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RICH'S B (AND WORSE) HORROR MOVIE THREAD

235 posts in this topic

Rich, just to let you know that your thread has been helping me deal with the recent death of my mother, "Bronxgirl's Mom"

 

You're brilliant as always!

 

Love,

 

Barb

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Rich, just to let you know that your thread has been helping me deal with the recent death of my mother, "Bronxgirl's Mom"

 

You're brilliant as always!

 

Love,

 

Barb

Thanks Barb, and thanks for stopping by. If you follow the original links, I'm sure you had some great commentary in them. It's good to look back at the "old days" on here.

Stay well.

Rich

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(the restoration of this thread continues)

 

Voodoo Woman (1957)

Directed by Edward L. Cahn

(originally posted here: http://forums.tcm.com/index.php?/topic/25581-voodoo-woman-1957/)

 

Fairly dull horror opus, with almost no action. Talent-challenged Marla English and Lance Fuller play a couple of crumbs who hire Joe Mannix ... er, Touch (Mike) Connors, to lead them into the jungle in search of gold. Meanwhile, mad doctor Tom Conway performs experiments on a native babe, turning her into a 6-foot Estelle Getty on steroids. Unfortunately, the native girl does not have the killer instinct that Conway desires, but English does. So guess who is Conway's next patient? Connors saves his own skin, and manages to snag Conway's wife in the process.

Tom Conway gives a bore-de-force performance. You've never seen him like this. His trademark pencil-thin moustache is missing. He literally speaks without moving his lips (this time, through mind control). His eyebrows are knit together in an almost simian appearance. He wears the most ridiculous headpiece in the history of hatdom. And he manages to get off a lengthy diatribe with only two glances as his cue cards.


Marla English drinks her fingers, while Lance Fuller gazes at the worm
crawling up Paul Dubov's head.
qGqlOya.jpg


Mary Ellen Kay flips off Otis Greene, who plays Bobo the houseboy.
IwSBZ4z.jpg


Marla English auditions for The Letter.
2vbY3Rt.jpg


A lounge singer puts the moves on Noel Coward. Good luck, lady.
8t79xM6.jpg


This scene is not nearly as suggestive as it looks.
ViMrPD8.jpg


Well, I guess when you gotta go, you gotta go.
IgysKZ2.jpg



(actual dialog) "You were interfering with my work, Susan.
Nobody's going to stand in my way, not even you.
If we had it do over again, we'd know better, wouldn't we, Susan?
You wouldn't have married a man of my age
and I wouldn't have undertaken to play nursemaid to a whimpering shallow woman
who's been crying homesick for the past seven years."
Ch6KyPQ.jpg


This is when you know your acting career is over.
i8O8kKR.jpg

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Voodoo Woman (1957)

 

Fairly dull horror opus, with almost no action. 

Who you calling dull? "I'm from Pittsburgh..."

 

(Actually, I'm rather fond of this film. From that great year for horror, 1957.)

 

tumblr_lj8l5f3FBz1qcay1ao1_500.gif

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The Wasp Woman (1959)

(originally posted here:  http://forums.tcm.com/index.php?/topic/26516-the-wasp-woman-1959/)

 

In this semi-entertaining flick from Roger Corman, Susan Cabot plays an aging executive of a cosmetic company, who is approached by an old geezer (Michael Mark), promising her a youthful appearance. All she has to do is get injections made from his jelly, taken from queen wasps. Of course, Ms. Cabot is impatient for results, so without telling Mark, she starts shooting up left and right. The results: she looks about 15 years younger but gets a 50-game suspension from baseball. She also turns into a wasp wearing high heels.

Fred (Anthony) Eisley and Barboura (yes, the spelling is correct) Morris work for Cabot and seem to enjoy some type of non-sexual relationship. A few other cast members get stung and/or bitten - it was too dark to tell for sure.

Ms. Cabot does well under the circumstances, but it takes about 50 minutes before we see her transformation. There are also long stretches where nothing happens, yet the film is only 72 minutes long. Poor Michael Mark gets the brunt of everything; he is attacked by a pussycat, run down by a car, loses his memory, gets director/producer Roger Corman for a doctor, is stung by Ms. Cabot, and finally clutches his chest and kicks off. His agent must have been a real son of a bee.


