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skimpole

Criterion: 1000 releases and counting

64 posts in this topic

3 hours ago, laffite said:

I've read all the posts and see it is about purchasing and cover art ... no mention (primarily) of the Criterion Channel about which I have only recently known. Any takers on that and if so, any insider info or personal experiences. I hope this is not OT. I still need to look further as to how it works but I thought I would put out a feeler here as well. I might well spring $11 a month for that. Thanks.

If there's more detail you are looking for, just ask.

I'll add that the majority of the Criterion disc titles are available, as well as many more foreign films, short films, and some classic American films. There seems to be less of the classic studio-era American films than there was on FilmStruck, but still quite a few.

Most of the films that are also available on disc have all of the bonus features included on the site, and you can choose to watch any, all or none of them. There are currently 1828 titles available to stream - there's an option to see every available film listed, and then the ability to filter the list by decade, genre, country of origin, or director.

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10 minutes ago, LawrenceA said:

If there's more detail you are looking for, just ask.

Thanks, Lawrence ... I appreciate that. Are there any restrictions that would shock someone that had the Netflix streaming plan? I don't have that anymore (although I do DVDs). Criterion is actually cheaper than the Netflix streaming plan. This latter has very little to offer me. I am looking more and more to try out Criterion.

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21 minutes ago, laffite said:

Thanks, Lawrence ... I appreciate that. Are there any restrictions that would shock someone that had the Netflix streaming plan? I don't have that anymore (although I do DVDs). Criterion is actually cheaper than the Netflix streaming plan. This latter has very little to offer me. I am looking more and more to try out Criterion.

I'm not sure what you mean by restrictions. There are none that I'm aware of. Do you mean like a limit on how many movies you watch? There is no limit. You could watch as many as you wish, and as often as you wish. If you're interested in the kind of stuff Criterion offers (and I think you would be, based on your comments) then I would recommend it very highly. It's a must-have, and better than Netflix's streaming offerings, at least for me. 

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Here are directors #11-20 of the 100 greatest directors, and how they did in Criterion:

Ozu (Good Morning [84], Tokyo Story, A Story of Floating Weeds/Floating Weeds, Early Summer, Late Spring, An Autumn Afternoon, The Only Son, There was a Father, The Flavor of Green Tea Over Rice)

Scorsese (The Last Temptation of Christ [70], The Age of Innocence)

Bunuel (The Discreet Charm of the Bourgeoisie [102], Diary of a Chambermaid, That Obscure Object of Desire, The Phantom of Liberty, Viridiana, The Milky Way, The Exterminating Angel, Simon of the Desert, Belle de Jour)

Tarkovsky (Andrei Rublev [34], Solaris, Ivan's Childhood, Stalker)

Chaplin (Modern Times [543], The Great Dictator, The Gold Rush, Monsieur Verdoux, City Lights, Limelight, The Kid, The Circus)

Wilder (Ace in the Hole [396], Some Like it Hot)

Bresson (Les Dames du Bois de Boulogne [183], Diary of a Country Priest, Au Hasard Balthazar, Pickpocket, Mouchtte, A Man Escaped, L'Argent)

Dreyer (The Passion of Joan of Arc [62], Day of Wrath, Ordet, Gertrud, Vampyr, Master of the House)

Murnau  Nothing, Nada, Nil

Antonioni (L'avventura [98], L'eclisse, Red Desert, Identification of a Woman, La notte, Le Amiche, Blow-Up)

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1 hour ago, skimpole said:

Here are directors #11-20 of the 100 greatest directors, and how they did in Criterion:

Murnau  Nothing, Nada, Nil

And pretty much all covered by Kino Classics, as they're the silent-movie label with the Russian and German-Expressionist tendencies.  Same for Fritz Lang and Sergei Eisenstein.

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On 7/31/2019 at 4:31 AM, skimpole said:

This list does not include [...] Eclipse series.

