spence

Revisited CNN's THE MOVIES!!!

45 posts in this topic

I already wrote on cnn's & the very likely to take home a 3rd Best Actor Oscar as Mr Rogers in A Beautiful Day in he Neighborhood *Tom Hanks (l956-) epic 6pty series on THE MOVIES  It got better though & especially for us TCM-ITES it is currently covering HOLLYWOODS GOLDEN AGE-(1925-60)  Now I know you fellow bona fide classic cinema buffs will enjoy it the best & I of course agree

 

Who else has Demand on cable by the way?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

not one mention of the the father of film D.W. Griffith ... nor will rogers ...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
20 hours ago, JakeHolman said:

not one mention of the the father of film D.W. Griffith ... nor will rogers ...

Of course not. CNN follows their own pattern of denial, especially if the subject has anything remotely to do with race.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Did the series even cover anything from before the fifties? I don't think any silent films were covered in the series at all.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Why would they mention D. W. Griffith when the series didn't deal with silents?

I was disappointed by the series finale which dealt with the movies from the beginning of the talkies to the end of the '50s. With three decades covered in just two hours (with countless commercials) there were a ton of omissions, selecting their idea of highlights during that period of time (in other words the few films and stars of that era that still get a degree of discussion today).

When it came to the '50s I could pretty well predict most of their topics for selection, including Sunset Boulevard, Singin in the Rain, Ben Hur. All About Eve, the Method actors and Marilyn Monroe. They also deal, briefly, with the impact of the Red scare upon Hollywood (relating it to Carl Foreman and his writing of High Noon).

Biggest surprise omission from the '50s: any reference to Audrey Hepburn, an icon today pretty much on a par with Monroe. I didn't see the series when they had their tribute to the '60s - I wonder if they dealt with Hepburn then (ie Breakfast at Tiffanys and My Fair Lady)?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
23 minutes ago, TomJH said:

Why would they mention D. W. Griffith when the series didn't deal with silents?

I was disappointed by the series finale which dealt with the movies from the beginning of the talkies to the end of the '50s. With three decades covered in just two hours (with countless commercials) there were a ton of omissions, selecting their idea of highlights during that period of time (in other words the few films and stars of that era that still get a degree of discussion today).

When it came to the '50s I could pretty well predict most of their topics for selection, including Sunset Boulevard, All About Eve, the Method actors and Marilyn Monroe. They also deal, briefly, with the impact of the Red scare upon Hollywood (relating it to Carl Foreman and his writing of High Noon).

Biggest surprise omission from the '50s: any reference to Audrey Hepburn, an icon today pretty much on a par with Monroe. I didn't see the series when they had their tribute to the '60s - I wonder if they dealt with Hepburn then (ie Breakfast at Tiffanys and My Fair Lady)?

Audrey was big box office then. She was on par with Sophia Loren or Doris Day. And just like those two, she had her pick of leading men, which of course always included Cary Grant. Audrey also co-starred with Humphrey Bogart, William Holden, and James Garner.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
53 minutes ago, TomJH said:

Biggest surprise omission from the '50s: any reference to Audrey Hepburn, an icon today pretty much on a par with Monroe. I didn't see the series when they had their tribute to the '60s - I wonder if they dealt with Hepburn then (ie Breakfast at Tiffanys and My Fair Lady)?

That is a big surprise especially since the 'pop-up' on the CNN website that was advertising this special showed only one actress and that was Audrey as Holly Golightly.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

I bet they didn't even talk about Song of the South, either. What's the world coming to?

The only '40s films they discussed with a little more depth were Citizen Kane, Casablanca, Best Years of Our Lives and It's A Wonderful Life. They discussed film noir for a few minutes. Again, the channel really just hit on the films from that decade that modern audiences may have heard of. Major films missing from the '30s included City Lights (even though the introduction for the series included an image from it) and Modern Times. Chaplin's Great Dictator did get discussed, however.

But missing from their clips were Cagney (outside of a couple of seconds from Public Enemy in which his name isn't mentioned), Flynn, Power, W. C. Fields, Bob Hope, Abbott and Costello, Laurel and Hardy, etc., etc..