"As you can see, sales of rectangles have fallen off."
7qBrPMm.jpg



"I have here my scientific collection of jams and jellies. I have Apricot
Jam, Pearl Jam, Grape Jelly, Wasp Jelly, and my best-seller, Kentucky Jelly."
6YkFncq.jpg



"I call this impression 'dog barking under a halo'."
nkbViT1.jpg



Right after this scene was shot, Susan Cabot hit a baseball 600 feet.
K2a5gvD.jpg



"If this infernal buzzing would just stop - say, is that a stinger in my pants?"
hxwuFw0.jpg



Chief Ironside, the Retirement Home Years.
v2GMk5P.jpg



Anthony Eisley shows off his newly-earned GED to Barboura Morris. However, she still refuses to sleep with him.
gwCpHFl.jpg



"A colonoscopy??? For a black eye????"
OZQutcO.jpg



"Miss Cabot, I may not be a doctor, but I am the Director, and I'm ordering you
to change that bedpan."
H5UgFLT.jpg

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They Saved Hitler's Brain

(originally posted here: http://forums.tcm.com/index.php?/topic/26597-they-saved-hitlers-brain/)

 

I suppose film historians can sort through this mess to determine what actually happened. As far as I can tell, some imbeciles took a 1950s semi-entertaining piece of trash called The Madmen of Mandoras, then added about 20 minutes of footage from either the late 60s or early 70s, which was *total* trash. The result is a high body count, no continuity, night turning into day and vice-versa, a lot of bad acting, and Hitler's head in a jar.

The film opens with a scientist being followed by the Blues Brothers. His car explodes, so the boss at CID Headquarters assigns his top agent, Vic, to investigate. This is part of the CID's new policy: "Walk softly and carry a big Vic." I don't know what CID stands for, but the "I" definitely does not stand for intelligence. Vic is an idiot, and so is his new partner, played by a chick who looks bad in a miniskirt (this is the new footage, if you haven't guessed). In short order, the boss, Vic, and the chick buy the farm, leaving only the Blues Brothers. Then the 1950s movie starts, with film of an elephant collapsing from the effects of "G-gas." Must be the peanuts. Another scientist is kidnapped, so the entire (original) cast moves to Mandoras. At this point, I got lost trying to figure out who was who and who was a Nazi and who was not. I'm pretty sure this Hitler dude was not a nice guy, although at times, he rolled his eyes like Jerry Colonna. Hitler has a line of dialogue, so his vocal cords are still intact.

There are a few familiar faces in the cast (the old footage, not the new footage). Nestor Paiva shows up as a Police Chief who may or may not be on the level. Carlos Rivas plays a dual role, and seems to mysteriously appear from nowhere in almost every scene. John Holland, best known for playing Alice Kramden's boss on one episode of "The Honeymooners," appears as the scientist ... that is, the scientist in the old footage. The guy playing the scientist in the new footage is a nobody, along with the boss, Vic, and the chick.

This film had me on the edge of my seat ... my toilet seat, that is.

Carlos Rivas has an attack of gastritis.
RsNBTG1.jpg




Dennis Farina, without his platform shoes.
WLObFGM.jpg



Carlos Rivas has another attack of gastritis. The other actors are not thrilled.
K5D1Vg1.jpg



Carmen Miranda stars in I was a Mambo Dancer for the Third Reich.
hZpyfI5.jpg



Totie Fields waits to make a phone call, unaware that Carlos Rivas has been
put on hold - forever.
kehSZqO.jpg



Is it just me, or are there only two people in this bar who realize there is a
dead guy on the floor?
OAhIcrM.jpg



This is what happens when the set painters are dyslexic.
HdlpoA5.jpg



Adolf goes trick-or-treating.
Bs2okKY.jpg



Adolf's meat gets tenderized.
8lzz5B7.jpg



The producer's reaction when the three screenwriters pitch the idea for this film.
hmizHka.jpg

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Teenage Zombies (1959)

(originally posted here:  http://forums.tcm.com/index.php?/topic/25695-teenage-zombies-1959/)

The title apparently refers to the acting by the leads.

Jerry Warren, known for low-budget horror, directed, and also is credited as Music Supervisor, under the name Erich Bromberg. The opening theme is ripped off from Kronos. Several of the "actors" were also involved in the production end, which usually means the film is in trouble.

Four teenagers, led by Don ( The Giant Gila Monster ) Sullivan decide to go water skiing and end up on an island. Before long, they are imprisoned by a female mad scientist, played by Katherine Victor. Victor is cast in a role usually taken by Rudolph Anders; he was probably busy rehearsing for his role as the Nazi scientist in She Demons. At least Victor is better-looking than Anders, but her acting smells.

It seems Victor is doing experiments with gas, hoping to turn humans into mindless slaves. Today, we achieve the same result through higher education.

The dialogue goes something like this:

Sullivan: "Look, what kind of a creep joint is this?"

Victor: "A place of research and discovery ... a place where science is free from the interference of stupid politicians."

It's all a communist plot. There is a gorilla who wreaks some minor havoc, a crooked sheriff, characters named "Skip" and "Morrie," and some of the most ridiculous fight scenes ever staged. At least we are spared the agony of hearing Don ( The Giant Gila Monster ) Sullivan sing. Who could ever forget him strumming the ukulele and warbling "and the Lord said laugh, children, laugh..." in The Giant Gila Monster ?



