cigarjoe

Once Upon A Time In... Hollywood (2019)

69 posts in this topic

9 hours ago, sewhite2000 said:

I tried to only vaguely allude to plot elements, but if you don't want even vague allusions of spoilers, don't read!

I'd avoided the threads discussing this movie until I saw it for fear people might be discussing the ending. Dargo, did your wife make it through the movie okay? Because it took a while, but we did finally get to the stereotypical Tarantino extreme violence. The final act shouldn't come as a total surprise for anyone who's seen the way Tarantino has played with reality before in Ingolorous Basterds and Django Unchained, but you know, given the subject matter, I certainly went in assuming it was all heading in one preordained direction, and Tarantino knew what those audience expectations were and completely subverted them! And so, while there is extreme violence, it is to some extent cathartic and righteous, given the way we were assuming it was all going to turn out. I'm reading that audiences are typically laughing during this scene, which happened at my screening also.

Just so we don't feel too cozy about these characters, Tarantino also surprises us with a very dark twist about the past of Brad Pitt's character I certainly wasn't expecting!

In reply to sewhite's above post, I'll now reiterate his statement: If you don't want even vague allusions of spoilers, don't read!

Yes, despite her general abhorrence of cinematic violence, my wife made it through the climatic violent scenes in this film quite okay, and I'd say exactly for the reasons and wordage you used here sewhite..."cathartic and righteous". I'll now add another phrase to this which might also be fitting in this regard..."poetic justice", and which I'm sure you'll understand now that you've watched this film.

As I walked out of the theater after the movie ended, I also thought how fitting Tarantino's selection of his movie's title is, as its title conjures up the appropriateness of its "fairy tale" ending.

 

 

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Once Upon A Time in Hollywood earned another $20 million in its second weekend, taking a better-than-hoped 51% drop from its $41 million debut. That’s a terrific 3.5x weekend multiplier from its $5.66 million Friday and gives Sony’s $90 million Quentin Tarantino film a $78.8 million ten-day total. 

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On 8/3/2019 at 6:15 AM, TikiSoo said:

Really? that's interesting. I bought one for $1500 a little over 20 years ago as a gift. Not working, but body was in great shape. The guy called the color Chevy "Larkspur Blue". I thought it was the most common car in the most common color which is why it was so cheap.

The person I gave it to was a fellow restorer so it was like an "investment" gift.

The '57 Chevy Bel Air 2-dr hard top has always been considered a classic car and it doesn't surprise me that it's going for the big bucks.

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On 8/4/2019 at 1:28 AM, sewhite2000 said:

I certainly went in assuming it was all heading in one preordained direction, and Tarantino knew what those audience expectations were and completely subverted them! And so, while there is extreme violence, it is to some extent cathartic and righteous, given the way we were assuming it was all going to turn out.

****SPOILERS*****

Yes, considering the subject and a certain character/real life person's fate I definitely expected a different ending.  I found myself looking at my watch anticipating and readying myself for that expected ending.  It was a relief (as I was watching it) when I realized that it was going a different way.  It was cathartic.  Tarantino did a nice job of establishing Pitt's credentials to being tough enough and cool enough to handle that situation.  (Training his dog, the Bruce Lee scene, ex-military, the rumor about his wife's demise,...)  After Pitt's character is gone and the dog is inside, I found it quite eerie to see the next door neighbor's gate open and DiCaprio go up that driveway.   I was half expecting someone else to be hiding in the bushes, like a horror movie "gotcha."  

Looking back on that ending now, I'm not sure how I feel about it.  

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Spoilers

Sorta makes me wonder how the real life Mansonsites got past those gates that open up like the gates of Heaven for Rick (and possibly his career) in the final moments. I've never read any of the famous Manson books. Not a topic I really ever wanted to devote time to. So, I don't know if they climbed the gate or what.

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9 hours ago, sewhite2000 said:

Sorta makes me wonder how the real life Mansonsites got past those gates

according to Susan Atkins, they avoided the high metal gates and picked a spot in the fence and climbed over one at a time. 

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3 hours ago, Det Jim McLeod said:

according to Susan Atkins, they avoided the high metal gates and picked a spot in the fence and climbed over one at a time. 

*****SPOILER ALERT*****DO NOT READ IF YOU HAVEN'T ALREADY SEE THIS FILM*****

 

Your post here Jim reminds me of another little bit of the actual history of this crime that Tarantino used in his film but then puts his own spin on it.

