FItzMularkey

Films Which Are Considered Classics Which You Can't Stand.

165 posts in this topic

I guess it is good we are all different. Sometimes I watch a movie on TCM, knowing nothing about it, and enjoy it. I am auditory, so what goes on my ears matters. I have been known to listen to a program on TV from a different room, especially something I've experienced before.

(Doesn't work on Silent Sunday, except there are times when the music is incredible.)

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I can say that "Sound of Music" is the only Rodgers & Hammerstein musical-turned-movie of which I appreciate both the score and the story. I cannot stand "Oklahoma," "State Fair," and "South Pacific" (although I like certain songs from them, the plots do not interest me in the slightest). 

Something else I thought of: a lot of young people seem to think John Hughes is God, while the only films of his I truly care for are "Home Alone" and "Breakfast Club." There's only so many times I can see Molly Ringwald play essentially the same exact character over and over again. 

 

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1 hour ago, LawrenceA said:

The Unsinkable Molly Brown was a chore to sit through, for me. I didn't want to see Debbie Reynolds again for years afterward. Hello, Dolly and Oliver! were also pains, but they're not generally considered film "greats".

And Doctor Dolittle...🤮

Lawrence, back at it again with me lol 

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1 hour ago, LawrenceA said:

The Unsinkable Molly Brown was a chore to sit through, for me. I didn't want to see Debbie Reynolds again for years afterward. Hello, Dolly and Oliver! were also pains, but they're not generally considered film "greats".

And Doctor Dolittle...🤮

Although I will say, Lawrence, one thing I absolutely DETEST about "Oliver" was the decision to dub Mark Lester's singing voice with a teenage GIRL instead of getting one of the hundreds of other boys on the set to do it. It just sounds so strange and offputting. 

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Just now, NickAndNora34 said:

Although I will say, Lawrence, one thing I absolutely DETEST about "Oliver" was the decision to dub Mark Lester's singing voice with a teenage GIRL instead of getting one of the hundreds of other boys on the set to do it. It just sounds so strange and offputting. 

I found out about that even before I saw the film, and suffice it to say, it felt a bit strange while watching it.

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I was offended by the "humor" of Unfaithfully Yours and Divorce Italian Style. Alfie was sleazy and I really did not appreciate the contempt that the film had for its female characters. And A Clockwork Orange was not my cup of tea at all.

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Oh, darn, and I JUST posted in the Lion King thread...

As for the AFI 100, I can say off the top of my head that some Gone With the Wind fans like spending four hours chronicling the dysfunctional relationships of a spoiled brat--As for the others:

  • Vertigo - Yes, Jimmy Stewart, you can play creepy...Hooray for you and thank you, Alfred.  Now go back to your binoculars.
  • The Graduate - How pubescently angry would you have to be in the 60's to not find Mike Nichols and Buck Henry overbearingly decade-cornball?  (And that goes for Catch-22 and Man Who Fell to Earth, so there!)  It was the Laugh-In decade, and this was what passed for "Angry satire", before we discovered Subtlety.  For most of the movie, Anne Bancroft comes off as a complete psycho for throwing herself at a mumbling, zombified Dustin Hoffman, and we can't blame him for wanting to run out the door.
  • Mr. Smith Goes to Washington - Every time I see this movie, Jimmy Stewart makes me WANT to like it...But then, in come the Capra Orphans.
  • It's a Wonderful Life - Yes, it's fun to look at my old hometown. 😁  But you'd be better off showing "Duck Soup" to a suicidal case than this movie, and it would make more sense.
  • All About Eve - Thanks, but I'm hetero.
  • A Streetcar Named Desire - Thanks, Tennessee, but I'm...you know.
  • Titanic - I won't begrudge that the last half is Movie Epic, but oh, that first half...
  • Blade Runner - People have made better imitations/homages of the movie over the last thirty-five years, having been dazzled into the illusion that a Ridley Scott film had a coherent plot and dialogue.

These are all from personal experience, I don't make a big brick-throwing show of "symbolically" hating movies, like Larry with Mary Poppins...Oh, come on.  

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Lawrence of Arabia- Too long and the plot of the story is very uninteresting. 

