rohanaka

A Walk on the Noir Side

3,042 posts in this topic

Well, I can?t believe I watched the NOIR thing? .ha.

 

 

HEY Frank Grimes! You did it,sir. You have officially initiated a NOIR NEWBIE! Ha. I felt SO bad the other day about missing all those movies that you told me about that I went hunting for them . And guess what? I FOUND one. The Narrow Margin is on YOUTUBE and I watched it LATE Friday night. (and I have the BLURRY EYES to show for it, ha. But what else is new?) ha.

 

I LOVED this movie. It was everything I imagine when I hear the words ?Film Noir?. Lots of ?shadows? in the background and the foreground, plenty of smoke, steam, and/or fog. People wearing trenchcoats and fedoras. And cigarettes hanging loosely out of everyone?s mouths as they deliver clever one liners, or as they pretend to read the newspaper while they secretly watch someone from afar. There were lots of ?gritty, hard talking? characters, dames (the glamorous and not so glamorous) shadowy figures lurking here and there. This is what I picture in my mind, and The Narrow Margin fits that mental image I have in every way.

 

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OH, and this movie had one MORE thing I think of when I think NOIR. It had an interesting plot twist or two as well. Boy, just when I thought I had things more or less figured out, everyone threw me for a loop and the whole thing took some intriguing turns that made the entire story just really a lot of fun. .

 

Now this is the second noir film I have seen in the last week, and I really enjoyed the other one too. (Ride the Pink Horse) That story is VERY different from TNM, but it still has many of the same elements I just mentioned. And that got me to thinking... (I know... scary aint it??? ha)

 

So tell me, my Noir-ish friends, WHAT makes a NOIR a NOIR? Is it the seedy characters and the shadows? Is it the ?dames and the hoods?? Is it the element of danger that must be faced by the various characters as the story plays out? Or the flawed hero looking for some sort of "peace of mind" or redemption? Or REVENGE?

 

What has to be present in a film to really qualify it as a NOIR? Inquiring minds wanna know. HA.

 

Now before I talk a little about The Narrow Margin, I want to say that I am not totally surprised that I found myself liking EITHER of the two Noirs that I watched this week. I DO like a good mystery and I am something of a ?crimeshow? junkie. I like my ?cop/detective? tv shows. So I am thinking I MAY have been missing out on some GOOD classic films by sidestepping some of the Noir chat around here. (though I know not ALL Noirs are ?cop? stories or even mysteries. But still, I think in my limited understanding of things, I believe many of them do have these sorts of elements to them, so I believe there may be many films out there that I have overlooked for too long, now.

 

Hence, my purpose in starting this thread.

 

I want to hear what you (and my other Noir loving friends here) have to say about these types of films. And you can all tell me about YOUR ideas about what makes a Noir a Noir.... and why they are so well LOVED around here.

 

And then maybe I can watch some of the films you folks suggest and we can have a chat now and then. (You know me, jabber, jabber, jabber. I am ALWAYS looking for an excuse to run off at the mouth, HA)

 

In the meantime, I wanted to take a moment and open this up with a couple of the things I REALLY liked the most about The Narrow Margin. First, there were some interesting characters (and character types as well) A hard nosed detective on an impossible mission, two very unusual women (though they really don't SEEM that hard to figure out, at first) Some classic bad guy thugs and sleasy businessmen. And then a really unusual guy on the train who ends up playing a LARGE part in the story... eventually. (no pun intended... ok yes.. yes it was) ha.

 

When I first started watching this movie, I just thought, ?Ok, this is a typical get the witness to the Grand Jury on time kinda film." (yadda , yadda, yadda.) Ha.

 

But boy, as it pressed on, things sort of took a turn. And I started to really wonder who some of these side characters were and did they REALLY fit in the story or were they just there for ?atmosphere?. And you know what? There was a purpose for almost each and every one of them once the story eventually unfolded. I LIKED that.

 

(*Mini spoiler:* I LOVED the twist toward the end w/ the two women being FAR different from what they were perceived throughout the majority of the film.)

 

Now I have to say.. on the whole, most of the acting in this film was just OK, but the CHARACTERS in the story were GREAT. And I also thought that although the plot sort of simmered slowly at the beginning, it began to pick up speed as that train rolled along. And then boy howdy, it REALLY started to run down the track. So in the end it was a MUCH better film than I was expecting.