The part where Linda Kasabian, who ultimately would become the prosecution's star witness, tells the three other Manson family members as they walk up the driveway that she left her knife in the car and is going back to retrieve it, but then speeds off in the car leaving the others behind.

(...as you probably know, in actuality Kasabian did not drive off but stayed and witnessed some of the killings, although not participating in them) 

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OK, so far, the "spoiling" comes in the form of letting me in on that the movie is yet ANOTHER rehash of the Tate-LaBianca murders. 

Now, this might interest me only if Tarantino actually thought he found a MANSON portrayer AS GOOD AS STEVE RAILSBACK!   ;)

Sepiatone

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7 minutes ago, Sepiatone said:

OK, so far, the "spoiling" comes in the form of letting me in on that the movie is yet ANOTHER rehash of the Tate-LaBianca murders. 

OK with that thought in mind go see it now!!!!

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31 minutes ago, cigarjoe said:

OK with that thought in mind go see it now!!!!

Exactly!

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15 hours ago, Sepiatone said:

OK, so far, the "spoiling" comes in the form of letting me in on that the movie is yet ANOTHER rehash of the Tate-LaBianca murders. 

It appears I have hidden what actually happens in the movie successfully enough that you still have zero clue.

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One thing I think that should be addressed. One scene in the movie has proved controversial. A scene where Brad Pitt's character won a karate battle against Bruce Lee has struck many as implausible. But, and it didn't hit me until I saw people discussing this new film in relation to some 1969 films, its actually a sly backhand nod to 1969's Marlowe. As a member on that other site correctly posted, James Garner won the battle against Lee in that film.

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1 hour ago, CinemaInternational said:

One thing I think that should be addressed. One scene in the movie has proved controversial. A scene where Brad Pitt's character won a karate battle against Bruce Lee has struck many as implausible. But, and it didn't hit me until I saw people discussing this new film in relation to some 1969 films, its actually a sly backhand nod to 1969's Marlowe. As a member on that other site correctly posted, James Garner won the battle against Lee in that film.

Slight correction here, CI.

Pitt's character Cliff does NOT "win" the fight he has with the Bruce Lee character.

If you recall, the deal made between them before it starts was a "best two-out-of-three takedown", and after both on them hit the ground (though admittedly Lee's takedown was a heck of a lot harder and more dramatic than was Cliff's...oh that poor ol' Lincoln Continental), the fight was ended before a third takedown ensured and after the character played by Kurt Russell's wife (no no, not Goldie...btw, those two STILL aren't married, are they???...but I digress  ;) ) walks out of the building and sees what is taking place and stops the fight.

And btw, the only "controversy" regarding all this that I know of was the recent report that Bruce Lee's daughter took umbrage to how her father was portrayed as being somewhat of a braggart.

(...interesting point though about the Marlowe flick reference...gotta say though that the manner in which Lee loses to Garner on that highrise's ledge has always struck me as being pretty darn implausible...I mean REALLY?!...Lee is actually gonna jump feet-first toward the edge of that ledge at Garner, and all Garner has to do is move out of the way so Lee falls to his death?...REALLY?!) 

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On 8/7/2019 at 4:39 PM, Dargo said:

.btw, those two STILL aren't married, are they???

Hate to be one to break this to you, Darg, but not only are they still not married, but they broke up about three years ago.

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On 7/26/2019 at 7:22 PM, cigarjoe said:

Might as well start a formal separate thread for this.

Written & Directed by Quentin Tarantino. Cinematography by Robert Richardson. Starring....

Leonardo DiCaprio as Rick Dalton:
An actor who starred in the television Western series Bounty Law from 1958 to 1963, based on Wanted Dead or Alive (1958–1961). His attempt to transition to film failed and in 1969 he is struggling, doing guest roles on other people's programs while contemplating moving to Italy, which has become a hotbed for low-budget Westerns. Dalton's relationship with Cliff Booth is based on that of actor Burt Reynolds and his long time stunt double Hal Needham.

Brad Pitt as Cliff Booth:
A Vietnam War veteran and Rick's longtime stunt double and best friend. Tarantino and Pitt modeled Booth after Billy Jack, a character portrayed in four films by actor Tom Laughlin.