Bing Crosby may be seen as representative of what CNN deemed worthy (or not) of discussion in the series. During the '30s and, particularly, '40s few stars were bigger in the movies (he was the No. 1 Box Office Star of the '40s). Today, however, relatively few discuss Crosby and his films are generally dismissed. As a result of this, CNN did not make a single reference to Bing, even though there was no star more popular than him during the '40s.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, fxreyman said:

Of course not. CNN follows their own pattern of denial, especially if the subject has anything remotely to do with race.

Uh,   as Tom asked:  Why would they mention D. W. Griffith when the series didn't deal with silents?

Looks like related to the series and no mention of Griffith,  if one was to ask 'where is the beef' there isn't any.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

it was disappointing to not see the silent movie era not given its due ... the silent movies era produced some of the most beautiful and significant movies ever made ... with stars who were loved and cherished by the fans of that time ...

that's the point ...

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, JakeHolman said:

it was disappointing to not see the silent movie era not given its due ... the silent movies era produced some of the most beautiful and significant movies ever made ... with stars who were loved and cherished by the fans of that time ...

that's the point ...

I agree. However, CNN (due to ratings?) seemed primarily interested in giving emphasis to the decades of movie making that would have the most interest for current viewers. Thus each of the decades from the '60s to the 2000s got a two hour presentation, the '30s to '50s were all squeezed into one two hour episode and the silents got nothing.

The series was kick started with films of the '80s. That is, I guess, the decade CNN assumed would have the most interest to their viewer demographics.

I only watched the series finale, with the three decades of movies (The Golden Era) squeezed together. Because so much of the great films and stars from that period were missing in this presentation (or, some in some cases, received cursory mention) I found it quite unsatisfactory.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think a brief clip from intolerance was shown for you Griffith enthusiasts

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I saw the episode on Studio era Hollywood. It's an okay doc if you have never seen any film from the era before but for most of us, it probably isn't as in depth as we would have liked. You can only discuss a certain amount in two hours anyway.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Also besides no silents, there were no foreign films either. The only ones I saw discussed were Hitchcock's early British films like the Lodger and Riefenstahl's Triumph of the Will.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 8/18/2019 at 11:36 PM, JakeHolman said:

not one mention of the the father of film D.W. Griffith ... nor will rogers ...

think the obviously (until the finale) tried to keep it contemporary for younger fans

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 minutes ago, spence said:

think the obviously (until the finale) tried to keep it contemporary for younger fans

A show like this has to be General and not specific in order to appeal to a mass audience. Plus you're talkin about a mass audience that has a very limited memory no matter what their age is. Plus you're talking about a cultural group of people who certainly align art with progress. Most of the people that I've talked to have an absolute negativity about black and white film. So I can imagine that most people would think a silent movie would be like wanting to drive a Model T instead of a new car. Why waste the time.

You have to go to the PBS, the BBC or some other type venue to get an in-depth documentary on Films. It's the kind of thing that TCM should be doing more often.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I saw every episode of this series except The 60s because my recorder recorded the news for some reason instead of this. It's an okay series if you are new to film in general it's a good guideline to start by. The last episode 'The Golden Age' was so rushed but that's what they get for putting three decades of movies in two hours. I would've liked to see separate episodes covering the 30s, 40s and 50s. Like others it was disappointing the silent era wasn't covered and the birth of Hollywood. Personally, I feel if they (the producers) wanted this series to be a little better film historians should've had a bigger part in this besides just being interviewed. Technically you can put 10 years of film in a 2 hour show but if you want to show other genres, actors, directors, etc. then there's no way, especially with so many commercial breaks. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 8/18/2019 at 11:36 PM, JakeHolman said:

not one mention of the the father of film D.W. Griffith ... nor will rogers ...

oops, steve,  think they did though briefly in the beginning of THE GOLDEN AGE, as you know Griffith has now been painted a rascist though

 

(TRIVIA: He passed away in the lobby of The Knickberbocker Hotel, where William (Fred Mertz) Frawleywalked outside in '66 & dropped dead on it's sidewalk, plus an art-director I think jumped to his/her death from the infamous place  Think it's still standing  But if I had my way & $diough$ I'd stay at the legendary Roosevelt Hotel. where you always see mankiewicz and others on top of and if a huge gathering place at Oscar time