 

And what about the FASHION? ha. I LOVED the "LOOK" these folks had goin' on. Even the clothes everyone wore had a certain ?NOIR feel? about them. The ladies all wear form fitting dresses (yes, I know it was the era for that, but still... ) And the men all have on suits and ties. (Even the lowest of the low armed thugs). Ha, but I gotta ask. If YOU were hired to tail someone, and if you wanted to keep a LOW profile, would you ever in a million years wear such a LOUD jacket as THIS one? Ha.

 

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Even way back in the 30?s and 40?s a coat like that had to just SCREAM ?bad guy? ha.

 

But as I already mentioned, sometimes in a Noir, looks can be deceiving. Early on we think we know all about this ?dame? just from our first glimpse of her.

 

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But later on, I learn things are not always what they seem in a Noir film. You can't always judge a book by it's cover.

 

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And I also thought I knew EVERYTHING about this gal too... but even someone who looks like HER might still have a secret.

 

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Another thing I really enjoyed about this film were some of the VERY creative camera shots that were REALLY well done and quite attention getting. And the story really surprised me too. The END of the film was a lot better than I would have thought given the ?stereotypical? cops being tailed by bad guys? beginning . To be honest I was not expecting it to ?twist? so much given the first few opening scenes.

 

Here a a few of my favorite shots from this movie. I just like the way they are lined up and the way the camera is place in certain scenes. Again, some of it is very creative:

 

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Well I will stop for now, but I just wanted to say THANKS , Mr. Grey, for introducing me to this film.

 

And PS: I hope you and some of the other more knowledgeable NOIR folks will stop in here from time to time to give me a shout out now and then and tell me all about some more of your Noir-ish faves and why you like them.

 

I am going to try to find a few more to check out myself, and WHO KNOWS?? I may surprise you. I might be more of a ?noir? kinda gal than we thought. Who?da thunk it? HA.

 

Thanks for letting me take a little Walk On The Noir Side.

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Hey, Ro!

 

I cannot read your words on The Narrow Margin, because I want to watch it first. I also can't answer you about what makes noir NOIR, because I don't know because I am a newbie like you. I just wanted to wish you luck here in this new thread, and tell you I'll be "on the road to find out" right along with you.

 

I'll be lurking in the shadows. :)

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Woweee, Miss Peacemaker this IS a happy surprise in Dark City! :D What a fantastic

read this "discovery" of the "noir side" is already. You have already grasped the strengths,

I think, of The Narrow Margin but also of what you'll find again and again in movies

of this style.

 

This should be exciting. I'm no expert at all on noir, so I'm sure I'll be learning right

along with you. It's good to have "fresh blood" here, ha!

 

The first thing that comes to my mind when I think of film noir is the most superficial

aspect: the look. When I see lots of night time shots, in an urban setting, including rain

soaked streets, flashing neon signs on dingy cafes and hotels, and most of all, LOTS

of creative, contrasty play with light-and-shadow (I mostly think noir is made up of black-and-

white films). These things seem to either represent what's going on inside some of the

characters, or present a hostile environment that is antagonistic to them. Which is a

silly way to say these movies look "dark" or "black" and treacherous.

 

The real experts will chime in I'm sure with what noir is really about right down to its

conflictive underpinnings (lots of psychological drama, too, in noir---which I find interesting).

 

I tend to like a mix of classic noir and "noir lite", ha:

 

Laura

On Dangerous Ground

The Reckless Moment

Ride the Pink Horse

The Blue Dahlia

This Gun for Hire

His Kind of Woman

Out of the Past

Johnny O'Clock

The Maltese Falcon

Impact

The Locket

The Clock

The Blue Gardenia

Too Late for Tears

The Damned Don't Cry

Daisy Kenyon

Where the Sidewalk Ends

 

These are a few of my favorite (noir) things....! :D I think you would find something

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> {quote:title=rohanaka wrote:}{quote}

> So tell me, my Noir-ish friends, WHAT makes a NOIR a NOIR? Is it the seedy characters and the shadows? Is it the dames and the hoods? Is it the element of danger that must be faced by the various characters as the story plays out? Or the flawed hero looking for some sort of "peace of mind" or redemption? Or REVENGE?

