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Stephen444

Disappointed to see the commentary by Woody Allen on TCM

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My wife told me that this commentary about Bergman films had been on but I had not seen it until tonight.  I would much rather see commentary by Mia Farrow.  Don't know if  she has ever been a host on TCM but I question TCM's judgement.  I don't appreciate nor am I interested in seeing Woody Allen.  

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Like it or not, Woody Allen is an expert on Bergman films. Berg man was one of his idols and I would have been disappointed if someone else had done it. If I didn't want to see some of the actors with questionable personal life, I wouldn't be able to watch anything on TCM.

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If Riefenstahl or Polanski had footage played as bumpers on TCM, I would not care. The channel bumpers are discussing movies, NOT condoning their personal lives or politics or any of that.

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59 minutes ago, megthered3p4 said:

Like it or not, Woody Allen is an expert on Bergman films. Berg man was one of his idols and I would have been disappointed if someone else had done it. If I didn't want to see some of the actors with questionable personal life, I wouldn't be able to watch anything on TCM.

In fact, his parodies of Bergman in Love and Death alone are more pure Bergman-expert than his entire "plagiarism" phase of the early-mid 80's, eg. "Interiors" and "A Midsummer Night's Sex Comedy".

("And his string.  He saved string...As you know."  "Yes...(pause)...I loved him for that.")

It's hard to NOT use Woody Allen and Ingmar Bergman in the same sentence.

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DISAPPOINTED TO SEE THE COMMENTARY BY WOODY ALLEN ON TCM 

How to begin... Anything involving the holocaust was bad including Riefenstahl's case. I'm sure children were probably involved. Lots of bad things happened then...

Right now, we have the BEST judicial system in the WORLD! Innocent until proven guilty.  A lot of other countries are guilty until guilty, even when there is a doubt. 

We have seen many cases in the recent past where people have been convicted as innocent even though they were not.  I'm not saying that the following names are guilty or not guilty, just listing them as examples... Robert Blake, Woody Allen, Michael Jackson, O.J. Simpson.

I have been a subscriber of TCM at least 20 of the 25 years it has been in service. I have never posted a comment, complaint or praise in those 20+ years. Tonight, I was totally compelled by the commentation by Woody Allen on TCM. It's totally okay if you disagree with me, but here is my point... 

Adults are responsible for being adults. Children can not be responsible for taking care of themselves. Yes, there are many children who have amazing abilities to make adult decisions. I don't feel that there should be a person by person, or child by child analysis of whether they are an adult or a child. 

I do not have any children, a conscience choice I made a long time ago. But mostly, children cannot be responsible for making adult decisions. That's why we must protect them. It is an indication of the level of our civilization. 

I love Michael Jackson's work, I am not saying he is guilty or innocent, but some people may call him guilty. He paid the ultimate price... the ultimate price is that he is no longer with us, and I will not further debate this issue. Riefenstahl's case, similar dismissal, it was before modern history, and new laws. O.J.Simpson, even though his children suffered, was not directly involved with harming them.

Roman Polanski... an amazing filmmaker. Is no longer allowed back in the country. The girl/woman he assaulted wants to fall off the paparazzi grid and have a "normal " life... I don't blame her.

My niece, is a brilliant student, top of her class, was taking college classes when she was 16. Not only greatly intelligent, but there is an additional amazing surprise here... Not only is she brilliant... She has really good common sense! She could be easily identified as an adult, even if people didn't know better. Plus she has a greater sense of responsibility than her adult relatives!

This is serious stuff people! Stop making it "OKAY"! Stop making it okay whether or not a guilty conviction is determined. We must protect children, because They can't protect themselves.

I understand if this article upsets some people. As it has taken me 20+ years as an avid fan to take one position in time to STRIKE OUT, and post my opinion about ONE subject, please know that you are welcome to post responses, but that I will not respond/reply any further. You will not change my position.

Don't stop showing Woody Allen films...

There are MANY great  producers/directors that LOVE Bergman films... find another commentator... Please.

Signed,

Hardcore TCM Fan

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The Woodman "borrowed" a lot more from the Bergman than the Farrowwoman ever did.

I caught part of it just by chance. The comments were just run of the mill Bergman stuff,

nothing very special. 

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Honestly, *expletive* Woody Allen, but the man knows his movies. 

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1 hour ago, Vautrin said:

The Woodman "borrowed" a lot more from the Bergman than the Farrowwoman ever did.

I caught part of it just by chance. The comments were just run of the mill Bergman stuff,

nothing very special. 

 I had to read "Wild Strawberries" in College English class and watch the movie.