Psycho- Don't know why , but I dislike this film. I may be in the minority, but this was not one of Hitchcock's finer pictures. 

Any of the Spaghetti Westerns- Bad acting and cheaply made.

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22 minutes ago, EricJ said:

Oh, darn, and I JUST posted in the Lion King thread...

As for the AFI 100, I can say off the top of my head that some Gone With the Wind fans like spending four hours chronicling the dysfunctional relationships of a spoiled brat--As for the others:

  • Vertigo - Yes, Jimmy Stewart, you can play creepy...Hooray for you and thank you, Alfred.  Now go back to your binoculars.
  • The Graduate - How pubescently angry would you have to be in the 60's to not find Mike Nichols and Buck Henry overbearingly decade-cornball?  (And that goes for Catch-22 and Man Who Fell to Earth, so there!)  It was the Laugh-In decade, and this was what passed for "Angry satire", before we discovered Subtlety.  For most of the movie, Anne Bancroft comes off as a complete psycho for throwing herself at a mumbling, zombified Dustin Hoffman, and we can't blame him for wanting to run out the door.
  • Mr. Smith Goes to Washington - Every time I see this movie, Jimmy Stewart makes me WANT to like it...But then, in come the Capra Orphans.
  • It's a Wonderful Life - Yes, it's fun to look at my old hometown. 😁  But you'd be better off showing "Duck Soup" to a suicidal case than this movie, and it would make more sense.
  • All About Eve - Thanks, but I'm hetero.
  • A Streetcar Named Desire - Thanks, Tennessee, but I'm...you know.
  • Titanic - I won't begrudge that the last half is Movie Epic, but oh, that first half...
  • Blade Runner - People have made better imitations/homages of the movie over the last thirty-five years, having been dazzled into the illusion that a Ridley Scott film had a coherent plot and dialogue.

These are all from personal experience, I don't make a big brick-throwing show of "symbolically" hating movies, like Larry with Mary Poppins...Oh, come on.  

this is the strangest list of films someone would dislike. Are you sure you actually watched and paid attention to them?????

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2 hours ago, NickAndNora34 said:

Something else I thought of: a lot of young people seem to think John Hughes is God, while the only films of his I truly care for are "Home Alone" and "Breakfast Club." There's only so many times I can see Molly Ringwald play essentially the same exact character over and over again. 

I come from the generation where we had to sit through his films in theaters, and "Bad, mercilessly-milked, miles-over-the-top in-your-face slapstick" and "Irritating high-school misogyny" is what springs to mind at the sacred holy utterance of John Hughes.  (Some remember Ferris Bueller, others remember "Weird Science".)  That said, "Planes, Trains & Automobiles" is the closest thing to a sentimental non-cartoon "normal" comedy he ever made, and still holds up.  

Watching Kevin Bacon in "She's Having a Baby", we also feel as if we're watching 45-yo. Hughes just on the very post-high-school twenty-something verge of trying to sort out and approach the wide, new, scary world of responsible Adulting, but...then Home Alone came along the next year, to take Hughes back to cartoon Neverland.  The road not traveled. 😢

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I'm another person who doesn't like Vertigo.

Movies that I think haven't been mentioned in this thread that I really dislike:

Gigi

Doctor Zhivago

Being There

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2 minutes ago, LawrenceA said:

I've heard from more people that hate/dislike that movie than those who liked it! I had to give out a few refunds when one of my fellow video store employees put it in their Employee Picks one month.

I couldn't complain, though, as I think they issued more refunds on stuff I put in that section than from any other employee. I may have even been partially responsible for having that section discontinued!

Well, Larry, I hope your days of recommending Dracula Vs. Frankenstein have been put on hold for a while. ;)

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2 hours ago, MusicalsGalore said:

Psycho- Don't know why , but I dislike this film. I may be in the minority, but this was not one of Hitchcock's finer pictures. 

Me too.  This would be one of the last Hitchcock movies I'd re-watch.  I can appreciate it but I don't need to see it again.  

2001 is another I'm not crazy about.  (Hal is the best part of the movie for me.)