>

> What has to be present in a film to really qualify it as a NOIR? Inquiring minds wanna know. HA.

>

 

There's probably a lot of different definitions for what constitutes noir. Perhaps at its core is the intent to probe and examine the darkest aspects of the human mind, what can and does make people steal, cheat, kill, and things like that. The vast majority of noirs will include a criminal activity or at least an attempt to commit a crime. The look is one that goes hand-in-hand with the darkness of the themes; it is frequently, though not always, dark, grim, sometimes foggy.

 

Female characters are often out to get an edge over the male characters, or to take advantage of them in some way, some memorable femme fatales include Barbara Stanwyck in Double Indemnity, Jane Greer in Out of the Past and Ava Gardner in The Killers.

 

Since it is heavily influenced by German expressionism, it also has a lot of high-contrast photography and often a lot of shadows. The majority of noirs are in black-and-white, but there are some good noirs that were filmed in color. The heyday of American noir is generally believe to have extended from the early 40s to the late 50s. Some will even include an early 60s film like Blast of Silence.

 

Many of the best-known noirs were made at the major studios such as RKO, Fox, MGM and Columbia; however some noir fans think that the films noir that are most true to the spirit of noir are those which were made by the Poverty Row studios such as Monogram, Eagle-Lion, Republic, etc.

 

Congratulations on your newfound interest in film noir. May you enjoy it very much.

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Noir is like any other film genre, such as screwball comedies, women's films, the

monster movie, etc. Each has a particular set of characteristics that go to making

up the genre. The noir list is pretty well established and disseminated by now. A noir

probably doesn't have to include every characteristic element, and there are minor

disagreements over whether a particular film is a noir or not, but, for the most part,

the elements that make up noir are fairly obvious. After a while, listings of these

elements gets rather repetitive, but that's the way it works. As for what is or what isn't

a noir, I take my cue from the Supreme Court justice's comment about what is obscene:

I can't always describe it, but I know it when I see it.

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Now this is quite a nice surprise. I would have never expected you, Mrs. Black and

White, to start a thread about the grey world of film noir. Why do I have the feeling

this will always hang over my head while I'm hanging?

 

I'm gonna watch The Narrow Margin again and get back with you about the

film. It will most likely be on Monday.

 

What makes a "noir a noir"? With me, it can be as simple as dark look and dark

story. As the story goes, the French critics of Cahiers du cin?ma coined the term

after being surprised to see such dark pictures coming out of Hollywood after World

War II, because the Hollywood films they saw prior to the War were much different

fare. A change had occurred.

 

Other than the look and atmosphere of film noir, what attracts me most to the "genre"

is that many of the films play as male desires trapped within a nightmare. It's mostly

a masculine world of temptation. As I have said many times on this board, I also feel

films noir are morality tales. And, you could even say, they are male fairytales.

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> {quote:title=FrankGrimes wrote:}{quote}

> As the story goes, the French critics of Cahiers du cin?ma coined the term

> after being surprised to see such dark pictures coming out of Hollywood after World

> War II, because the Hollywood films they saw prior to the War were much different

> fare. A change had occurred.

 

The term definitely originated in France, but to the best of my knowledge, it wasn't coined by critics at Cahiers du cin?ma, but by Raymond Borde and Etienne Chaumeton in the book "A Panorama of American Film Noir" (1955).

 

According to the introduction to the English-language translation of "Panorama," Borde and Chaumeton "had a good term to apply to the films they admired. The adjective "noir" had long been used in France to describe the Gothic novel, and in the 1930s it was sometimes employed in descriptions of French "poetic realist" films such as Pep? le Moko (1937) and Le Jour se l?ve (1939)."

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What the hey...ROHANAKA? What the heck are you doing down these dark, rain-soaked streets. What's under that trenchcoat of yours Frank. Cut it out.

 

Welcome!! You've made a good start with "The Narrow Margin." Great movie. Oooh I love Marie Windsor with her bedroom eyes. (Ileana Douglas reminds me of her). So you ask:

 

"So tell me, my Noir-ish friends, WHAT makes a NOIR a NOIR? Is it

the seedy characters and the shadows? Is it the ?dames and the hoods??

