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222characteractor

DVRs and TCM

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As a hedge against the day when copy protection takes over I record quite a lot.

 

I watch whatever I please, whenever I please. You should as well.

 

PM me for more information.

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> {quote:title=HollywoodGolightly wrote:}{quote}

> Last I checked, prices were in the neighborhood of $100 for a regular DVR (at least the DirecTV ones), $200 for a HD-DVR,

 

As a long-time DirecTV subscriber, I just wanted to point out something that sometimes confuses people. When you get a DVR from either DirecTV or Dish Network, you are not buying it, you are leasing it. Actually, that's true with cable DVRs too, but I don't know their specifics.

 

It doesn't matter if you get it through them or from a store like Best Buy, the $99 ($199 HD) you pay is just part of the lease. After that you pay around $6.00 a month DVR fee in addition to the normal monthly programming charge. It's actually a pretty good deal because if you were buy one outright it would cost you around $500. ($800 HD).

 

For most folks, it really doesn't matter if it leased or not, but it's something everyone should be clear about.

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I wonder what would be better to get

 

Kinokima, talkietime was 100% correct on the quality and ease of use (my first priority) of the Panasonic ES35V, so I trust him (and others) that the Magnavox 2160 is the best of the new models.

 

talkietime, reading your posts on the AVS forum and here, is it any wonder those of us who, sorry to say, just want to turn on the machine and record and watch are lost when it comes to these machines? I don't want a $99. Blue Light special, but at the same time, I know I don't take advantage of all the capabilities of my Panasonic, nor will I with the Magnavox. It's just the reality of it for those of us (okay, maybe just me) who were quite happy with analog cable and our VCRs and our CRT televisions.

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I used to have problems that I blamed on my DISH DVR box copy guarding everything from music channels to most of the Encore channels. Turned out though it was my JVC DVD recorder/combo.

I had some silly made for TV movie on my DVR for about a year, and after 2 JVC recorders died, I ended up getting a Toshiba DVD recorder only(good folks at that AVS forum told me not to get another combo, they just aren't well built) anyway, I could suddenly record that movie off the harddrive! :)

 

Oh, when we signed up for DISH several years ago, they had a deal where they tossed in the the DVR for free! But, that was several years ago, they might not still do that.

 

I have noticed both DISH and Direct have the same deal which for 1 year you can get the mid level packages(the ones you need to get TCM and Fox Movie) for half the normal price.

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I forgot, don't know if anyone will find it that interesting, but for the first time ever, I tried to record a movie, and in the middle of playback, it switched from the movie I was recording( *Footlight Parade* ) to the movie currently on Fox, *Silent Movie* ! Then it switched back, before the end. I double checked the movie on the harddrive, it was all *Footlight Parade* ! Someone 'splain that to me please???

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What I've done with my Toshiba DVR670KU is this since it has a built in Digital tuner I had Time Warner run the cable direct in to the unit I keep the on channel 3 the unit sees the signal as channel 3. So I can record off my DVR with NO Problems I can also watch the the DVR upsampled to 1080P as I record. I then upsample the DVD's to 1080p. I've found I get the best results using Verbatim or Sony DVR+ R16X X (you can only record once on the disk,)

 

Edited by: Paul2 on Feb 16, 2010 12:50 PM

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I would like to see TCM stream their programming. I would be happy to pay TCM and get rid of my cable company and just use the broadband Cablevison provides. TCM is the only channel I watch. I would hate to loose it but its almost not worth paying 79.00 per month for family cable.

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Does anyone have any simple layman's instructions on using a DVD recorder (under 200 bucks) and maybe purchasing a separate tuner, to record from my DirecTV DVR to DVDs? If there is a thread, can someone point me in the right direction (something in layman's terms please!) or if someone has simple directions, can you inbox me? I have many films I want to record to DVD and delete to make room on my DVR. Thanks.

