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slaytonf

Gojira (1956) as therapy.

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I've talked about how I admire this movie for the themes it explores, the somber mood it creates, and the tragic ending with its joyless victory (http://forums.tcm.com/topic/127760-sympathy-for-the-monster/).  One thing I was oblivious to was the effect of this movie on Japanese audiences.  Needless to say, it must have been stunning, touching a very raw and unhealed nerve in the common psyche.  A large destructive force, radioactive, that lays waste to cities, destroys and maims people.  Ben Mankiewicz in his comments called the monster a metaphor for the atomic age, but I'm sure audiences saw something else in addition.  The association of the monster with the United States and it's defeat of Japan with nuclear weapons would be inescapable.  No nation enjoys the sharp sting of defeat.  It is akin to death, and desperate measures are resorted to for coping with the assault on self-worth.  The Viet Nam War is still problematic with us, and it didn't involve any devastation to our country or government.  Imagine the psychic wound the Japanese felt, a people and culture even more proud, if possible, than we are.  Perhaps there was morbid fascination with a subject matter that hewed so closely to painful matters.  But perhaps there was also a certain therapeutic effect, allowing people, if only metaphorically to achieve some sense of control over their world by defeating the monster, and doing it with a weapon of fearsome power that they willingly give up.

 

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27 minutes ago, hamradio said:

Is there some therapeutic movie in the works for Fukushima? 

Shin Godzilla (2016)

Godzilla_Resurgence_Theatrical_Poster.jp

"Inspiration for the film was drawn from the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster and the 2011 Tōhoku earthquake and tsunami."

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shin_Godzilla

 

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14 hours ago, slaytonf said:

I've talked about how I admire this movie for the themes it explores, the somber mood it creates, and the tragic ending with its joyless victory (http://forums.tcm.com/topic/127760-sympathy-for-the-monster/).  One thing I was oblivious to was the effect of this movie on Japanese audiences.  Needless to say, it must have been stunning, touching a very raw and unhealed nerve in the common psyche.  A large destructive force, radioactive, that lays waste to cities, destroys and maims people.  Ben Mankiewicz in his comments called the monster a metaphor for the atomic age, but I'm sure audiences saw something else in addition.  The association of the monster with the United States and it's defeat of Japan with nuclear weapons would be inescapable.  No nation enjoys the sharp sting of defeat.  It is akin to death, and desperate measures are resorted to for coping with the assault on self-worth.  The Viet Nam War is still problematic with us, and it didn't involve any devastation to our country or government.  Imagine the psychic wound the Japanese felt, a people and culture even more proud, if possible, than we are.  Perhaps there was morbid fascination with a subject matter that hewed so closely to painful matters.  But perhaps there was also a certain therapeutic effect, allowing people, if only metaphorically to achieve some sense of control over their world by defeating the monster, and doing it with a weapon of fearsome power that they willingly give up.

 

and yet having fought and killed each other in a great war has brought us closer in spirit to the great Japanese people. no longer enemies but now friends and allies and comrades in arms.

so often those we have fought later become our brothers.

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17 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

Shin Godzilla (2016)

"Inspiration for the film was drawn from the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster and the 2011 Tōhoku earthquake and tsunami."

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shin_Godzilla

And ended up as a rightwing sounding-board for Prime Minister Abe's attempts to revive Japan-can-say-no militarism and isolationism.  

In which Godzilla (we're told that he is, although he looks absolutely nothing like) literally sleeps through the middle third, so that defense ministers, Diet ministers, and the token rude/duplicitous Japanese-American pawn of the bad guys who ultimately chooses to show her loyalty to the honor of the Rising Sun by the last reel, can discuss more political UN/America paranoia about turning the JSDF's responsibility over to international forces.

(The "Evil American future-men" who wanted to destroy Japan's boom economy in Godzilla vs. King Ghidorah (1991) at least managed to be goofy about it...)

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11 hours ago, NipkowDisc said:

and yet having fought and killed each other in a great war has brought us closer in spirit to the great Japanese people. no longer enemies but now friends and allies and comrades in arms.

so often those we have fought later become our brothers.

'Long as we beat 'em.

There still is a strong strain in Japanese society which is militaristic, denying the horrors they visited on the Koreans, Chinese, and others, and honoring the war criminals we hanged.  But if individual people can be a confusing mass of contradictory elements, think what a nation of them would be.  

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On 10/5/2019 at 11:39 AM, NipkowDisc said:

and yet having fought and killed each other in a great war has brought us closer in spirit to the great Japanese people. no longer enemies but now friends and allies and comrades in arms.

so often those we have fought later become our brothers.

The Japanese did learn they were lied to, not only in their Emperor is NOT a God but we were not the savages their leaders taught them we were.  Must had really been a reality check.  Americans are forgiving, we help Japan after WWII and did not seek any form of retribution on the Germans, only their Nazi leaders (Nuremburg).

 

Even after WWI , Woodrow Wilson begged the European powers not to be hard on Germany but turned a deaf ear.  Their desire for vengeance (barbaric war reparations) backfired 7 ways to Sunday.

Speaking of how we treat kindly to those after a war, this is why zealots/extremist bent over backwards to derail our plans to help Iraq like how we treated Japan after the 2003 war (one which should had not started to begin with :angry:).

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13 hours ago, slaytonf said:

'Long as we beat 'em.

There still is a strong strain in Japanese society which is militaristic, denying the horrors they visited on the Koreans, Chinese, and others, and honoring the war criminals we hanged.  But if individual people can be a confusing mass of contradictory elements, think what a nation of them would be.  

https://www.japantimes.co.jp/news/2018/08/15/national/japanese-remember-fallen-pray-peaceful-future-wwii-anniversary/#.XZoUMtQrJgs

https://www.reuters.com/article/us-ww2-anniversary-japan/japan-emperor-expresses-deep-remorse-over-war-pm-sends-offering-to-shrine-idUSKBN1KZ2L3

Yasukuni Shrine

6545.jpg

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Japanese culture has long had a militaristic martial foundation. I once heard somebody on the radio say that WWII Japanese military leaders approached war as an abstract concept. it's like they expect everyone to understand that brutalities are a part of war like the bataan death march or corregidor.

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1 hour ago, NipkowDisc said:

Japanese culture has long had a militaristic martial foundation. I once heard somebody on the radio say that WWII Japanese military leaders approached war as an abstract concept. it's like they expect everyone to understand that brutalities are a part of war like the bataan death march or corregidor.

:P

 

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