Is it the element of danger that must be faced by the various characters as

the story plays out? Or the flawed hero looking for some sort of "peace of

mind" or redemption? Or REVENGE?"

 

I think you've hit on all the set points that are requisites in a film noir. It mostly takes place at night. A detective should be involved...murder is a must. People in the shadows. I hope you can catch "OUT OF THE PAST."

 

Your screencaps & comments on "The Narrow Margin" were wonderful. As a Noir Virgin I think you managed your first (second) time in this world great and you have a handle on describing it. What a good idea your thread is.

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Hello Friends..... thanks for stopping by, folks... and for some excellent replies and your kind comments too.

 

I will respond more soon, but in truth... I was up to an EMBARRASSINGLY late hour watching this movie last night..ha. I am NOT going to be able to keep my poor little brown eyes open much longer....

 

Just wanted to say thanks to those who have responded so far.... I am looking forward to hearing more from those of you who have said they are going to watch The Narrow Margin..... also.... thanks for the suggestions on additional movie titles from those who have posted some already....

 

I'll be checking them out and then I will have a WHOLE new "dark side" to my Wanna See list... ha.

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I just watched my recording of Narrow Margin from the latest TCM broadcast; I think in some ways this might be an ideal noir for someone who is just starting to get into the genre. It's certainly one of the best B-noirs from the 50s, with very good performances from some rather underrated actors, especially Charles McGraw as Sgt. Brown and the two leading ladies, Marie Windsor and Jacqueline White.

 

I'm not going to go too much into the twist near the end, except to say that I like it.

 

There's also some great camerawork inside the train, especially what look to me like some handheld shots (somewhat rare in those days, I think) in the train corridors, which must have taken quite a bit of rehearsal in order for them to pull them off so smoothly.

 

Another thing that's interesting to note is that not every scene in a noir will take place at night or in the dark; in fact, there's a few scenes in Narrow Margin shot in bright sunlight, at the train station where McGraw and White's characters first start getting to know one another (or at least, they think they know each other).

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I just looked at my post to you, Ro, and I noticed the last line I wrote got cut off...

what I meant to say is I think you might find something you would enjoy about

most of the titles on my list. :)

 

I wish TCM would show The Reckless Moment. I saw it on the big screen

the other day and it just wowed me all over again. It's Joan Bennett's BEST

acting performance ever and the whole thing just kept me on the edge of

my seat. But what got me really was James Mason---i usually don't feel

very moved emotionally by him but this time he had me BAWLING.

 

Oh, and you and Jackie need to see this movie because you both

have daughters. I would LOVE to know your takes on it.

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I just looked at my post to you, Ro, and I noticed the last line I wrote got cut off...

 

I had noticed that and just had not had the time yet to ask you to tell me the rest of what you said.. ha.

 

The Reckless Moment

 

Thanks for the tip, little missy. I am looking forward to finding several on your list... and consider this latest one you mentioned officially added. I LOVE to watch James Mason... if only to hear his "sighing" voice...ha.

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>

> The Reckless Moment

>

> Thanks for the tip, little missy. I am looking forward to finding several on your list... and consider this latest one you mentioned officially added. I LOVE to watch James Mason... if only to hear his "sighing" voice...ha.

 

Oh! Then you are really going to LURV him in this movie...he's extremely touching and

he plays an Irishman! :D

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you are really going to LURV him in this movie.

 

Woo Hoo... Mr. Mason... move to the head of the list... (don't tell the "Gloria lovers..ha)

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The Reckless Moment was directed by Max Ophuls, they've been showing a few of his movies on TCM recently but mostly the foreign-language ones. I do agree, it would be very nice if they could show this on TCM.

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Here's a link

 

Hey thanks, little lady. I LOVED the screencaps on that link.... and wow... I KNOW I have not seen that film, but I must have seen a conversation about it on here or something because I know I have seen that shot of Mason in the car next to (is it Bennet?) before.

 

You really have my curiousity snagged w/ this one.

 

And now... hmmm.... I THOUGHT I recalled someone GREY telling me that they would be back (maybe MONDAY night) to tell me their thoughts on The Narrow Margin... I may have to call in some armed thug in a cheesy plaid sportscoat to track him down and tail him.. ha.

