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spauldingd

Cinemability: The Art of Inclusion

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The Documentary Genre forum is a bit of a ghost town so I thought posting here would get more notice. Just a heads up that this doc is playing tomorrow (Monday 9/23). The IBDB page lists about 65 cast members but I find no ranking which seems strange for a 2018 film. “An investigation into the way media portrayals impact the actual inclusion of people with disabilities in society.” is the description. TCM has programmed several films to go with the documentary for 9/23 and 9/30.

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I created a thread about this in the Friday Night Spotlight sub-forum.

Here are the films that have been included:

the 23rd of september

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cinemability: the art of inclusion (2018)
freaks (1932) with wallace ford
bride of frankenstein (1935) with boris karloff
the hunchback of notre dame (1939) with charles laughton
johnny belinda (1948) with jane wyman
the unknown (1927) with lon chaney

the 30th of september

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the best years of our lives (1946) with harold russell
cinemability: the art of inclusion (2018)
children of a lesser god (1986) with marlee matlin
the heart is a lonely hunter (1968) with alan arkin

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Just now, spauldingd said:

Thanks! It looks like the dates slipped a week from their earlier plans. 

You're right. Good catch! I will go back and fix the dates in my earlier post.

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I looked at the original monthly schedule I had.

Previously the Disability in the Movies series was scheduled for the 16th and 23rd. With an evening of Borderline Westerns on the 30th.

But they moved the westerns to the 16th, then re-scheduled the disability films for the 23rd and 30th.

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I remember a Superman TV episode way back in the 1960s, with a little girl in a wheelchair. While it happens on TV, seems more rare on the silver screen.

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What I think this will focus on is having characters with disabilities being portrayed by actors with those disabilities. I know of a couple recent examples with deaf actors playing deaf characters in movies. It’s a thorny topic in many ways. I think it’s a great aspiration for a film maker to do this as I doubt there are many parts available to a disabled actor depending on their situation.

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the superman episode from the 1950s 'superman in exile' has the best early atomic pile on TV I've ever seen.

really scary with the noise and the flame bursts coming outta them pipes. (control rods)

:)

Image result for superman in exile

Image result for superman in exile

Image result for superman in exile

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tonight 9-23 for                   DISABILITY IN THE MOVIES .....

8:00 PM (ET)
B/W - 97 m
 
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Synopsis:  looks at the broad range of Hollywood's treatment of the "other," placing depictions of disability within the context of the big and small screen's treatments of race, gender and sexual orientation. ...... . In addition, the documentary considers the stereotypes that have developed about people with disabilities on screen: the noble innocent, the bitter recluse, the sympathetic suicide. ......
 

DirJenni Gold

"CinemAbility is the most entertaining comprehensive history of disability in American film and television ever made." ......

see TCM article: http://www.tcm.com/tcmdb/title/2193794/CinemAbility-The-Art-of-Inclusion/articles.html

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I don't want to dump on this programming effort, nor on the guest commentator - because I think the subject of 'disability' is, in general, worthy of examination and discussion. However, in the context of fiction (and the literature and movies that derive therefrom) one has to be careful not to mistake the meaning of disability and/or the character who is disabled.

In the intro to THE HUNCHBACK OF NOTRE DAME (1939), the guest summarized that the characters ought to have shown greater compassion and empathy for Quasimodo, to recognize his humanity. Well, sure - but then what would the story be about? The whole purpose of Quasimodo in the plot is to reveal to the audience the defects of the other characters (or virtues) and their social milieu.

I'm not sure TCM or its programmers spent enough time preparing this one.

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6 minutes ago, Brrrcold said:

I don't want to dump on this programming effort, nor on the guest commentator - because I think the subject of 'disability' is, in general, worthy of examination and discussion. However, in the context of fiction (and the literature and movies that derive therefrom) one has to be careful not to mistake the meaning of disability and/or the character who is disabled.

In the intro to THE HUNCHBACK OF NOTRE DAME (1939), the guest summarized that the characters ought to have shown greater compassion and empathy for Quasimodo, to recognize his humanity. Well, sure - but then what would the story be about? The whole purpose of Quasimodo in the plot is to reveal to the audience the defects of the other characters (or virtues) and their social milieu.

I'm not sure TCM or its programmers spent enough time preparing this one.

In the documentary there was one man (cannot recall his name or even if he was disabled) who complained about nearly every film he mentioned. He really seemed to hate the Lon Chaney film "The Unknown" (which I love) objecting to the character having no arms and being crazy and vengeful. The Chaney character was originally not disabled, he had his arms amputated on purpose! So he was already crazy and vengeful even when he was able bodied. 

There was criticism of one my favorite films "Bride Of Frankenstein" I was shocked that is was directed at the blind hermit (O.P. Heggie) since he was the kindest character in the film. He was the only one who did not run screaming from The Monster and became his friend. The director of the doc said she did not like that he was portrayed as "all knowing", I disagree, it showed him as lonely, kind and very human not some magical blind wizard.

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I saw that intro, too, and that was a little weird. I think it was Ben who introduced the "all-knowing" concept, and the director just went with it. I couldn't help but think of Gene Hackman playing a parody of the same character almost 40 years later in Young Frankenstein and wonder if there's any discussion around these movies of the practice of poking fun at disabilities in movies. Which, what could they say but condemn it? I also thought about that guy who wrecks W.C. Fields' shop in It's a Gift, then goes out and walks into traffic. Would they say it's ever okay to laugh at this? 

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I'm surprised they didn't secure IT'S A SMALL WORLD 1950, a William Castle film that takes an honest look of life as a "little person"*- not exploitative at all.

*sorry I don't know the flavor of the month PC terminology

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15 hours ago, TikiSoo said:

I'm surprised they didn't secure IT'S A SMALL WORLD 1950, a William Castle film that takes an honest look of life as a "little person"*- not exploitative at all.

*sorry I don't know the flavor of the month PC terminology

I think the current phrase is "vertically challenged."

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It would have been nice if they had included: Even Dwarfs Started Small (1970) as it combines both mental and physical differences.

It is of dwarfs in an institution. They rebel but do not try to escape because they know that they would not be institutionalized if there was a place for them in the world.

I believe that the best description of the movie is contained in one of the reviews for it on IMDB.com: "This film isn't just depraved and misanthropic, it's depraved and misanthropic with heart." - Food

 

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5 hours ago, SansFin said:

It would have been nice if they had included: Even Dwarfs Started Small (1970) as it combines both mental and physical differences.

Pair it with They Might Be Giants.  (Well, it is about mental patients.)

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