Don Sullivan and Paul Pepper check out the new arrivals at the zoo.
k0q4ohL.jpg


"Okay fellas, Routine 6!"

FCKNiZU.jpg



Wally Cox tells his commanding officer that there are two UFOs outside the window.
aK1nNQV.jpg


"Okay fellas, Routine 9!"
QG2UrlW.jpg


"Morrie" tells Charles Bickford that Jane Wyman is pregnant.
OdnyUAQ.jpg


"Okay fellas, Routine 28!"
njMEzt0.jpg


Despite having been dead for almost 15 years, Dwight Frye came out of
retirement for this role.
sbISbf4.jpg


"Okay fellas, Routine - what the hell number are we up to?"
zhSuBpD.jpg




"Okay ladies, Routine - "
B4us5Ey.jpg


"And cut! Print it! That's a wrap!" (Thank God)
u2qGFma.jpg

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Mesa of Lost Women (1953)

 

(originally posted here:  http://forums.tcm.com/index.php?/topic/27278-mesa-of-lost-women-1953/)

 

The worst thing about this film (and trust me, there are plenty of things from which to choose) is the absolutely horrible music score, and I use the phrase loosely. The credit is given to Hoyt Curtin. The score consists of a Spanish guitar and a piano, with the same themes played over and over and over and over. I kept expecting to see Buddy Greco or some flamenco dancers. This was worse than being waterboarded while having to listen to Keith Olbermann.

Now on to the rest of the film. The narration is provided by Lyle Talbot. Strike one. The main character is a mad scientist played by Jackie Coogan. Strike two. The film bogs down immediately and becomes an extreme bore for most of its 67 minutes. "Grab some bench," as baseball announcer Ken "Hawk" Harrelson would say.

Chris-Pin Martin and some other guy who is only onscreen for a few minutes discover Robert Knapp and Paula Hill (yeah, I never heard of them either) wandering around the desert. Martin is wasted in a small role ... he is named "Pepe," which shows no imagination. If the writers had named him something like "Pants de Leon," then they'd be on to something. Anyway, Knapp mutters something about giant spiders in the desert. If he had seen giant ants and waited another year, this could have been the plot for a more famous movie. Now Knapp begins his story, except there is one problem. We have to sit through am earlier story before we get to Knapp's story.

Jackie Coogan is almost unrecognizable as Dr. Aranya, which apparently is Spanish for "spider." He is conducting experiments on women and spiders, with mixed results. He has worse results with men - they become midgets. Into this junior high school science laboratory comes Dr. Leland Masterson, played by Harmon Stevens (yeah, I never heard of him either). Coogan seems surprised when Dr. Masterson doesn't approve of the experiments, so after five minutes, Masterson is down for the count and ends up in an insane asylum. He escapes, and, incredibly, now carries a gun and a lot of money. He stumbles into a cantina, where he meets two people who are about to fly off and get married. He shoots a dancer (Tandra Quinn - yeah, I never heard of her either), who happens to be one of Coogan's "spider chicks," then "convinces" the couple to take him to their plane. The pilot, played by Robert Knapp (yeah, I never heard of him either - oh wait, he was the guy in the desert), is rightly perturbed, but takes on this new passenger. The plane promptly crashes in the middle of nowhere ... well, actually, not far from Coogan's funhouse. For the next 30 minutes, we get 'talk talk talk,' as FredCDobbs would say. The future bride (Paula Hill - are you getting all the connections now???) develops the hots for Knapp, which is no surprise since the future groom is much older and not very good-looking. The old guy gets bumped off by a spider on steroids. Eventually, the rest of the cast end up in Coogan's laboratory, where a now-sane Dr. Masterson saves the day.

Tandra Quinn is worth watching only because she has great looks. She has no lines, slinks around, does her dance for about 5 minutes, all to the accompaniment of the horrid music score. Her character is named Tarantella - hey, "Tarantella," do you get it? Do ya???

"I am not opening my eyes again until you fix your damn belt!"
dN0Kw4t.jpg



Jackie Coogan shows off his new glasses, courtesy of LensBlasters.
26x64jA.jpg



"The plane! The plane!"
nIQRSK4.jpg



Morticia discovers the cure for H1N1, while Paul Henreid looks on.
wQRURPW.jpg



Henry Silva approaches Jackie Coogan with "I ask for job."
lqo8BbQ.jpg



The late tv journalist Howard K. Smith falls off the wagon.
2RLJyjz.jpg



Alright, maybe I can watch 67 minutes of this.
54TEEdY.jpg

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(the restoration of this thread is complete)

 

The Manster (1959)

(originally posted here:http://forums.tcm.com/index.php?/topic/27727-the-manster-1959/)

 

This is a surprise - a Japanese horror flick with no giant monsters.