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Perhaps the simplest way to record from a DVR or converter box is to connect that device's composite yellow RCA video output to the corresponding yellow RCA input on a DVD Recorder. Also connect the DVR or converter box white and red RCA audio outputs to the corresponding white and red RCA audio inputs on the DVD Recorder. Then use the DVD Recorder remote control to select that input as the ?source? for the recording. Of course the DVD Recorder output will need to be connected to a TV input. The same yellow, white and red DVD Recorder RCA output combinations to TV RCA inputs may be used for that purpose. That input will need to be selected with the TV remote.

 

Copying a TCM Classic Movie from the DVR hard drive to DVD is accomplished by playing the movie on the DVR and recording it to DVD from the DVD Recorder input.

 

Later, you may want to use more upscale connections between the DVD Recorder and the TV but this should suffice for the time being.

 

Edited by: talkietime on Mar 5, 2010 9:38 PM

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DVRs really are a wonderful thing, aren't they? VHS tapes take up so much space and don't seem to hold up as well over time as DVDs do. Lost one too many tapes to tape-eating VCRs. Haven't had any such mishaps with DVRs or DVD players (knock on wood).

 

Thanks to my DVR, I can carry some of my favourite films with me wherever I go. I've been converting choice films that I recorded off of TCM and loading them into my ipod. Comes in handy when I have to wait around somewhere with time to kill and I'm too tired to read.

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Cable and satellite DVRs are fine for time-shifting to their internal hard drives but, with their limited hard drive capacity, that method of recording soon becomes a drawback since cable and satellite DVRs are prevented by law from recording to removable media (DVDs).

 

I prefer to use my own HDD/DVD Recorders and DVD Recorders to archive TCM and some other programming to DVDs so that I may view whatever I please, whenever I please.

 

Currently, my home-recording set up has five HDD/DVD Recorders and seven DVD Recorders with my entire home-recorded DVD archive, more than 6,000 DVDs stored in ?albums? that occupy just three shelves (totaling around 34x43x13 inches) of a five shelf bookcase. My most recently-filled album holds 520 DVDs home-recorded between 12/19/2009 and 3/3/2010.

 

Two of my HDD/DVD Recorders were tandem recording around the clock with 48 hour "sprints" during the recent Encore Westerns marathons of Have Gun, Will Travel; Gunsmoke and Gene Autry episodes. One of those HDD/DVD Recorders continues to record daily episodes of Have Gun, Will Travel and Gunsmoke as well as some obscure classic movies and classic westerns from America One and a few odds and ends from MGM's THIS network; while another HDD/DVD recorder takes care of the daily episodes of the Perry Mason series shown by our local Fox station and more odds and ends from THIS. HDD/DVD Recorders make it easy to edit out interstitials or commercials before high-speed dubbing such material to DVDs.

 

Edited by: talkietime on Mar 5, 2010 11:04 PM

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Maybe I used the wrong term. When I mentioned my DVR, I was referring to my DVD player that records on blank DVD+R discs.

 

> I prefer to use my own HDD/DVD Recorders and DVD Recorders to archive TCM and some other programming to DVDs so that I may view whatever I please, whenever I please.

 

I hear ya.

 

> Currently, my entire home-recorded DVD archive, more than 6,000 DVDs stored in albums, occupies just three shelves (totaling around 34x43x13 inches) of a five shelf bookcase. My most recently-filled album holds 520 DVDs home-recorded between 12/19/2009 and 3/3/2010.

 

Five-hundred and twenty? Phew! Your recorder(s) must have been running non-stop since mid-December. Do you think you'll find the time to watch 'em all?

 

One thing's for certain: You'll never have to buy or rent another movie for lack of your own.

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> {quote:title=talkietime wrote:}{quote}

> I prefer to use my own HDD/DVD Recorders and DVD Recorders to archive TCM and some other programming to DVDs so that I may view whatever I please, whenever I please.

>

> Two of my HDD/DVD Recorders were tandem recording around the clock with 48 hour "sprints" during the recent Encore Westerns marathons of Have Gun, Will Travel; Gunsmoke and Gene Autry episodes. One of those HDD/DVD Recorders continues to record daily episodes of Have Gun, Will Travel and Gunsmoke as well as some obscure classic movies and classic westerns from America One and a few odds and ends from MGM's THIS network; while another HDD/DVD recorder takes care of the daily episodes of the Perry Mason series shown by our local Fox station and more odds and ends from THIS. HDD/DVD Recorders make it easy to edit out interstitials or commercials before high-speed dubbing such material to DVDs.

