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Movie Blunders

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Re The Godfather, how about Vito asking Michael if he is happy with his wife and "children" when they only had one son at the time (the daughter they had later, shown in Godfather II, wasn't born yet).

 

BLU

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In An American in Paris, there's a scene where Leslie Caron ("Lise Bouvier") rushes to the stage door to meet Georges Guetary ("Henri Baurel") as he is leaving the theatre after his show. Henri introduces Lise to a man who has just hired him to perform in America. After the man leaves, Lise turns to Henri and starts speaking her next line in French. ("Henri, je . . ."). Then she quickly switches back to English ("Henri, I . . .").

 

Caron and Guetary would most likely have spoken to each other in French in real life, so her slip is understandable.

 

Midge

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There is a movie blunder in "On The Waterfront" that nobody ever seems to mention. During the famous taxi scene, Marlon Brando is sitting behind the driver, yet when he exits the car, they show an aerial view of the car with him getting out on the passenger side of the car. Unless he climbs over his brother Charlie, I always felt this was a blunder.

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Here's one:

 

When Bogie is reading the note from Bergman, it is dissolved by the heavy rain and he is dripping wet, so is Sam, who delivered the note. But then he is standing on the step of the train totally dry.

 

More like these are listed at www.moviemistakes.com

 

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My favorite is the end of the Claude Rains version of "the Invisible Man" in it, the Invisible Man has removed all his clothes, so he cannot be seen: and the police are tracking his footprints in the new-fallen snow. The thing is, his footprints look like the soles of shoes (which he wouldn't be wearing, since he's all **** and stuff)

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santablog, that is a good observation. As many time as I've seen "The Invisible Man" I have never noticed that blunder. You can be sure I will be watching for it next time it's on TCM.

 

Mongo

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MOVIE BLUNDERS are something I notice all the time, but can't recall whenever threads like this come along! :angry:

Sepiatone

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Just a little blunder, in the movie "Black Fury" (1935) during the hospital scene. An ELECTRIC wall clock doesn't tick...tick...tick...tick..

5b3540ee172f0.image.jpg

:lol:

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On 10/13/2019 at 11:31 AM, hamradio said:

Movie-Bloopers-7.png

:o

I wonder if that's VICTOR MATURE's wristwatch?  :D 

Anyway, I can't pinpoint the exact moment, but in REEFER MADNESS, there's a scene in which a kid, "hopped up" on pot, is driving a car wildly, and you HEAR the car speed up, but at the same time, there's a shot of the car's speedometer showing that it's SLOWING DOWN!  :D  Now, that's good sh*t  ;) 

Sepiatone

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14 hours ago, hamradio said:

Just a little blunder, in the movie "Black Fury" (1935) during the hospital scene. An ELECTRIC wall clock doesn't tick...tick...tick...tick..

5b3540ee172f0.image.jpg

:lol:

Many did.

Electromechanical clocks have a traditional mechanical movement but are wound by an electric motor at regular intervals. They were popular with institutions because they did not need the daily winding of a mechanical clock, they were more accurate than standard electrical clocks prior to the invention of the synchronous motor clock and they would continue to keep time even when the mains went down.

The Telechron clock which you pictured is a synchronous motor clock. The disk below the company name indicated when the mains supply had been interrupted and the time needed to be reset.

Electromagnetic clocks also tick as they are mechanical in all respects but that the pendulum is driven electrically. 

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In 1982's Annie, the characters go see Camille at Radio City. The film's set in 1933, per a line of dialogue late in the film. Camille wasn't released until 1936.

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6 hours ago, CinemaInternational said:

In 1982's Annie, the characters go see Camille at Radio City. The film's set in 1933, per a line of dialogue late in the film. Camille wasn't released until 1936.

The scene at the B&O bridge, there were no 50 foot Hydra cushion boxcars either.

ssw_23908_041908_DSC_9624.jpg

 

 

At night the modern skyline sticks out like a sore thumb.

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7 hours ago, SansFin said:

Many did.

Electromechanical clocks have a traditional mechanical movement but are wound by an electric motor at regular intervals. They were popular with institutions because they did not need the daily winding of a mechanical clock, they were more accurate than standard electrical clocks prior to the invention of the synchronous motor clock and they would continue to keep time even when the mains went down.

The Telechron clock which you pictured is a synchronous motor clock. The disk below the company name indicated when the mains supply had been interrupted and the time needed to be reset.

Electromagnetic clocks also tick as they are mechanical in all respects but that the pendulum is driven electrically. 

I think you are referring to Self Winding Clocks.  The one I worked on, the mechanism was patented in 1898. (it was engraved on it)  It used a large dry cell battery to wind the clock, ticking is quite notable.  It ran slightly fast so it can be synchronized once a day by telephone cable.  Businesses had to pay a subscription service.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Self_Winding_Clock_Company

The model I worked on. Had to adjust the pendulum ever so slightly to get real time accuracy because remote sync was no longer available. Also provided a low voltage power supply.

90-jpg.365805

 

217077_SWC_No_18_-_wm3-1504208290.jpg

F144770369.jpg

Fond memory of these batteries from my elementary school years but were the  standard carbon variety.

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35 minutes ago, hamradio said:

I think you are referring to Self Winding Clocks.

The ones to which I am referring were similar to those typically found in institutions and large offices but they plugged into mains current rather than needing to be wound.

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On 6/23/2005 at 10:43 AM, bhryun said:

There is a movie blunder in "On The Waterfront" that nobody ever seems to mention. During the famous taxi scene, Marlon Brando is sitting behind the driver, yet when he exits the car, they show an aerial view of the car with him getting out on the passenger side of the car. Unless he climbs over his brother Charlie, I always felt this was a blunder.

Speaking of cars, in North by Northwest, when Cary Grant tries to lean over the one gunman and open the door of the car, there's a quick insert shot of him fiddling with the door handle, which proves to be locked. But there's no longer any gunman between him and the door in that shot for him to lean over. He's back in the next shot, after Cary has given up. 

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Oh yeah, and in American Graffiti, which is set on high school graduation night, almost all the songs playing in everyone's cars, except maybe for the Beach Boys one, are anywhere from four to seven years old. What radio stations being listened to by all the high school seniors would feature only music from their middle school years?

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In American Graffiti, a lot goes on. The last day of Summer, 1962. The Beach Boys were an example of the change in music that was coming.

The movie begins with Rock Around The Clock. Some consider it the beginning of Rock 'n' Roll. It was recorded on 4/12/54 and first charted on 5/14/55. The success is thanks to Blackboard Jungle.

My Joel Whitburn Top Pop Singles book also claims it was on the Billboard charts 24 weeks and #1 - 8 weeks.

The music and Wolfman Jack are very important to the movie.

Remember John Milner's quote: "Rock and roll's been going down hill ever since Buddy Holly died." You know, The Day The Music Died, February 3, 1959.

I can't think of it as a blunder. You would need to ask someone older than me for an 'I was there' opinion.

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I don't want to belabor the point. It's all great music. I have most of those songs in my iTunes collection. I just find it hard to believe songs four to eight years old would be blaring out of the car radios of teenagers in that era way more the songs that were in the Top 40 at that moment.

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I do wish to belabor the point. Keep in mind, the songs were a break away point from the parent's music. In other words, this was a new sound. The kids had their own music. I don't think they cared if songs were older. They were still the new sound.

If you think it is a blunder, you don't get the movie. The music is the movie.

I was around in the 60's and 70's. I was there when AM radio was King. It was about the music and the DJs.

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