire of the Sun.... Always wanted to see Bagdad Cafe and Good Morning Vietnam. Fatal Attraction would have been better with the original ending, but the performances hold up. Also another I didn't mention: Dead of Winter is a good loose remake of My Name is Julia Ross, even if you can tell that the dead bodies in it are obviously wax dummies.

As for 80s years, its definitely a strong one, but I give the slight edge to 1988. For the following films came out in that year: My Neighbor Totoro, Cinema Paradiso, Women on the Verge of a Nervous Breakdown, Tucker: The Man and His Dream, The Accidental Tourist, Running on Empty, A Cry in the Dark, Zelly and Me, Stormy Monday, Camille Claudel, Another Woman, Moon Over Parador, Who Framed Roger Rabbit, Grave of the Fireflies, Married to the mob, Working Girl, Rain Man, Beaches....

f ok  my comp lasts  can  give my personal star rating  each flix you seleted & it's domestic $B.O.$???

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1 hour ago, RoyCronin said:

I guess the original cast would have been too old for the sequel. Billy is around 18 in the sequel but  Hope and Glory was almost 30 years ago at the time it was made.

Despite being shut out of those ACADEMY AWARDS-(as was his brilliant DELIVERANCE) it's still very good, though no match for the unniominated  UNTOUCABLES, FULL METAL JACKET, THE DEAD & a few others that Osca

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22 hours ago, TopBilled said:

One of the best films of 1987, if not THE best.

screen-shot-2019-05-18-at-5.42.10-pm.jpe

Top Billed:  I too loved this film, but alas, my mother who lived through the blitz, I believe saw the whole thing in black and white, was not too amused with the film.  But I will give John Boorman credit as this story views the blitz through the mind and eyes of a child whereas my mom saw it and experienced it as a young adult.  Until I saw this particular movie my view of the blitz was black and white too so I was delighted to view the event through a different lens.  Emily

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4 minutes ago, Emily Dean said:

Top Billed:  I too loved this film, but alas, my mother who lived through the blitz, I believe saw the whole thing in black and white, was not too amused with the film.  But I will give John Boorman credit as this story views the blitz through the mind and eyes of a child whereas my mom saw it and experienced it as a young adult.  Until I saw this particular movie my view of the blitz was black and white too so I was delighted to view the event through a different lens.  Emily

Beautiful comment Emily. Thank you!

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About a week ago I attempted-(but again this computer stopped me almost through this decade at no 4 or so I mostly compiled-(again lifted from my files) the top ten best films of each decade starting with the l980s

& not only cited my top 10, but AFI;s top ten that year In short  just how many great 4 star releases there are now vs then-I rated 10 new releases ****-stars for '82, now maybe one per year?)

Thir state of the art & FREE from my 26 year old knowining buddy (HENRY) currently suffering from prostate CANCER! Gave me this newest computer, speakers the works & even hookedall up FREE as well, but as it gets warmer the more difficulty I seem to hsve?   So, hope you true cinrphiles find it ok if & when I can list thse tip ten by decade again soon??? SO< PLEASE KEEP WORKING MCHINE I DON'T HAVE MUCH FOLKS & TO YOU, LEASE BEAR WITH ME WHEN I;M TRYING TO EITHER POST SOMETHING OR REPUU???   

 

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My own Top 10 from 1987:

1. Full Metal Jacket (Stanley Kubrick, USA)
2. Broadcast News (James L. Brooks, USA)
3. Wings of Desire (Wim Wenders, West Germany)
4. Project A, Part II (Jackie Chan, Hong Kong)
5. Au Revoirs, Les Enfants (Louis Malle, France)
6. The Untouchables (Brian DePalma, USA)
7. Babette's Feast (Gabriel Axel, Denmark)
8. Withnail & I (Bruce Robinson, UK)
9. Good Morning, Vietnam (Barry Levinson, USA)
10. Moonstruck (Norman Jewison, USA)

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1 minute ago, sewhite2000 said:

My own Top 10 from 1987:

1. Full Metal Jacket (Stanley Kubrick, USA)
2. Broadcast News (James L. Brooks, USA)
3. Wings of Desire (Wim Wenders, West Germany)
4. Project A, Part II (Jackie Chan, Hong Kong)
5. Au Revoirs, Les Enfants (Louis Malle, France)
6. The Untouchables (Brian DePalma, USA)
7. Babette's Feast (Gabriel Axel, Denmark)
8. Withnail & I (Bruce Robinson, UK)
9. Good Morning, Vietnam (Barry Levinson, USA)
10. Moonstruck (Norman Jewison, USA)

Mine (I can't resist lists) out of 255 movies seen:

  1. Raising Arizona
  2. Robocop
  3. Predator
  4. Evil Dead 2
  5. Full Metal Jacket
  6. Angel Heart
  7. Near Dark
  8. The Princess Bride
  9. The Untouchables
  10. Withnail & I

