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HollywoodGolightly

Your favorite film noir actors?

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> {quote:title=HollywoodGolightly wrote:}{quote}

And I haven't seen Touch of Evil in a while now, but I'll try and screen it soon.

 

I'm sure you'll screen the newer restoration, made according to Welles' 58 page memo to Universal. I once had the good fortune to hang out a bit with Welles' scholar Jonathan Rosenbaum, and Gary Graver, Welles' last cinematographer. I ventured to say that IMO, Touch of Evil was Welles' best film. They looked at me like 'anyone who knows anything knows that,' and said, yes, it was... I was surprised, due to the common opinion that Citizen Kane is about the best film ever made. Of course, I like it too.

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> {quote:title=ValentineXavier wrote:}{quote}

> I'm sure you'll screen the newer restoration, made according to Welles' 58 page memo to Universal. I once had the good fortune to hang out a bit with Welles' scholar Jonathan Rosenbaum, and Gary Graver, Welles' last cinematographer. I ventured to say that IMO, Touch of Evil was Welles' best film. They looked at me like 'anyone who knows anything knows that,' and said, yes, it was... I was surprised, due to the common opinion that Citizen Kane is about the best film ever made. Of course, I like it too.

 

Yes, I have the most recent version that was released on DVD, I believe it includes both the restoration and the original theatrical release.

 

(And how lucky you are to have hung out with folks who knew Welles so well!)

 

In another noir-related comment, I've just watched a marvelous double bill featuring the great Belita - the ice-skating Queen of Noir. The movies were Suspense and The Gangster - and both of them also starring the underrated Barry Sullivan.

 

Both are certainly great B noirs, imho.

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When I lived in Panorama City in the valley my wife and I would go to Philip Ahn's "Moongate" restaurant and sometime see Barry Sullivan there with his grandson, I stopped by his table one night to say how much I enjoyed his work over the years and he was most gracious. I agree he was a very underrated actor and he gave some really fine performances in some good and some not very good films....

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> {quote:title=fredbaetz wrote:}{quote}

> When I lived in Panorama City in the valley my wife and I would go to Philip Ahn's "Moongate" restaurant and sometime see Barry Sullivan there with his grandson,

 

That is so good to hear he was gracious. Did you ask him for his autograph?

 

Even though I just saw it yesterday, his performance in The Gangster still feels pretty fresh in my mind. He really did a great job in capturing the protagonist's crumbling state of mind. It's a great performance like you don't often see in Poverty Row movies.

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john_garfield.jpg

 

Recently watched a double feature of The Postman Always Rings Twice and He Ran All the Way. It's great to watch Garfield in a noir, but it's also very sad to think about the way his career was cut so tragically short.

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Fine actor. "He Ran All the Way" proved to be Garfileds final film. He died less then a year later at age 39 of heart attack. He had been under a lot of pressure to name names to the HUAC during the "RED SCARE" in Hollywood. If I remember correctly the director John Berry and writers Dulton Trumbo and Hugo Butler did the picture under alias due to their blacklisting.

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> {quote:title=fredbaetz wrote:}{quote}

> Fine actor. "He Ran All the Way" proved to be Garfileds final film. He died less then a year later at age 39 of heart attack. He had been under a lot of pressure to name names to the HUAC during the "RED SCARE" in Hollywood. If I remember correctly the director John Berry and writers Dulton Trumbo and Hugo Butler did the picture under alias due to their blacklisting.

I can't believe it was the blacklisting that make him die. His last three movies were really good. Anyone see The Breaking Point (1950)

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Garfield had had heart problems for years.While his wife had been a member of the Communist Party there is no evidence he ever was.He was called before the HUAC and he refused to name names.There was a publication called "Red Channels" and this was sent to movie studios,radio and TV stations. If your name was in the publication you were blacklisted and they would not hire you.Some members of the "Theater Group" {which was being targeted as Communist} like Elia Kazan,Clifford Odets and Lee J. Cobb named names. Others like Garfield and Will Geer,Howard De Silve and Stella Adler refused and were blacklisted and could not find work in movies radio or TV.Many stated the stress of blacklisting and having trouble finding work helped bring on his heart attack.Unless you lived in those times it's hard to understand the paranoia that existed then.Many talented people careers were ruined...

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> {quote:title=fredbaetz wrote:}{quote}

> Fine actor. "He Ran All the Way" proved to be Garfileds final film. He died less then a year later at age 39 of heart attack. He had been under a lot of pressure to name names to the HUAC during the "RED SCARE" in Hollywood. If I remember correctly the director John Berry and writers Dulton Trumbo and Hugo Butler did the picture under alias due to their blacklisting.

 

Yes, "Czar of Noir" Eddie Muller mentioned some of that while introducing the double feature at NoirCity.

 

I guess we should also remember that his heart condition prevented Garfield from enlisting during WW2. But, still trying to do his part to help out with the war effort, he was one of the co-founders of the Hollywood Canteen.

 

Any medical condition aside, I think he really did have a big heart.

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> {quote:title=fredbaetz wrote:}{quote}

> .Many stated the stress of blacklisting and having trouble finding work helped bring on his heart attack.Unless you lived in those times it's hard to understand the paranoia that existed then.Many talented people careers were ruined...

But he was working at the end of his career. Force of Evil was a good movie. And The Breaking Point was directed by Michael Curtiz. Watch the movie and tell me he wasn't doing good work.

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He last film was release 19 June 1951 and he died 21 May 1952. He was a sick man. Probably at that time no bank would finance a film he was the star.

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moore,%20cleo_bw06_250.jpg

 

She might be more B-movie that noir, but the inimitable Cleo Moore surely had her day in the spotlight at Noir City yesterday, when the festival screened two of the movies she made at Columbia in the 50s: One Girl's Confession and Women's Prison.

 

Noir City's program notes describe her as the poor man's Marilyn Monroe. But I think she had a certain vulnerable grittiness that the great Marilyn could never have matched.

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raymond-burr1.jpg

 

It is a testimony to the ubiquitousness of Raymond Burr in the world of noir that a double feature in this year's Noir City festival was also, apparently inadvertently, a Burr double bill: he gets to play the heavy in both the ultra-rare Red Light (1949) and Walk a Crooked Mile (1948). And, just a few days earlier, he had appeared in another film screened at the festival, Pitfall.

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Virginia%20Mayo.jpg

 

I first grew to like Virginia Mayo for all the comedies she did, especially those from the 40s.

 

But she was also quite good in noir; I think she did very well in both White Heat and also in the one I had just mentioned, Red Light.

 

As for Burr, I don't think his having lived in Vallejo affected the choice of films for the festival in any way. However, it is possible he liked working on films shot in San Francisco; the theme of last night's double feature was noirs that were set and shot in SF.

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