This was the 70s and Bergman was really hot in inteligencia America. And Liv Ullmann was becoming hot with the general public.

Maybe you can refresh my memory, is " Love and Death " his Bergmanesque type movie?

I've liked okay the few Woody Allen movies that I've seen, but so many of them all seem to be very similar.

"Play It Again, Sam" is one of the few that I really enjoyed. Probably because at the time I had not yet seen "Casablanca". LOL

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4 hours ago, Princess of Tap said:

Maybe you can refresh my memory, is " Love and Death " his Bergmanesque type movie?

It's his Bergman-Chekov-Tolstoy-ish movie, only not in the sense of "Interiors", "Hannah & Her Sisters" and "Crimes & Misdemeanors".

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_QWjpfCjXSI

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Farrow was a celebrity picks (or whatever that show was that they've since abandoned) some years ago. She had some interesting picks (cant remember them now except a Bunuel film whose title escapes me).

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I agree with harterjean that we need to protect children, but we need to be careful to not "protect" them to the point of not recognizing or being able to deal with reality.  And really, I don't see how having Woody Allen do a commentary on TCM puts any children in danger.  Nor how too, it possibly endorses or enables his or anyone else's behavior.  You can(as my wife did) choose NOT to watch any Allen movies if it bothers you that much.  But at this point it seems the only thing Allen did wrong was p!ss off Mia Farrow.  And too at this point, there still isn't any concrete proof that the allegations against Allen have any merit.  And besides....

If you WANT to protect your children, then get proactive.  DON'T expect movie stars, TV stars, music artists and sports figures to raise your kids for you as "role models".  YOU'RE the only "role model" your kids should have. So get off your azz and pull your head out of it and let them know that stuff in movies, TV shows and what's heard in music recordings have NOTHING to do with real life. They might surprise you, like my daughter did(and I mentioned a couple of times in these forums) when we were watching THE COMPETITION when she was about 11 and expressed annoyance when the scene that had RICHARD DREYFUS and AMY IRVING rolling naked on his motel bed.  After registering a loud, disgusted sounding "TSK" she said, "It figures.  Every time a movie starts getting good they throw THIS stupid Stuff in it!"  :D  Me and her Mother figured if we made a big deal out of it, the whole thing might have become more interesting to her, as ALL "forbidden fruit" is to kids.  ;) 

Sepiatone(who has two daughters who didn't make him a Grandfather when they were 15. ;) )

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12 hours ago, Princess of Tap said:

Maybe you can refresh my memory, is " Love and Death " his Bergmanesque type movie?

It's one of them! More loving parody of Bergman, whereas I would say Interiors is straight-up imitation.

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I'm offended that they picked a guy that wasn't funny. I think most folks who find Woody funny are obligated by some comic pledge or something to find him funny or else they have to turn in their comedy membership card. He does lame Jewish humor that was later perfected by Jerry Seinfeld. If you get a kick out of Alan Sherman's Hello Mudda song you probably laugh at Woody.

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14 hours ago, Princess of Tap said:

 I had to read "Wild Strawberries" in College English class and watch the movie.

This was the 70s and Bergman was really hot in inteligencia America. And Liv Ullmann was becoming hot with the general public.

Maybe you can refresh my memory, is " Love and Death " his Bergmanesque type movie?

I've liked okay the few Woody Allen movies that I've seen, but so many of them all seem to be very similar.

"Play It Again, Sam" is one of the few that I really enjoyed. Probably because at the time I had not yet seen "Casablanca". LOL

I think Bergman started to be in vogue in the mid 1960s to mid 1970s. I remember a girl mentioning him during a college class like it was a big deal and I guess at the time it sort of was. Love and Death is just your basic Woody Allen 1970s comedy set in 19th century Russia instead of 20th century NYC, with a parody of 19th century Russia literature included. I haven't seen it in years, but it's not one of my favorite Allen films. I haven't seen any of his recent films, but there was a time when they seemed to revolve around the same types of big city intellectuals with relationship problems, nttawwt. To me Interiors was his first Bergman like film, so alike that it's unintentionally funny. Bergman's films are about universal themes, but I've always wondered would they come off the same if they were set in Acapulco instead of Sweden.  

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Not to change the subject, but did you watch Fear Thursday night?

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1 hour ago, Hibi said:

Not to change the subject, but did you watch Fear Thursday night?

Uh oh :). Yes I did see it, classic FTN. This land is my land, this land ain't your land. I'm sure that

older woman could be a pain, but to shoot her in the back of the head. And by the guy who was

only indirectly involved in the land dispute. I'm glad they put him away. I was hoping that there

would be a legal determination of the dispute because it wasn't clear where the boundaries were.