Bergman (The Seventh Seal [11], Autumn Sonata, The Magic Flute, Cries and Whispers, Wild Strawberries, Through a Glass Darkly, Winter Light, The Silence, Scenes from a Marriage, Smiles of a Summer Night, Fanny and Alexander, The Virgin Spring, Sawdust and Tinsel, The Magician, Summer Interlude, Summer with Monica, Persona, Shame)

Kurosawa (Seven Samurai [2], High and Low, Yojimbo, Sanjuro, The Hidden Fortress, Rashomon, Red Beard, Throne of Blood, Ikiru, Stray Dog, The Lower Depths, Kagemusha, Ran, The Bad Sleep Well, Drunken Angel, Dodes'ka-den, Dreams)

 

12 hours ago, skimpole said:

Ozu (Good Morning [84], Tokyo Story, A Story of Floating Weeds/Floating Weeds, Early Summer, Late Spring, An Autumn Afternoon, The Only Son, There was a Father, The Flavor of Green Tea Over Rice)

You should include the Eclipse sets.

That would add 5 more Bergman films (Eclipse #1: Early Bergman), 9 more Kurosawa films (Eclipse #7: Postwar Kurosawa and Eclipse #23: The First Films of Akira Kurosawa), and 11 more Ozu films (Eclipse #3: Late OzuEclipse #10: Silent Ozu - 3 Family Comedies, and Eclipse #42: Silent Ozu - 3 Crime Dramas).

Plus there's the Bergman box-set , Ingmar Bergman's Cinema, which has an additional 15 movies not available individually or in the Eclipse set. 

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On 7/26/2019 at 5:48 AM, LornaHansonForbes said:

unpopular opinion here- CRITERION is the WHOLE FOODS of film sources- lovely packaging, but about $15.00 too much, and not validated by the "extras."

This is precisely why I have decided to only purchase movies from the 1930's-1960's on Criterion that are unavailable on Blu Ray. Sure, the artwork is great, but it's not enough for me to spend my money on. 

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On 8/7/2019 at 1:16 AM, skimpole said:

Bunuel (The Discreet Charm of the Bourgeoisie [102], Diary of a Chambermaid, That Obscure Object of Desire, ...

Nice to see that last even mentioned. Unlike Discreet, which is always turning up here and there, Obscure seems to be rare and hard to find.

21 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

That would add 5 more Bergman films (Eclipse #1: Early Bergman),

My local library has that one and I would like to steal it.

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16 minutes ago, laffite said:

Nice to see that last even mentioned. Unlike Discreet, which is always turning up here and there, Obscure seems to be rare and hard to find.

My local library has that one and I would like to steal it.

I've watched 3 of the 5 in that set: TormentCrisis, and Port of Call. I liked all three of them. One day I'll get around to Thirst and To Joy.

Many of the earlier-released Bunuel Criterion movies are long out of print. The Discreet Charm of the BourgeoisieDiary of a Chambermaid, The Phantom of LibertyThe Milky Way, and That Obscure Object of Desire are all unavailable at the moment. However, some are coming out on disc from other distributors. I have Discreet and The Milky Way from other companies. And Diary of a Chambermaid is available to stream on the Criterion Channel at the moment. I'm hoping to see The Phantom of Liberty eventually.

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43 minutes ago, LawrenceA said:

I've watched 3 of the 5 in that set: TormentCrisis, and Port of Call. I liked all three of them. One day I'll get around to Thirst and To Joy.

Of the five, Thirst seemed a downer to me. I couldn't get into it. The lead girl was annoying. Port of Call is my favorite. His choice of a vaguely unattractive actress made my sympathy go deeper. The story is as much about the guy she meets, who makes that breathtakingly level-headed suggestion (decision) at the end is truly moving. It is so unlikely because he is portrayed earlier as somewhat brittle and insensitive to do that. He undergoes this great change and Bergman gives him an earlier scene to prove it. I love that film. To my chagrin, I've just read a synopsis of Crisis and can't seem to recall it. That was one of the five, yes?