Runner-ups: Radio DaysHope & GloryHellraiserPrince of DarknessMatewanThe Last EmperorWings of DesireLethal WeaponThe HiddenEmpire of the SunBroadcast NewsBabette's FeastAu Revoir les EnfantsAmazon Women on the Moon

Special mention: Miami Connection, Rock 'n' Roll Nightmare (among the top 25 best worst movies of all time)

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23 hours ago, CinemaInternational said:

There are some others from 1987 that are wonderful too: The Dead, The Whales of August, 84 Charing Cross Road, Broadcast News, Moonstruck, Radio Days, Wish You Were Here, La Bamba, Cry Freedom, Pelle the Conqueror, Street Smart, Raising Arizona, Au Revoir Les Enfants, House of Games.

The Dead and Radio Days are the two best films of 1987, I think.  Actually, this Anglophile was curiously underwhelmed by Hope and Glory. To paraphrase E.M. Forster, it didn't connect.

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It was a strong year for cinema, for sure. Looking at some other lists on here, I would say if I expanded my own list to 20 or 30 films, many of the selections made by all of you would be on it.

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As for Boorman's very good (3 & 1/2) HOPE & GLORY (***1/2) As I write to a detractor of the film, to it's credit it made the BP cut of  Especially considering likes of the movie year we had *LAST EMPEROR-(went 9 for 9 & very strong, but who talks about it now?)  my fav of '87 by far, well close wih the magnificent Kubtick Vietnam epic FULL METAL...  But, THE UNTOUCABLES I loved so much I went back to it,, something  rarely do thesedays. Broadcast News I also went back to mainly because of  Holly Hunter, of whom I developed a crush on & during ,y 2nd viewing of that wonfderful film! Plus, Albert Brooks breaks me up BIG-TIME! ^ & as for the $B.O.$ behemoth FATAL ATTRACTION (strong ***) & 157m for me, but didn't really deserve a BP shot vs others left out that year, most notable JOHN HUSTON-(l906-87) swan sing to both his beloved IRELAND & CINEMA  THE DEAD at just 83 minutes I still think it's sheer perfection, I;m prejudice as many know due to it being IRISH & most of it cast are already gone to drink. Irish opera star Frank Patterson in a beautifully sung musical sequence, died soon After at only 58. Star Donal McCann, alcoholism & more. Not Oscar winner Anjelica Huston though & many critics were upset she was snubbed & it only got 1 nod by HOLLYWOOD for screenolay? & BE CERTAIN IF UOU EVEN WATCH IT FOR IT'S INSTANT CLASSIC GRAND FINALE BY McCann LOOKING OVER THE NIGHTIME SNOW OF IRELABD@! Book was written by James Joyce Soif I were an ACADEMY member & they are so uptight about just joining too BP contenders woulda been: *THE UNTOUCHABLES-(winner) FULL METAL JACKET, BROADCAST NEWS, THE DEAD & *LAST EMPEROR, [;us we had the instant cult flick & jut abot excellen to RAISING ARIZONA

& another reason my friend most, especially nowadsydys (AREN'T YOU ALL FED UP WITH TALKING TO A MILLENIAL ABOUT SOMETING & THEY IMMEDIATELY SAY O, THAT WAS BEFORE MY TIME)  FOR THOSE THAT MAY NOT KNOW MILLENNIALS ARE THOSE BORN IN '85 to date

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Found nothing to like about this film, bad story, script, acting – no realism/believability/entertainment just a poorly done lengthy ‘80s type sitcom?…viewing this crap simply makes one really appreciate the war type classics such as Das Boot (8.9), Paths of Glory (8.4), The Best Years of Our Lives (8.1), Two Women (7.9), To Have and Have Not (7.9), Casablanca (8.5), Hail the Conquering Hero (7.7), etc.

 

(IMDb rating)

 

Beyond disappointing. 👎

💋

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Just now, JeanneCrain said:

Found nothing to like about this film, bad story, script, acting – no realism/believability/entertainment just a poorly done lengthy ‘80s type sitcom?…viewing this crap simply makes one really appreciate the war type classics

The critics were in love with the idea of the WWII-boyhood "neato war" as seen through our young character's eyes (when most wartime-childhood stories are about Eviction-Summer in the countryside) but unfortunately, that's all it is:  All reminiscences, no PLOT.  And precious less point, by the end of the movie.

It's a collection of nice colorfully evocative moments from the trailer and critic-blurbs, but I kept waiting for something to tie it together into a, y'know, movie.

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Wow, I thought it was a lot better than "crap". It is maybe too overloaded with bits and is a bit episodic, but there were many elements I liked: the unspoken love between the mother and the uncle, the near-hostility of the teacher toward her students as she lets them know what the war is all about, the casual thoughtlesness of the neighborhood children toward the girl whose mother has just been killed, etc.

