JakeHolman

Scorsese’s ‘The Irishman’ to premiere at New York Film Fest

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are his films relevant in today's hollywood and film world ...

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One of the characters in this film is Tony Provenzano, played by Stephen Graham.  He was a friend of my father's.  Then again, so was Jimmy Hoffa.

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5 hours ago, JakeHolman said:

are his films relevant in today's hollywood and film world ...

Your question had me pondering what Martin had done lately, and not immediately remembering from my own head, I checked out imdb. His last film was Silence from three years ago. This was one of his Kundun-style sidetrips, about Portuguese Jesuit priests in Japan in the 1600s. Certainly an atypical Scorsese film, although Catholicism has always been one of his big themes. I heard it was quite good, but given the subject matter, it didn't do any box office at all.

His two films prior to that were Hugo and The Wolf of Wall Street, both of which did quite well and got multiple Oscar nominations. So, yeah, I'd say he's still relevant. Sounds like The Irishman is going to have only an extremely limited theatrical run, presumably strictly for Oscar consideration, and then will be a Netflix-only thing.

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Huh!

THE IRISHMAN starring two ITALIAN actors!  :D  And directed by........  :rolleyes:

Now.....THAT'S good acting!  ;) 

Sepiatone

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Well, you know, the history of the movies is littered with Swedish guys playing Chinese guys and Italians playing Native Americans and Brits playing Japanese. I just saw a quote from the guy who played The Mummy in the Brendan Fraser version, and he's a white South African, and he said well, I'd probably never get that part now. They'd hire a real Egyptian. We're really clamping down on this sort of cross-ethnic casting now, but I was sorta surprised to come on here where attitudes are generally pretty old school and find someone mocking an Italian-American playing an Irish-American. They're both European Catholics of similar skin tone.

I was wondering who was playing the Irishman of the title, so I looked at imdb, and it appears to be DeNiro.

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Now, DON'T make more of this than I actually intended( which was nothing, really).  ;) 

Sepiatone

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3 hours ago, sewhite2000 said:

I was wondering who was playing the Irishman of the title, so I looked at imdb, and it appears to be DeNiro.

Robert De Niro is 1/4 Irish, 1/4 Italian from his father's side, and Dutch, English, German and French on his mother's. 

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On 7/30/2019 at 3:59 AM, sewhite2000 said:

Your question had me pondering what Martin had done lately, and not immediately remembering from my own head, I checked out imdb. His last film was Silence from three years ago. This was one of his Kundun-style sidetrips, about Portuguese Jesuit priests in Japan in the 1600s. Certainly an atypical Scorsese film, although Catholicism has always been one of his big themes. I heard it was quite good, but given the subject matter, it didn't do any box office at all.

His two films prior to that were Hugo and The Wolf of Wall Street, both of which did quite well and got multiple Oscar nominations. So, yeah, I'd say he's still relevant. Sounds like The Irishman is going to have only an extremely limited theatrical run, presumably strictly for Oscar consideration, and then will be a Netflix-only thing.

Silence was a challenging film, and it truly got hamstrung at the time. It was a saga of faith and martyrdom and apostasy, one of the gravest of all sins in Catholicism. This came into play because a Japanese shogun ordered torture and ultimate death to anyone who did not deny their religion. And so the film showed people decapitated, crucified, drowned, burned. And the film showed how these challenges affected several priests who were stationed in Japan. It all built to an unexpected point, and then went beyond, showing consequences and an enigmatic final shot. I am Catholic, so it had a bit more impact than it might have had otherwise. Its strongly acted,  hauntingly shot, well directed and written, very thought-provoking, and leaves an unsettling feeling

it would have been a hard sell for many audiences anyway, but the release was a debacle. There was only one week where it was in over 1,000 theatres, and although the film was dog-eared from the beginning as an Oscar contender and received strong reviews, its production company kept it under wraps until only a week or two before release, and then gave all their attention to Fences and Arrival. It only received one Oscar nomination: Cinematography, and La La Land, a big hit, won that.

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On 7/29/2019 at 10:33 PM, JakeHolman said:

are his films relevant in today's hollywood and film world ...

though very early still, looking ahead the Oscar race seems to really be about this-(his peers have been dying to give marty that 2nd bd gold for years now0, Cats & 1917

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still cannot locate though it's official nation wide release date, any tips sports fans?

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On 7/31/2019 at 11:28 AM, LawrenceA said:

Robert De Niro is 1/4 Irish, 1/4 Italian from his father's side, and Dutch, English, German and French on his mother's. 

did you see where it's based somewhat on a true story on youtube?