I saw a Ben Mankiewicz interview where he said he disliked "The Adventures of Robin Hood"  which is funny considering how often TCM plays it.  (Not a movie I dislike, though.)

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4 hours ago, NickAndNora34 said:

I can say that "Sound of Music" is the only Rodgers & Hammerstein musical-turned-movie of which I appreciate both the score and the story. I cannot stand "Oklahoma," "State Fair," and "South Pacific" (although I like certain songs from them, the plots do not interest me in the slightest). 

Something else I thought of: a lot of young people seem to think John Hughes is God, while the only films of his I truly care for are "Home Alone" and "Breakfast Club." There's only so many times I can see Molly Ringwald play essentially the same exact character over and over again. 

I haven't seen Oklahoma or State Fair, but ugh South Pacific.  I love Mitzi Gaynor, but this movie just didn't do anything for me.  I do like "I'm Gonna Wash That Man Right Out of My Hair," and "Some Enchanted Evening." But ugh. This movie was so boring.  I think Joshua Logan's choice to use the colored filters also ruined the film for me.

I don't think that John Hughes is a god (though I'm not sure how "young" the young people are that you're talking about), but I love Sixteen Candles and Pretty in Pink.  I'm not the biggest fan of The Breakfast Club.  My favorite of Hughes' films though is Planes, Trains and Automobiles.  For whatever reason, I own Home Alone and always forget to watch it at Christmastime. 

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3 hours ago, EricJ said:
  • All About Eve - Thanks, but I'm hetero.
  • A Streetcar Named Desire - Thanks, Tennessee, but I'm...you know  

Really?!

For the love of god don't watch The Birdcage.

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5 hours ago, speedracer5 said:

...One of my favorite scenes is the very beginning of A Philadelphia Story when Cary Grant pushes Hepburn back into the house...

Not to get all PC, but I have always found that to be the worst scene in that film.  It's violent and disturbing and seems out of context with what comes later.  I just don't see C. K. Dexter Haven doing it, but perhaps that is through 2019 eyes.  Clearly he DID do something, or else Dinah wouldn't have been so hot for him to "sock her" again!

Now, that said, I like Vertigo.  Is it creepy as hell?  Yup, but that's the point, isn't it?

 

 

 

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3 hours ago, MusicalsGalore said:

Lawrence of Arabia- Too long and the plot of the story is very uninteresting. 

Psycho- Don't know why , but I dislike this film. I may be in the minority, but this was not one of Hitchcock's finer pictures. 

Any of the Spaghetti Westerns- Bad acting and cheaply made.

Agree on both counts.  LOA is just another David Lean wet dream.  Endless 'scope shots of nothing happening.

And the only scenes I like in Psycho are the opening bits before we ever encounter Norman.  It feels like a noir that went off the rails.  At the end of the day, it's nothing by exploitive...

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12 minutes ago, overeasy said:

Not to get all PC, but I have always found that to be the worst scene in that film.  It's violent and disturbing and seems out of context with what comes later.  I just don't see C. K. Dexter Haven doing it, but perhaps that is through 2019 eyes

I think it's the Michael Caine TCM tribute to Cary Grant where he credits the scene for being wonderfully funny as played by Grant but would have been all sorts of wrong in probably any other actor's hands. I've never been too crazy about that scene myself. I think for 1940 audiences, the fact that Grant appears at first to be about to punch her in the face then reconsiders and just pushes her was supposed to induce cathartic laughter like, "Oh, okay, that's a form of violence against women with which I'm totally comfortable!" I mean, she did break his golf club ...

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Well, it makes me sad that in 2019 that someone who feels the need to loudly profess his heterosexuality feels uncomfortable with watching films that might have as much as a slightly gay undercurrent, but I suppose that shouldn't surprise me in the era of Trump-inspired hate. We still have a loooong way to go, it appears.

It won't make you gay to watch a film that was written by a gay person. Really, it won't.

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8 minutes ago, sewhite2000 said:

Well, it makes me sad that in 2019 that someone who feels the need to loudly profess his heterosexuality feels uncomfortable with watching films that might have as much as a slightly gay undercurrent, but I suppose that shouldn't surprise me in the era of Trump-inspired hate. We still have a loooong way to go, it appears.