 

PS... Ms Favell.... have you gotten a chance to watch it yet either????? I know you have been busy lately in Brunette Heaven so I am sure you have likely been too busy.... ha. When you do get a chance to watch I will look foward to hearing your thoughts on it...

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> {quote:title=rohanaka wrote:}{quote}

> Here's a link

>

> Hey thanks, little lady. I LOVED the screencaps on that link.... and wow... I KNOW I have not seen that film, but I must have seen a conversation about it on here or something because I know I have seen that shot of Mason in the car next to (is it Bennet?) before.

>

> You really have my curiousity snagged w/ this one.

>

 

Oh , I think you and Jackie would really enjoy it.

 

 

> And now... hmmm.... I THOUGHT I recalled someone GREY telling me that they would be back (maybe MONDAY night) to tell me their thoughts on The Narrow Margin... I may have to call in some armed thug in a cheesy plaid sportscoat to track him down and tail him.. ha.

>

 

hahahaha! make sure it's Dan Duryea and be sure you pay him well or he'll double cross

you. :P

 

nite nite, newbette-noirista.

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I haven't seen it yet... I am lagging behind the group.... if I wander too far off the beaten path, someone, probably that same Dan Duryea, is going to rub me out. I better stay away from dark alleys and seedy bars.....

 

nighty night, noirettes.

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The great thing about The Reckless Moment is that, even though it isn't available on DVD in the U.S., the UK version is fairly cheap - just around 6 pounds. It does, however, require that you have a multi-region player, of course...

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What's the score, Quiet Gal? -- HEY Frank Grimes! You did it,sir. You have

officially initiated a NOIR NEWBIE! Ha. I felt SO bad the other day about missing

all those movies that you told me about that I went hunting for them . And guess

what? I FOUND one. The Narrow Margin is on YOUTUBE and I watched it LATE

Friday night. (and I have the BLURRY EYES to show for it, ha. But what else is new?) ha.

 

I must say, I'm very impressed by your guilt-driven voyage. I'm glad you decided to seek

out a film noir because... I've been drowning in Ford and Wayne for months on end! It's

time I watch something good. :P:P

 

I LOVED this movie.

 

Terrific! I thought you may enjoy it because it is a fast-paced film with good tension. I also

figured you'd enjoy the twist. When I first watched it, I didn't see it coming.

 

It was everything I imagine when I hear the words ?Film Noir?. Lots of ?shadows? in

the background and the foreground, plenty of smoke, steam, and/or fog. People

wearing trenchcoats and fedoras. And cigarettes hanging loosely out of everyone?s

mouths as they deliver clever one liners, or as they pretend to read the newspaper

while they secretly watch someone from afar. There were lots of ?gritty, hard

talking? characters, dames (the glamorous and not so glamorous) shadowy

figures lurking here and there. This is what I picture in my mind, and The Narrow Margin

fits that mental image I have in every way.

 

Very good! I struggle to piece all of those little items together when describing any

kind of genre. You are right, The Narrow Margin has quite a few elements of film

noir that some may call cliche while others classic.

 

OH, and this movie had one MORE thing I think of when I think NOIR. It had an

interesting plot twist or two as well. Boy, just when I thought I had things more

or less figured out, everyone threw me for a loop and the whole thing took some

intriguing turns that made the entire story just really a lot of fun.

 

Exactly. I really enjoyed the little twist and turns in the film.

 

So tell me, my Noir-ish friends, WHAT makes a NOIR a NOIR? Is it the seedy

characters and the shadows? Is it the ?dames and the hoods?? Is it the element

of danger that must be faced by the various characters as the story plays out?

Or the flawed hero looking for some sort of "peace of mind" or redemption? Or

REVENGE?

 

It can be all of those things and sometimes all of those things in one film. I'm very big on

the dark look of film noir, but I also love the dark stories. I have often said, film noir is the

"Don't Do as Donny Does" of film. Many men wish to have money, power, and women

(sex). Film noir often features men seeking these desirables and they most often pay for

their foolish quests. But there are many films noir that have nothing to do with this, which

makes the "genre" all the more fascinating to me. A film noir such as Act of Violence

is a bit different than most and I think it's one you'd like.

 

What has to be present in a film to really qualify it as a NOIR? Inquiring minds wanna

know. HA.