Peter Dyneley plays reporter Larry Stanford. He works in Japan, and bags an interview with Dr. Suzuki, played by Satoshi Nakamura. Suzuki is working on a theory of "eeevolution," so you know this is going to be trouble. Suzuki's wife and brother have already been used in his experiments, which is what pharmaceutical companies would call "Phase One trials." The results are not good. So Suzuki gives Stanford a mickey, then injects something into his shoulder.

Slowly but surely Stanford begins to change. He cuts off contact with his wife, who is in the States. Then he takes up with Suzuki's assistant, Tara, played by Terri Kimmern. Tara was apparently "found" by Suzuki somewhere. Judging by the way she looks in tight clothes, he didn't find her in a convent. Stanford's wife makes a surprise visit to Japan and doesn't like what she sees. Meanwhile, Stanford keeps rubbing his shoulder.

In one of the film's key moments, Stanford rips off his shirt to reveal the cause of his distress. He eventually grows an entire second head, then goes around the city committing various acts of mayhem against women and the Japanese police force. He finally gets around to a confrontation with Suzuki, and, in the climax, splits into two beings (himself and something ape-like). And there just happens to be a volcano nearby.

Not a bad way to kill 72 minutes. Dyneley is fairly convincing, or about as convincing as you can get with an extra head. He looks, sounds, and acts like Lon Chaney, Jr. Kimmern is good to look at, and sounds like Luciana Paluzzi. Nakamura sounds like Yul Brynner.




"Tonight, the moon will be full, and I'll turn into a wolf."
w40LgSO.jpg



A long-lost scene from The Lady From Shanghai.
fvZyqgv.jpg



"Come and listen to a story 'bout a man named Jed."
ZGxqYsK.jpg



"Now show me 'sand the floor'."
IGJHqcM.jpg



You can probably figure out why I posted this one.
Ue416Rl.jpg



Kam Fong as "Chin Ho." Zulu as "Kono."
hb78In5.jpg



"Don't take this personally bub, but your impression of Ming the Merciless stinks."
tpOaKSO.jpg



I don't believe this condition will be covered under the "public option."
15xG7dJ.jpg

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(the restoration of this thread is complete)

 

The Manster (1959)

(originally posted here:http://forums.tcm.com/index.php?/topic/27727-the-manster-1959/)

 

This is a surprise - a Japanese horror flick with no giant monsters.

 

Peter Dyneley plays reporter Larry Stanford. He works in Japan, and bags an interview with Dr. Suzuki, played by Satoshi Nakamura. Suzuki is working on a theory of "eeevolution," so you know this is going to be trouble. Suzuki's wife and brother have already been used in his experiments, which is what pharmaceutical companies would call "Phase One trials." The results are not good. So Suzuki gives Stanford a mickey, then injects something into his shoulder.

 

Slowly but surely Stanford begins to change. He cuts off contact with his wife, who is in the States. Then he takes up with Suzuki's assistant, Tara, played by Terri Kimmern. Tara was apparently "found" by Suzuki somewhere. Judging by the way she looks in tight clothes, he didn't find her in a convent. Stanford's wife makes a surprise visit to Japan and doesn't like what she sees. Meanwhile, Stanford keeps rubbing his shoulder.

 

In one of the film's key moments, Stanford rips off his shirt to reveal the cause of his distress. He eventually grows an entire second head, then goes around the city committing various acts of mayhem against women and the Japanese police force. He finally gets around to a confrontation with Suzuki, and, in the climax, splits into two beings (himself and something ape-like). And there just happens to be a volcano nearby.

 

Not a bad way to kill 72 minutes. Dyneley is fairly convincing, or about as convincing as you can get with an extra head. He looks, sounds, and acts like Lon Chaney, Jr. Kimmern is good to look at, and sounds like Luciana Paluzzi. Nakamura sounds like Yul Brynner.

 

 

 

 

"Tonight, the moon will be full, and I'll turn into a wolf."

w40LgSO.jpg

 

 

 

A long-lost scene from The Lady From Shanghai.

fvZyqgv.jpg

 

 

 

"Come and listen to a story 'bout a man named Jed."

ZGxqYsK.jpg

 

 

 

"Now show me 'sand the floor'."

IGJHqcM.jpg

 

 

 

You can probably figure out why I posted this one.

Ue416Rl.jpg

 

 

 

Kam Fong as "Chin Ho." Zulu as "Kono."

hb78In5.jpg

 

 

 

"Don't take this personally bub, but your impression of Ming the Merciless stinks."

tpOaKSO.jpg

 

 

 

I don't believe this condition will be covered under the "public option."

15xG7dJ.jpg

Love the scenes with the two headed creature

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