All this talk is reminding me of a movie. Help me out, here. An itinerant theatrical group (ever notice how Bergman likes this idea) is out of money. They pass by a city and visit a big theater looking for help. They want to borrow costumes, or something. The leader of the troop is a big man with a blustery, volatile manner and who has an attractive wife (girlfriend) who seems to take up with a thin, fastidious, and exceedingly clever young man who is connected with the city theater. His scenes with the girl are enjoyable. Name that movie, please! :D 

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1 minute ago, laffite said:

Of the five, Thirst seemed a downer to me. I couldn't get into it. The lead girl was annoying. Port of Call is my favorite. His choice of a vaguely unattractive actress made my sympathy go deeper. The story is as much about the guy she meets, who makes that breathtakingly level-headed suggestion (decision) at the end is truly moving. It is so unlikely because he is portrayed earlier as somewhat brittle and insensitive to do that. He undergoes this great change and Bergman gives him an earlier scene to prove it. I love that film. To my chagrin, I've just read a synopsis of Crisis and can't seem to recall it. That was one of the five, yes?

All this talk is reminding me of a movie. Help me out, here. An itinerant theatrical group (ever notice how Bergman likes this idea) is out of money. They pass by a city and look for help. They want to borrow costumes, or something. The leader of the troop is a big man with a blustery, volatile manner and who has an attractive wife (girlfriend) who seems to take up with a thin, fastidious, and exceedingly clever young man who is connected with the theater. His scenes with the girl are enjoyable. Name that movie, please! :D 

Sawdust & Tinsel (1953)?

https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0045848/?ref_=nv_sr_1?ref_=nv_sr_1

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MV5BMTY4ODI1NDQxMV5BMl5BanBnXkFtZTcwNTI0

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59 minutes ago, LawrenceA said:

Sawdust & Tinsel (1953)?

Yep. I looked it up and it says it was released in '56 and then terms it an early film. Surprise me because only a year earlier Smiles of a Summer Night came out and I value that as one of the more mature of the oeuvre. Just what divides the earlier "apprentice" movies and the so-called later headier masterpieces is a blurry line (for me). I think you and I have mentioned this before.

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NqnkXb7.jpg?1

In Sawdust and Tinsel, there is a threateningly charged scene where something might happen and just prior we get this cat in the room who seems to know something. A nice touch.

(Speaking of intelligent cats, in Mr and Mrs Smith, Robert Montgomery is at a restaurant trying to convince Carole Lombard to come back to him. For some reason there is a cat haunched on the table. Leaving aside the incongruity, the two are discussing whether or not the food is good at the restaurant. Montgomey looks at the cat and says, "That cat knows something.")

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Now for Directors #21-30

Hawks (Red River [709], Only Angels Have Wings, His Girl Friday)

Lang (M [30], The Testament of Dr. Mabuse, Ministry of Fear)

Truffaut (The 400 Blows [5], Stolen Kisses, Love on the Run, Bed and Board, Jules and Jim, Shoot the Piano Player, The Last Metro, The Soft Skin, Day for Night)

Eisenstein (Alexander Nevsky [86], Ivan the Terrible)

Spielberg  nothing

Mizoguchi (Ugetsu [309], Sansho the Bailiff, The Life of Oharu, The Story of the Last Chrysanthemum, A Story form Chikimatsu)

Rossellini (The Flowers of Saint Francis [293], The Taking of Power by Louis XIV, Il Generale Della Rovere, Rome: Open City, Paisan, Germany, Year Zero, Stromboli, Europa 51, Journey to Italy)

Lynch (Eraserhead [725], Mulholland Dr, Twin Peaks: Fire Walk with Me, Blue Velvet)

Allen  nothing

Visconti (The Leopard [235], White Nights, Senso, Death in Venice)

 

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