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On 7/31/2019 at 6:06 PM, CinemaInternational said:

Silence was a challenging film, and it truly got hamstrung at the time. It was a saga of faith and martyrdom and apostasy, one of the gravest of all sins in Catholicism. This came into play because a Japanese shogun ordered torture and ultimate death to anyone who did not deny their religion. And so the film showed people decapitated, crucified, drowned, burned. And the film showed how these challenges affected several priests who were stationed in Japan. It all built to an unexpected point, and then went beyond, showing consequences and an enigmatic final shot. I am Catholic, so it had a bit more impact than it might have had otherwise. Its strongly acted,  hauntingly shot, well directed and written, very thought-provoking, and leaves an unsettling feeling

it would have been a hard sell for many audiences anyway, but the release was a debacle. There was only one week where it was in over 1,000 theatres, and although the film was dog-eared from the beginning as an Oscar contender and received strong reviews, its production company kept it under wraps until only a week or two before release, and then gave all their attention to Fences and Arrival. It only received one Oscar nomination: Cinematography, and La La Land, a big hit, won that.

good one pal,  and hate when so called moviefans pigeonhole him as only being a nyc gangster picture maker.  as you noted there has been  cut his teeth editing Woodstock, last waltz, alice doesn't live here anymore, kundun, age of innocence, huge, wolf of wall street, the aviator, 

 

On 7/31/2019 at 6:06 PM, CinemaInternational said:

Silence was a challenging film, and it truly got hamstrung at the time. It was a saga of faith and martyrdom and apostasy, one of the gravest of all sins in Catholicism. This came into play because a Japanese shogun ordered torture and ultimate death to anyone who did not deny their religion. And so the film showed people decapitated, crucified, drowned, burned. And the film showed how these challenges affected several priests who were stationed in Japan. It all built to an unexpected point, and then went beyond, showing consequences and an enigmatic final shot. I am Catholic, so it had a bit more impact than it might have had otherwise. Its strongly acted,  hauntingly shot, well directed and written, very thought-provoking, and leaves an unsettling feeling

it would have been a hard sell for many audiences anyway, but the release was a debacle. There was only one week where it was in over 1,000 theatres, and although the film was dog-eared from the beginning as an Oscar contender and received strong reviews, its production company kept it under wraps until only a week or two before release, and then gave all their attention to Fences and Arrival. It only received one Oscar nomination: Cinematography, and La La Land, a big hit, won that.

I meant for me to be replying to you though?

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On 7/31/2019 at 6:06 PM, CinemaInternational said:

Silence was a challenging film, and it truly got hamstrung at the time. It was a saga of faith and martyrdom and apostasy, one of the gravest of all sins in Catholicism. This came into play because a Japanese shogun ordered torture and ultimate death to anyone who did not deny their religion. And so the film showed people decapitated, crucified, drowned, burned. And the film showed how these challenges affected several priests who were stationed in Japan. It all built to an unexpected point, and then went beyond, showing consequences and an enigmatic final shot. I am Catholic, so it had a bit more impact than it might have had otherwise. Its strongly acted,  hauntingly shot, well directed and written, very thought-provoking, and leaves an unsettling feeling

it would have been a hard sell for many audiences anyway, but the release was a debacle. There was only one week where it was in over 1,000 theatres, and although the film was dog-eared from the beginning as an Oscar contender and received strong reviews, its production company kept it under wraps until only a week or two before release, and then gave all their attention to Fences and Arrival. It only received one Oscar nomination: Cinematography, and La La Land, a big hit, won that.

have you seen it yourself, I've not, very, very rare for one of his

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attempted to post this, got deleted though.  I loath though when so called scorsese fans pigeonhole him as only being a big nyc mob filmmaker, he cut his teeth editing Woodstock, boxcar bertha-though a dud, alice doesn't live here anymore...  last waltz,  kundun,  hugo, the aviator, wolf of wall street, age of innocence-I kinda like to think of d. day's brother from gangs of new York, especially when both take place same era  1864 or so. and many more 

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trick trivia question; technically now and no phone's,etc please!   How many does this make between *Bobby De & *Scorsese?

 

& for more fun facts-(actually opinion)  my "Essential" *De Niro flix, as if a TCM GP limited to just 4 & of course still no *GFII?

1st Raging Bull (l980)

3rd fav date Taxi Driver (l976)

4th *The Deer Hunter (l978)

& 4th choice for meself as us Irish woulda say  GoodFellas (l990)-(NOTE: revised to #2 actually)

 

ABD; as for *Scorsese's finest works td>

1st R. Bull

2nd favorite of his td  GoodFellas

3rd Taxi Driver & of course less we forget the brilliantly constructed 1973 Mean Streets

 

& most pf his own personal favorite motion pictures>

The Searchers,Vertigo-(a toss up between these 2 for him, just after that massiv upset by S & S in 2012 by Vertigo over Kane, he told tmz Vertigo was his favorite), Duel in the Sun, The Heiress, The Red Shoes, Kane, Giant, Some Came Running, Abbott and Costello o

 

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*Waterfront(says it was first time he saw people like him & his friends at the movies), 

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On 7/29/2019 at 10:33 PM, JakeHolman said:

are his films relevant in today's hollywood and film world ...

no way jake, they used to care first about quality and if a release also made $dough$ that was the extra added bonus, now, it's all about the $$$$???

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Got interrupted by the site again, so felt it me duty to add *Marty's other all-time influences   8 & 1/2, 40 Guns, The Leopard,etc   & his movie idols were also John Cassavettes & Michael Powell=-(don't know about actors?)

 

(P.S. also a must see was A Conversation with Gregory peck)

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& as for 7 time nominee & two time AMPAS winner so far anyhow, *Bobby De, not certain about his fav. flix or stars?  Somewhat though 

 

(TRIVIA: who knew *spike lee always wrote Sal in his 1989 Do the Right Thing with *De Niro in mind & not eventual Oscar contender for it Danny Aiello?)

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