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And it was great to see Sarah Miles again after what seemed like a long respite.  I really like the scene with the children in the train station.  The woman who scolds her: "on your head be it".  Fabulous. 

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4 hours ago, spence said:

To CinemaIntertnationsal, now be hest did you look this up-(GOOGLE0 before hand, before an excellent job buddy either way!!!

I looked up what i had seen from 1988 and some titles I loved although it seems I left out Stand and Deliver that I loved...

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4 hours ago, RoyCronin said:

And it was great to see Sarah Miles again after what seemed like a long respite.  I really like the scene with the children in the train station.  The woman who scolds her: "on your head be it".  Fabulous.

Yeah, that's maybe the best scene in the whole movie, showing how children can't help but earnestly letting their parents know how they're failing them (in the perception of the child, anyway). First, Billy hates his mother for sending him off to Australia ("I'm going to miss the whole war, and it's YOUR fault!"). Then, she gets hysterical, and the uncle retrieves the children, and now Billy hates her for embarrassing him with her emotional clinging. Wounded, she tells him icily, "Do as you please", but now the scolding woman is fed up with all this disruption of procedure and tells the mother she's going to have to start the whole process over. Great scene.

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Reading this thread,  this just dawned on me: isn't "Hope and Glory" very similar to "Radio Days", structurally? 

Highly episodic, many terrific separate vignettes,  very disjointed with no major plot line?

Please feel free to correct me if you disagree or are of like-mind.

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5 hours ago, RoyCronin said:

Reading this thread,  this just dawned on me: isn't "Hope and Glory" very similar to "Radio Days", structurally? 

Highly episodic, many terrific separate vignettes,  very disjointed with no major plot line?

Back in '87-'88, we tied it in with Spielberg's "Empire of the Sun", and thought they were starting a "genre" of disjointed/episodic wartime-childhood films.

Until I watched Radio Days again, factored it in with Woody's 80's Fellini/Bergman-cribbing phase, and by the time we got the big Fellini-esque New Year's Eve farewell party-fantasy in the final shot ("Beware, evildoers..."), I realized:  "(head thump) D'ohh!...'AMARCORD'!! 😮 No wonder Woody wanted to do it!"

(Right down to the Crazy Family/Relatives and Peeping on the Sexy Teacher, although Josh Mostel never climbs a tree and shouts for a woman.)

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On 5/24/2019 at 2:48 PM, sewhite2000 said:

Wow, I thought it was a lot better than "crap". It is maybe too overloaded with bits and is a bit episodic, but there were many elements I liked: the unspoken love between the mother and the uncle, the near-hostility of the teacher toward her students as she lets them know what the war is all about, the casual thoughtlesness of the neighborhood children toward the girl whose mother has just been killed, etc.

YES. CRAP? I DON'T THINK SO.

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On 5/24/2019 at 3:20 PM, RoyCronin said:

And it was great to see Sarah Miles again after what seemed like a long respite.  I really like the scene with the children in the train station.  The woman who scolds her: "on your head be it".  Fabulous. 

YES. She had some powerful scenes in the movie. She had quit making films for a time. Not being happy with how her career was going. I guess she needed to make a living again. She still had it.

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On 5/23/2019 at 3:51 PM, CinemaInternational said:

Always wanted to see Bagdad Cafe and Good Morning Vietnam.

Strange that Robin Williams gets his face on the cultural-movie cover of 1987, with so many other great films, most of them TopBilled's honorable-mentions.  

I keep defending Good Morning Vietnam, though, not just because Williams kept snarkily dissing the movie because of his "Aladdin" tiff with Disney (I'm still not sure why he turned down a proposed 1968-set "Good Morning, Chicago" sequel), but it's easily his second-funniest movie ever, just behind Aladdin and ahead of Popeye, if that's what we have to choose from--Like most late-80's/early-90's $1.98 Disney bulk McMovies (of which "Three Men & and a Baby" was one of the better ones), it's not a strong story, but it's a great historical-comic experiment in "What if Robin Williams had been cutting loose in 1967"?

On 5/23/2019 at 3:51 PM, CinemaInternational said:

As for 80s years, its definitely a strong one, but I give the slight edge to 1988. 

Eh...Everyone knows the "great" movie years of the 80's were '82 (ET, Blade Runner) and '84 (Amadeus, Ghostbusters).  '81 had its Great moments, but they were mostly about getting the 80's started.

(And are there STILL third-generation Japanese-anime fanboys passing down the father-to-son tradition of assaulting poor innocent newbies with "Oh man, you have to see Grave of the Fireflies, it's so cool and serious!"?  We thought we'd finally eradicated them, through education, outreach, and availability to more resources.)

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