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JackFavell

For the holidays... Put on a Happy Face

49 posts in this topic

Bobby Darin had such an amazing voice, so smooth and fine and yet very conversational. I really love the tone of his voice.

 

I saw the movie and thought Kevin Spacey was great! I got the feeling he really had idolized Darin all along.

 

Here's Barbara Cook, another singer who has beautiful tone - I couldn't find any actual scenes from the stage version of The Music Man, but this is the next best thing.

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d0vggMCiJfs

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I loved his tone too. Bobby was a showman, and I am sorry he left too soon. He could've really enjoyed the reemergence of standards. He was getting out of his self-appointed exile when his life ended. He was even seeing Sandra again. So sad.

 

Thank you for the Barbara Cook! A clear tone, perfect for the stage. She does Meredith Wilson's music justice.

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I have this on CD... no wait, the ex has it... darn.. Anyway, Beyond the Sea was the "B" side of the first Bobby Darin hit, Mack the Knife. I know, it was the first 45rpm I bought, with birthday money I believe. I saw Bobby Darin sing it on *Hennessey*, a TV show from late fifties, early sixties.

 

The story goes, Mack received so much playtime, that the disc jockeys would just flip the record, since it was always so close to the turntable anyway. Beyond the Sea was just as big a hit!

 

Now we all know Bobby's version of Mack the Knife. Let me share an alternate version, Ernie Kovac's style:

 

 

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Hey! When I was a little girl, my dad had this reel to reel tape recorder - huge( the size of a small coffee table) and really old. He never used it any more because by this time they were making cassette tape recorders.

 

Anyway, he had all these musical shows recorded from before I was born - like one with Ella Fitzgerald and Julie Andrews, and another with Al Hirt that was so good - he played Carnival in Venice three times through. The first was normal, the second sped up and in the third he used a technique called triple tongueing. It was amazing!

 

My sister eventually got a cassette of all those recordings, which also had the Hennessey theme song! My dad got rid of the giant reel to reel and all his tapes. Unfortunately, years later, someone broke into sis's car and stole her cassette player with the tape inside and we never heard any of that great music again. I loved the Hennessey theme - it was very catchy and I think it was someone whistling? Or maybe a penny whistle tune?

 

BTW, I really like Ernie Kovacs.

 

Hey, I found just a piece of the music! Unfortunately, the beginning is chopped off...

 

http://www.sitcomsonline.com/sounds/hennesey.wav

 

Edited by: JackFavell on Jan 2, 2010 12:50 PM

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It is! That was the theme song! Abby Dalton was the beautiful nurse-assistant, and Roscoe Karns (hey has he been mentioned in Supporting Characters thread yet?) was the Commanding Officer/Chief of Staff. I think it took place in San Diego. The sponsor was Kent Cigarettes. Yup, "doctors" advertised cigarettes.

Here's Roscoe Karns in a scene from *It Happened One Night*:

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sDPK7FP9m_U

I think I like Gable best in comedy.

 

Thanks for sharing about your dad's tape deck --when they were the size of a deck!

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Yes, he did. Hirt also went to local high schools, talking with the kids, practicing with them and helping influence students to stay in school so they could participate in band class.

 

Unfortunately in 1970, someone threw a brick at him while he was riding on a float during Mardi Gras. It hit him square in the lip. He slowly taught himself to play the trumpet all over again, step by step and continued playing until the day he died.

 

He had 22 different albums on the billboard pop charts in the 50's and 60's.

 

He was also the one who played the theme from The Green Hornet TV show.

 

You might recognize this - I remember it clearly - playing in every five and dime we ever went into when I was a toddler.

 

Java:

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rcfCvsl47-A&feature=related

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OMG ! Of course. When I was in the 5 & 10 (Kresge's here in the Midwest), I don't remember music. The family-run drug store across the street had the better soda fountain. My older brothers would take me there often. And they had a Juke Box! It played this, but this isn't the exact recording.

*Moon River:*

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=68Y2AmcfI6o

 

Maybe it was a favorite of the druggist.

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That was played continuously during the summer, along with Summer Wind. Sorry, JF, I heard that one _too_ often (though I love Frankie of the 1940s-1950s) Now, it's Winter music. I posted my favorite for cold winter nights on Off Topic: Favorite Music. It's Gino Vanelli.

 

Speaking of Frank, Chairman of the Board:

 

 

 

I always think of this movie during the Holidays too...

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Oh what wonderful choices, cinemafan! I remember people on TV talking about Camelot, and I guess it was a Telephone Hour presentation or something like that. Tough ticket to get, I'm sure.

 

I was in London and had the sublime honor of hearing Colm Wilkenson singing in Les Miserables. A welsh baritone who can make you swoon with his voice...

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6PXZ1nLiUZo&feature=related

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bIwgD4I5UtQ&feature=related

 

Love the Moody Blues piece at Jake's as well. I'm off on a date now.. I'll catch you later..

 

Edited by: casablancalover on Jan 16, 2010 6:06 PM who was assured yes, it was Colm...

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Back early. Date was not great experience. Nothing to discuss other than the menu. Went to the ladies room to hide. Ordered wrong pasta too. What finished it off was Steve's comment that Haitians suffer because they're poor and that's what poor people do best. No sympathy at all. I apologized that I was not feeling well, (maybe the flu).. Since I did hide in the Ladies room, he thought he should take me back home. Didn't mention anything about calling. I hope he doesn't.

 

Had some chocolate ice cream when I got home, and now I feel better. I'll arrange a rescue call next time??? I don't know when I'll do that again.. yech. NO, next time it'll be a guy I know!!!

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cblover- thanks for sharing Colm Wilkenson here. I was not aware of him, he does indeed have a beautiful voice. As for your date - good luck in future - the only advice I can give is be yourself.

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Last night, I saw a special on PBS with Pat Boone showing clips from his '50s variety show. His guests included Ella Fitzgerald, Andy Williams, George Shearing and Nat King Cole. If it hasn't played in your area, be on the lookout for it. Lots of history and entertainment. They made it all look so easy and the consistency of their performances was astounding. That's real talent!! And all Live!

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q3rwVZIZA8k&feature=related

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Pat Boone was in the local PBS studio in my town for this one - he said that it will go to other cities.

Even if you are not a Pat Boone fan, the guests on his show made this memorable. Mr. Boone said that he kept all the (tapes/copies---whatever they are called) of all those shows. I got the impression that he has the only copies, which made it fun to watch. I sat and watched it with a smile on my face.

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I love *Jacques Brel*. His emotion may not be to everyone's taste, but I thought I would try posting this here.

 

This song that Brel wrote and performs, called *My Childhood* tells of his painful experiences growing up in Belgium. His childhood was unhappy, turning him into a dreamer, always thinking of running away. However, in this song, he finds himself remembering that time, and the things he took for granted.

 

I could not find a translation of the words, so I included a very nice rendition in English, by Eric Martin.

 

Jacques Brel:

 

 

Eric Martin:

 

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