It won't make you gay to watch a film that was written by a gay person. Really, it won't.

Yikes! I've probably watched Victor/Victoria 100 times. I've locked lips with a blind girl. I didn't go blind and she didn't go sighted. It is kind of the same concept. People fear what they don't understand.

Funny, the hippies back in the 60s, "got it" better than we do now.

I agree 100% with you sewhite2000.

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1 hour ago, sewhite2000 said:

Well, it makes me sad that in 2019 that someone who feels the need to loudly profess his heterosexuality feels uncomfortable with watching films that might have as much as a slightly gay undercurrent, but I suppose that shouldn't surprise me in the era of Trump-inspired hate. We still have a loooong way to go, it appears.

It won't make you gay to watch a film that was written by a gay person. Really, it won't.

No, but it underlines the childishness, and mean-spirited pettiness that "Str8s" perceive in the community trying to form some tribalistic culture out of nothing--In the hopes of trying to market themselves into one, and goof and guffaw their own bigoted self-stereotypes in the belief they're "celebrating" them, rather than build bridges with anyone who still holds them.  A culture wants its cake, with big pink icing, and to eat their own "misunderstood persecution" for it too.

No, Bette Davis in All About Eve was never a "gay movie", but it's since been adopted as one, since Davis, her stylized acting, and the story's backstabbing/catfighting plot, seems to live up to one culture's bitterly misogynistic issues about their fantasy-perceptions of the opposite sex.  Those of us with fewer personal problems would like to appreciate the movie for what it is, without the pointed cheap-gag hooting from the balcony...And since I was only dissing it for its association with its "fans", that probably disqualifies it, and I should withdraw the question.   As for Tennessee Williams and Streetcar, well, that's hardly any secret there, but that doesn't make the character depictions of Blanche and Stanley any less grating or truer to life either.

I'm not the one who hijacked the thread, and I only wanted to wrap up the point--But only recently, I found out that "Grease" is now considered a, quote, "gay icon" movie, because the community sees it as a "hetero fantasy" of Greaser and T-Birds doin' it in the back seats at drive-in's...So, now, movies are, quote, "gay" for being "TOO straight"?  The rest of us will "mind our own danged business" when someone else learns how to first.

(And if I was on YouTube, I'd be in tears shouting "Leave 'Xanadu' alone!!! 😰"  😃 )

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2 hours ago, overeasy said:

Not to get all PC, but I have always found that to be the worst scene in that film.  It's violent and disturbing and seems out of context with what comes later.  I just don't see C. K. Dexter Haven doing it, but perhaps that is through 2019 eyes.  Clearly he DID do something, or else Dinah wouldn't have been so hot for him to "sock her" again!

Now, that said, I like Vertigo.  Is it creepy as hell?  Yup, but that's the point, isn't it?

 

 

 

Thank you Over. I first saw "The Philadelphia Story"  in the 1960s and I thought that was a horrible way to start a movie. So your trendy PC has nothing to do with how I felt about it.

I only saw Hitchcock's " Vertigo " after the reconstructed DVD in 2000. I thought I knew Hitchcock but I had no idea that he was that fabulous.

Over, I wonder what else you and I agree on. LOL

 

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4 hours ago, overeasy said:

Not to get all PC, but I have always found that to be the worst scene in that film.  It's violent and disturbing and seems out of context with what comes later.  I just don't see C. K. Dexter Haven doing it, but perhaps that is through 2019 eyes.  Clearly he DID do something, or else Dinah wouldn't have been so hot for him to "sock her" again!

I see what you are saying.  While the music does underscore the idea that it's supposed to be funny, I've always taken it as shorthand for the audience to understand how volatile their marriage was.  Dex also had a drinking problem.  I think the movie mentions how Tracy was good at pushing his buttons, pointing out his weaknesses.  They verbally spar.  I can imagine Tracy threw a few lamps.  It also contrasts her relationship with her fiancee.  In George Kittredge she's found someone safe and someone who idolizes her but the wrong man to marry.  At the end, you get the idea that Dex has changed his ways and Tracy has come off her pedestal to meet him.

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