The death of the woman made that a moot point. I love the beginning narration of each episode,

Joe Blow hoped to start anew in the quiet and peaceful neighborhood of X. Then everything slowly

goes to hell. 

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You could see where it was going by the people who were being interviewed. (as opposed to those who weren't) I was shocked she got it in the back though. There have been several episodes over the years about disputed boundary claims. Never ends well!

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6 hours ago, Hibi said:

Farrow was a celebrity picks (or whatever that show was that they've since abandoned) some years ago. She had some interesting picks (cant remember them now except a Bunuel film whose title escapes me).

Guest Programmer. Over on the programs forum, they had a running list of all the programmers who picked films. Farrow was one of the earlier ones, so I was quickly able to find what she picked:

Quote

June 2006: Mia Farrow: Films Chosen: Rashomon (1950), The Exterminating Angel (1962), Fanny and Alexander (1982), Raging Bull (1980)

So, yes, one Bunuel, one Bergman, one Kurosawa, one Scorsese.

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2 hours ago, Vautrin said:

I think Bergman started to be in vogue in the mid 1960s to mid 1970s. I remember a girl mentioning him during a college class like it was a big deal and I guess at the time it sort of was. Love and Death is just your basic Woody Allen 1970s comedy set in 19th century Russia instead of 20th century NYC, with a parody of 19th century Russia literature included. I haven't seen it in years, but it's not one of my favorite Allen films. I haven't seen any of his recent films, but there was a time when they seemed to revolve around the same types of big city intellectuals with relationship problems, nttawwt. To me Interiors was his first Bergman like film, so alike that it's unintentionally funny. Bergman's films are about universal themes, but I've always wondered would they come off the same if they were set in Acapulco instead of Sweden.  

Characters in mid-late 70's, and even early 80's, serious Woody Allen films are always going to revival theaters, which only the intelligentsia in NYC were seen as going to at the time, apart from the college students--Allen grew up with local movie theaters, and the characters in his movies are constantly walking in and out of art-film screenings, like the numerous scenes in Annie Hall where Woody and Diane are in line discussing Marshall Macluhan.

Before the VHS age ('82 and after), foreign films were for the upper urban elite, while old-movie revivals were depicted in movie/TV shows as for poor naive dreamers who couldn't handle the modern world, spending their afternoons watching Fred Astaire, or Casablanca, like Woody's character in "Play It Again, Sam".  Going to a classic Bergman or Godard at the Metro 99th was seen as some indulgence of the upper class, before the rise of classic movies on home video later pretty much gutted the entire revival-theater industry out of existence, and forced Woody to admit VHS existed.

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1 hour ago, Hibi said:

You could see where it was going by the people who were being interviewed. (as opposed to those who weren't) I was shocked she got it in the back though. There have been several episodes over the years about disputed boundary claims. Never ends well!

Yes, after the half way point some people are obvious by their absence in the interview

sections, which gives one the idea they were probably the victim. Yes, boundary claims

often figure in the program, along with pets and kids loudly playing outdoors. I think the

older woman had lived there much longer than her neighbors and likely felt some

resentment when they claimed what she thought was her land as their own. I also get the

idea that some of these disputes last longer than they seem to in the show, so that things

are simmering over the years until someone blows their top.

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4 hours ago, EricJ said:

Characters in mid-late 70's, and even early 80's, serious Woody Allen films are always going to revival theaters, which only the intelligentsia in NYC were seen as going to at the time, apart from the college students--Allen grew up with local movie theaters, and the characters in his movies are constantly walking in and out of art-film screenings, like the numerous scenes in Annie Hall where Woody and Diane are in line discussing Marshall Macluhan.

Before the VHS age ('82 and after), foreign films were for the upper urban elite, while old-movie revivals were depicted in movie/TV shows as for poor naive dreamers who couldn't handle the modern world, spending their afternoons watching Fred Astaire, or Casablanca, like Woody's character in "Play It Again, Sam".  Going to a classic Bergman or Godard at the Metro 99th was seen as some indulgence of the upper class, before the rise of classic movies on home video later pretty much gutted the entire revival-theater industry out of existence, and forced Woody to admit VHS existed.

Yes, revival theaters, bookstores, auditing college classes, that's where you could find the typical Allen characters of that period. I remember going to revival houses in the early and mid 1970s and they showed both the studio era classics and the usual suspects foreign films--Bergman, Fellini, Truffaut, etc. At that time there weren't other options to see these films so one had to head out to the revival theaters or to MOMA. The former were usually short on amenities but that was just part of the experience. Not as convenient as popping a tape or disc into a machine but more enjoyable.

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