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'll always recall a terrible story around 1946/47 with the epic The Buccaneer premiering & it was of course crowded & some cop pushed Griffith to the ground yelling Get 0ut of the Way 0ld Man  unquote

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, spence said:

oops, steve,  think they did though briefly in the beginning of THE GOLDEN AGE, as you know Griffith has now been painted a rascist though

 

(TRIVIA: He passed away in the lobby of The Knickberbocker Hotel, where William (Fred Mertz) Frawleywalked outside in '66 & dropped dead on it's sidewalk, plus an art-director I think jumped to his/her death from the infamous place  Think it's still standing  But if I had my way & $diough$ I'd stay at the legendary Roosevelt Hotel. where you always see mankiewicz and others on top of and if a huge gathering place at Oscar time

Irene Gibbons oh, great dress designer of the 30s 40s and 50s jumped to her death there. - Cedric Gibbons MGM art director was her brother-in-law.

Griffith funeral was paid for I Believe by Lillian Gish.

Griffith was a great cinematic pioneer and filmmaker. Unfortunately  he was a racist because he was a confederate who absolutely believed in white supremacy. The film Birth of a Nation is a good example of his racism.

In my film class we were taught The Birth of a Nation and all the racism around it.

However we were primarily taught that "Intolerance" was his greatest achievement in cinema.

My favorite Griffith movie has always been Orphans of the Storm-- featuring Lillian and Dorothy Gish and the back drop of the French Revolution.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, hutz said:

I think a brief clip from intolerance was shown for you Griffith enthusiasts

They did. I saw part of the finale, and it was definitely there.....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I saw part of this finale. I fully expected it to be mostly the old standbys and that is what it was, but, if anything, the thing that disturbed me most was that whenever they had a bit lengthier a film clip, they would flash the names of the leads in the scene, as if nobody knew who they would be if they didn't flash the names, a concession to people who don't watch many classics. I guess I could understand for maybe Joan Blondell but for Bette Davis, Joan Crawford, Fred Astaire, Ginger Rogers, Jimmy Stewart, Cary Grant, Clark Gable, Claudette Colbert, Vivien Leigh, Bela Lugosi, Katharine Hepburn, Judy Garland, and Greta Garbo as well? Kind of humiliating..... I think only John Wayne and maybe barbara Stanwyck were spared that.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, CinemaInternational said:

I saw part of this finale. I fully expected it to be mostly the old standbys and that is what it was, but, if anything, the thing that disturbed me most was that whenever they had a bit lengthier a film clip, they would flash the names of the leads in the scene, as if nobody knew who they would be if they didn't flash the names, a concession to people who don't watch many classics. I guess I could understand for maybe Joan Blondell but for Bette Davis, Joan Crawford, Fred Astaire, Ginger Rogers, Jimmy Stewart, Cary Grant, Clark Gable, Claudette Colbert, Vivien Leigh, Bela Lugosi, Katharine Hepburn, Judy Garland, and Greta Garbo as well? Kind of humiliating..... I think only John Wayne and maybe barbara Stanwyck were spared that.

I would be willing to bet a substantial amount of money that a great majority of people could not identify Barbara Stanwyck when shown a picture of her. A larger number might say they recognize the name, but wouldn't be able to name a movie she was in. 

It's highly likely that a majority of people under 25 could not identify John Wayne by picture, either.

  • Sad 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 minutes ago, CinemaInternational said:

I saw part of this finale. I fully expected it to be mostly the old standbys and that is what it was, but, if anything, the thing that disturbed me most was that whenever they had a bit lengthier a film clip, they would flash the names of the leads in the scene, as if nobody knew who they would be if they didn't flash the names, a concession to people who don't watch many classics. I guess I could understand for maybe Joan Blondell but for Bette Davis, Joan Crawford, Fred Astaire, Ginger Rogers, Jimmy Stewart, Cary Grant, Clark Gable, Claudette Colbert, Vivien Leigh, Bela Lugosi, Katharine Hepburn, Judy Garland, and Greta Garbo as well? Kind of humiliating..... I think only John Wayne and maybe barbara Stanwyck were spared that.

Did they do that for the clips in the other episodes? I only saw the Golden era episode.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

New Members:

Register Here

Learn more about the new message boards:

FAQ

Having problems?

Contact Us