 

I'd say dark look, dark story. At least one of the two.

 

Now before I talk a little about The Narrow Margin, I want to say that I am not totally

surprised that I found myself liking EITHER of the two Noirs that I watched this

week. I DO like a good mystery and I am something of a ?crimeshow? junkie. I like

my ?cop/detective? tv shows. So I am thinking I MAY have been missing out on

some GOOD classic films by sidestepping some of the Noir chat around

here. (though I know not ALL Noirs are ?cop? stories or even mysteries. But still, I think

in my limited understanding of things, I believe many of them do have these sorts

of elements to them, so I believe there may be many films out there that I have

overlooked for too long, now.

 

I believe you are right. I think you'd like quite a few films noir. But, eventually, you would

tire of it because it's a dark medium. You would end up craving the "light." There isn't

much romance or comedy to be found in film noir. The emotion in film noir tends to be

different than that of other genres. And, as I said before, it's mostly a male world. Westerns

are also masculine but the women in westerns are generally much different than

the women in film noir. You're not going to find too many Maureen O'Haras in film noir.

 

I want to hear what you (and my other Noir loving friends here) have to say about these

types of films. And you can all tell me about YOUR ideas about what makes a Noir

a Noir.... and why they are so well LOVED around here.

 

I actually don't believe film noir is loved on this board. There are a few diehards but that's

about it.

 

And then maybe I can watch some of the films you folks suggest and we can have

a chat now and then. (You know me, jabber, jabber, jabber. I am ALWAYS looking

for an excuse to run off at the mouth, HA)

 

:D Do you know what film noir I think you'd find fascinating? D.O.A.

 

In the meantime, I wanted to take a moment and open this up with a couple of the

things I REALLY liked the most about The Narrow Margin. First, there were some

interesting characters (and character types as well) A hard nosed detective on

an impossible mission, two very unusual women (though they really don't SEEM

that hard to figure out, at first) Some classic bad guy thugs and sleasy

businessmen. And then a really unusual guy on the train who ends up playing

a LARGE part in the story... eventually. (no pun intended... ok yes.. yes it was) ha.

 

You got it. The characters in the film are all interesting to me. Well, except the

boy. :P My favorite character is Densel (Peter Virgo). When he shows up, it gets

really serious.

 

When I first started watching this movie, I just thought, ?Ok, this is a typical get the

witness to the Grand Jury on time kinda film." (yadda , yadda, yadda.) Ha.

 

But boy, as it pressed on, things sort of took a turn. And I started to really wonder

who some of these side characters were and did they REALLY fit in the story or

were they just there for ?atmosphere?. And you know what? There was a purpose

for almost each and every one of them once the story eventually unfolded. I LIKED

that.

 

Precisely. And, believe it or not, there is a "western" feel to the film... even

High Noon. There is a showdown looming, and once the "Frank Miller" shows up,

we've got a serious situation.

 

(*Mini spoiler:* I LOVED the twist toward the end w/ the two women being FAR

different from what they were perceived throughout the majority of the film.)

 

I did, as well.

 

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Now I have to say.. on the whole, most of the acting in this film was just OK, but

the CHARACTERS in the story were GREAT.

 

That's fair enough. One thing I really like about film noir is that it allows someone like

Charles McGraw, who I really like, to be the lead. I was very taken by Jacqueline White

in the film. She's a doll. And Marie is always entertaining. She's a viper!

 

And I also thought that although the plot sort of simmered slowly at the beginning, it

began to pick up speed as that train rolled along. And then boy howdy, it REALLY

started to run down the track. So in the end it was a MUCH better film than I was

expecting.

 

You gotta love those 71-minute rides. If you are looking for another fast-paced film noir

that I think would be right up your alley, check out The Set-Up. I think you'd love it.

 

And what about the FASHION? ha. I LOVED the "LOOK" these folks had goin' on. Even

the clothes everyone wore had a certain ?NOIR feel? about them. The ladies all wear form

fitting dresses (yes, I know it was the era for that, but still... ) And the men all have on

suits and ties. (Even the lowest of the low armed thugs). Ha, but I gotta ask.

 

Ohhh, yes, I loved the fashion! :P

 

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If YOU were hired to tail someone, and if you wanted to keep a LOW profile, would

you ever in a million years wear such a LOUD jacket as THIS one? Ha.