Margot Robbie as Sharon Tate:
A pregnant actress married to director Roman Polanski and next door neighbor of Dalton. Robbie did not consult with Polanski in preparation for the role, but read his 1985 autobiography Roman by Polanski.

Emile Hirsch as Jay Sebring:
A Hollywood hairstylist and friend and ex-boyfriend of Tate.

Margaret Qualley as Pussycat:
A member of the "Manson Family" who catches Booth's interest. Based loosely on Kathryn Lutesinger who had the nickname "Kitty".

Timothy Olyphant as James Stacy:
An actor who co-starred on the TV western Lancer.

Austin Butler as Charles "Tex" Watson:
A central member of the "Manson Family", alongside four other members.

Dakota Fanning as Lynette "Squeaky" Fromme:
A member of the infamous "Manson Family" who obtained her nickname while living on George Spahn's ranch.

Bruce Dern as George Spahn:
An 80-year-old nearly blind man who rented his Los Angeles ranch out to be used as a location for Westerns. Charles Manson convinced Spahn to allow him and his followers to live on the ranch. In exchange for rent, Manson coerced his female followers into having sexual relations with the ranch owner, and serving as his seeing-eye guides. Burt Reynolds was initially cast in the role, but died before his scenes could be filmed.

Al Pacino as Marvin Schwarzs:
A Hollywood producer and Dalton's agent.

Kurt Russell as Randy:
A stunt coordinator who also serves as the film's narrator.

Zoë Bell as Randy's wife, also a stunt coordinator.

Lorenza Izzo as Francesca Cappucci, an Italian film crew member and Dalton's eventual wife

Michael Madsen as the Sheriff on Bounty Law

Damian Lewis as Steve McQueen

Mike Moh as Bruce Lee

and many more...

Let the discussions begin.
 

Thank you so much for this great deep background information.

Can't think about the Manson gang without remembering an office I worked in, where a scam started and people would phone and ask for the Office Manager's name, and then hang up. Then they would call and if she was not in, they would ask assistants to give them the type of paper the copier used for their records, and then would send unwanted paper with a bill to be paid. So we were all told not to give them information, but how was one to know when the call for OM was legit or not. So I began telling people who said they only wanted the OM's name for their records, that it was Lynette Fromme. They'd always call back in a week or two saying they had talked to Lynette Fromme, but now needed our paper information and then I would have the fun of saying "Lynette Fromme? You mean, Squeaky Fromme, the member of the Manson Gang. I think she's in prison, isn't she, out in Tascadero" [how the heck do you spell that???] and there'd then be a giant silence. Saw Squeaky on that CNN special I think on the Manson women, recently and she seems to have lost her squeak. Sorry for co-opting your fab thread, CigarJoe!

 

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On 8/4/2019 at 12:04 PM, Dargo said:

In reply to sewhite's above post, I'll now reiterate his statement: If you don't want even vague allusions of spoilers, don't read!

Yes, despite her general abhorrence of cinematic violence, my wife made it through the climatic violent scenes in this film quite okay, and I'd say exactly for the reasons and wordage you used here sewhite..."cathartic and righteous". I'll now add another phrase to this which might also be fitting in this regard..."poetic justice", and which I'm sure you'll understand now that you've watched this film.

As I walked out of the theater after the movie ended, I also thought how fitting Tarantino's selection of his movie's title is, as its title conjures up the appropriateness of its "fairy tale" ending.

 

 

Darg, "allusions" I don't want, some illusions might be nice, and delusions of grandeur are always welcome but Elysian Field stories would be the best contribution you could make.

If your wife liked it, then I bet I would like it. I mean, she does have good taste ya know.

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On 8/5/2019 at 4:31 PM, filmnoirguy said:

The '57 Chevy Bel Air 2-dr hard top has always been considered a classic car and it doesn't surprise me that it's going for the big bucks.

If you dig that classic car, you might like the Fanimation Urbanjet Fan, which comes in Baby Blue, Sonic Silver and Spicy Red, not maybe GM colors but dig the resemblance to the famous car!

https://www.enlightenmentmag.com/news/fanimation-urbanjet-line-with-festive-party

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I loved Once Upon a Time in Hollywood. Pitt and DiCaprio have great chemistry, and then there’s the electric dialogue of Tarantino. It’s also a love letter to Los Angeles, and the entertainment industry, at a time when Hollywood was going through profound changes.  And the ending was very satisfying.

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