 

Now that made me laugh! And don't forget your fur collars.

 

Another thing I really enjoyed about this film were some of the VERY creative

camera shots that were REALLY well done and quite attention getting.

 

Nice catch. And the shots you selected were excellent. The beginning of the film and

the end of the film had some very strong images. And the fight scene was very well done.

 

I am going to try to find a few more to check out myself, and WHO KNOWS?? I may

surprise you. I might be more of a ?noir? kinda gal than we thought. Who?da thunk it? HA.

 

I think it would be 30/70 with you (and Jackie). It will all depend on what the

focus of the story is. Scarlet Street would be a nice test for you (and Jackie). I can't

see you liking a film noir like Detour. I don't think you'd like something like

The Third Man, but Jackie loves it. Even some of the ones Miss G listed as her

favorites, I don't see you liking all that much, such as His Kind of Woman. I'm not

even sure you'd like Laura. But I can definitely see you liking

On Dangerous Ground.

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Hello O Great Grey Dude.... (ha, April I KNEW it would scare him up if I threatened to put a "tail" on him.. ha And I didn't even have to call old Dan ha.). :P

 

I've been drowning in Ford and Wayne for months on end!

 

NO sympathy, my friend. I think it is GOOD for us all to expand our horizons now and then... YOU need to step OUT of the shadows.... and well... I guess I need to step INTO them for a change..ha.

 

time I watch something good

 

Blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah... HA! :P

 

The Narrow Margin has quite a few elements of film

noir that some may call cliche while others classic.

 

I like how you said that. (cliche vs classic) I say that cliche WORKS when you are a CLASSIC. ha.

 

I have often said, film noir is the"Don't Do as Donny Does" of film. Many men wish to have money, power, and women(sex). Film noir often features men seeking these desirables and they most often pay for their foolish quests

 

I like the "Donny" line... very good. ha. And I think you are right (from a comment you mentioned earlier) I think there is a level of "morality play" in a lot of noir films (at least based on my limited understanding) As in: the wrong choice will work against you in the end. Not all noir stories likely fit this mold, but I think many of them might.

 

eventually, you would tire of it because it's a dark medium. You would end up craving the "light."

 

Well... I do like a "happy ending" w/ a lot of my movies.... but I really like a GOOD character study w/ a thought provoking plot more than just about anything (which is on reason I like a lot of the westerns that I do) And going back to our long drawn out (it is over a YEAR now..ha) ongoing "All things black/white/and gray... I mean GREY" conversation.... I think the biggest thing for me in a film is wanting to see people make up right decisions just because they are RIGHT. I DO like my good guys and my bad guys pretty well drawn for me.

 

But here is my BIG secret... ha. I am not really so "black and white" as I carry on about sometimes (at least when it comes to movies...ha) Because I DO also like a story where maybe someone did NOT choose well at the beginning... and then they end up making up for their past somehow in the end. (repentance is a wonderful thing and I LOVE movies that have that as a theme)And I also like stories that show the consequence that can come from making a bad choice too. And the struggles that are involved once that choice is made.

 

Those are maybe "tangents" that are PART of my black and white leanings.... but they are not necessarily so "black and white in and of themselves. Because lets face it... although I think most "right and wrong's" really ARE black and white.... I do not think most PEOPLE are. And we all choose poorly now and then. Some of us make a life out of it.. and that is when we end up on the "black" side of grey. Others seek to overcome their failings... and the whiter side of grey comes out. So to me.... Grey is most often the middle ground where people are either still CHOOSING or it is the much more narrow "ride the fence' territory where it really DOES seem there is not clear right or wrong) does that make sense??? ha.

 

But getting back to my "variety is the spice of movie watching" thoughts, ha... Another area (that is completely seperate from what I just mentioned above) that I also really enjoy, is a good pyschological thriller... I like getting into the mind of the monster sometimes to see what makes them tick... (as in Shadow of a Doubt and Night Must Fall.) and the process that all takes as the story plays out.

 

So all in all, I think it is good for me to be stepping into this new territory. I am looking forward to trying on a few Grey films for size.

 

Do you know what film noir I think you'd find fascinating? D.O.A.

 

That is one I have heard of but have never seen.. I will check it out.

 

My favorite character is Densel (Peter Virgo). When he shows up, it gets

really serious.

 

Now WHY am I not suprised, Mr. BLACK hat... ha.

 

And, believe it or not, there is a "western" feel to the film... even

High Noon. There is a showdown looming, and once the "Frank Miller" shows up,

we've got a serious situation.

 

I can see that. Maybe not completely, but I can see where you are going...

 

And I liked the screencap you posted where he asks the "dame and hood" question. He eventually gets his answer.. and I like how he changes his wording the next time he brings it up... ha. ("What kind of woman would marry a gangster?")

 

check out The Set-Up. I think you'd love it.

 

Yet another one to add to my check out list... ha.

 

Ohhh, yes, I loved the fashion! (picture me... rolling my eyes...ha. AGAIN, I am not surprised!) ha.

 

The beginning of the film and the end of the film had some very strong images. And the fight scene was very well done.

 

I loved that whole scene on the stairs at the beginning. When her necklace breaks and the beads go everywhere... including at the feet of the killer.... very intense. And you are right.. the fight scene was well done.

 

I think it would be 30/70 with you (and Jackie). It will all depend on what the

focus of the story is.

 

Hmmmm I can't answer for Jackie... but I am wondering if you are close on me...

 

Scarlet Street would be a nice test for you (and Jackie). I can't

see you liking a film noir like Detour.

 

Well we will find out because both of those are on my watch'em sometime list. ha. ( I have 3 categories... ha. Check it out, Watch'em sometime, and WANNA see list" ha.

 

I don't think you'd like something like The Third Man, but Jackie loves it.

 

WELL think again, because YOU ARE WRONG-O sir.. ha. I saw The Thrird Man a couple of months ago when TCM aired it... and I LOVED it..ha. VERY surprising movie... with PLENTY of twists and turns... one of my most favorite perfomances for WELLES ever... :P

 

Even some of the ones Miss G listed as her favorites, I don't see you liking all that much, such as His Kind of Woman. I'm not even sure you'd like Laura.

 

I have not seen HKOW so we will have to see about that one, but after I did some checking... I think I HAVE seen Laura.. but it was a VERY long time ago... so I need to watch it again to be sure... And PS: Miss G has NEVER steered me wrong... so I am gonna trust her. :-)

 

But I can definitely see you liking On Dangerous Ground.

 

It is way up on my list after all the recommendations it has been getting here.

 

This is turning into a fun chat... Thanks, Mr. Grey... for pushing me in to the Noir side of the pool... ha. I hope I dont' end up FACE DOWN!!! ha.

 

PS.... Jackie... NO one is going to "rub you out". We will save THAT for the rotten thug BAD dudes.. ha. But I can already tell I am going to have to "up" my arsenal a bit. I don't know how well my frozen rope and hat pin will work in the midst of all this grey!! ha.

 

Message was edited by: rohanaka

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I enjoy a good noir, and even an average noir (genre forbearance), but I've never taken

them very seriously. Noirs are somewhat more realistic than your average 1950s Techni

happy-ending musical, but not much. The noir is kind of a polar opposite of something

like musicals. Gritty, shadowy, bad characters, fatalistic, fast-talking. Many musicals

are just the opposite, and both genres are about the same distance from dull, everyday

life. In noir, the glass is half empty, in musicals half-full, but they're both just entertainment.

Dark fantasy, bright fantasy, take yer choice. A hustle here, a hustle there.

 

D.O.A. is one of my favorites. Poor little Paula, she'll never make it to the altar. Don't

forget the HornyHorn (though it doesn't sound like a horn) sound effect when Edmond

O'Brien's character checks into the SF hotel and finds out there's a convention going on.

Hilarious.

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But here is my BIG secret... ha. I am not really so "black and white" as I carry on about sometimes (at least when it comes to movies...ha) Because I DO also like a story where maybe someone did NOT choose well at the beginning... and then they end up making up for their past somehow in the end. (repentance is a wonderful thing and I LOVE movies that have that as a theme)And I also like stories that show the consequence that can come from making a bad choice too. And the struggles that are involved once that choice is made.

 

The James Mason character in The Reckless Moment (and also Geraldine Brooks)

fits this to a "T".

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