>

 

I have been using Pioneer HDD/DVD recorders for at least 8 years. I have 13 of them, plus more on standby. I prefer the Pioneer models because they let me place the titles in an editable copy list before dubbing at high speed to DVD. Some brands (like Toshiba) have no editable copy list and so you have to modify the original title before transferring to DVD, which I don't like.

 

I also recorded the Gunsmoke and The Virginian marathon on the Westerns Channel and have continued to record them daily. I also recorded all of Maverick, The Rifleman, and The Big Valley when the Westerns Channel first started showing those. Of course, I recorded Gunsmoke several years ago on my HDD/DVD recorders when the Westerns Channel first ran it, but I now have Pioneer models that record in higher resolution, so I am recording them again.

 

I also record a lot of movies from Fox Movie Channel since they are also uncut and commercial-free. Sometimes they use pan-and-scan so I wait until they show the movie in letterbox.

 

I have two recorders dedicated to TCM, and two dedicated to Boomerang. I haven't counted the DVDs I've recorded but it's well over 6000.

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> {quote:title=talkietime wrote:}{quote}

> I use Taiyo Yuden 8x Premium Line DVD-R media with all my Magnavox, Philips and Panasonic recorders:

>

> http://www.supermediastore.com/product/u/taiyo-yuden-silver-thermal-8x-dvd-r-media-100-pack

>

> I usually purchase TY media by the case of 600 discs.

 

I use Taiyo Yuden as well, however I use silver thermal 16x DVD-R. I used to get them at supermediastore, but I didn't like the fact that they shipped using styrofoam peanuts. Often the peanuts would get crushed and the peanut dust would work its way into the DVD cakeboxes because there are small openings in the bottom of the cakeboxes. I didn't like to risk putting blank DVDs with peanut dust on them into my Pioneer HDD/DVD recorders. I have since switched to a supplier that uses bubblewrap--same cost as supermediastore, same free shipping, but faster delivery time (because it's closer to me), and fewer damaged cakeboxes than I had from supermediastore.

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> {quote:title=markfp2 wrote:}{quote}

> As a long-time DirecTV subscriber, I just wanted to point out something that sometimes confuses people. When you get a DVR from either DirecTV or Dish Network, you are not buying it, you are leasing it. Actually, that's true with cable DVRs too, but I don't know their specifics.

>

> It doesn't matter if you get it through them or from a store like Best Buy, the $99 ($199 HD) you pay is just part of the lease. After that you pay around $6.00 a month DVR fee in addition to the normal monthly programming charge. It's actually a pretty good deal because if you were buy one outright it would cost you around $500. ($800 HD).

>

> For most folks, it really doesn't matter if it leased or not, but it's something everyone should be clear about.

 

I am a long-time DirecTV subscriber and it seems to me that it used to be that you owned the box outright in the old days. This was back when the receivers were being made by a number of manufacturers like RCA. I believe I owned the receivers outright and could dispose of them as I pleased. When the receivers began to malfunction and I needed to get them replaced, I was told now all the receivers were made by DirecTV (or at least have the DirecTV brand on them), and that I would have to pay a lease fee each month. I don't believe I had to pay a monthly lease fee for the RCA receivers I bought back in 1999. Also, now the receivers have to be returned to DirecTV when taken out of use, which was not the case with the RCA receivers I originally owned.

 

I guess you can look at it as the $99 being part of the lease but it sure feels like you are buying the box and then still having to pay a monthly lease fee. At least with cable you don't have to pay $99 up front for a box you don't own.

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I use TY 8x Premium Line DVD-R discs because my Panasonic recorders are friendlier with the ?-? format and my Magnavox and Philips also work well with the ?-? format. My Magnavox and Philips HDD/DVD recorders have 10x (2160A), 8x (2160) or 4x (2080/3575/3576) DVD Drives so they do not need 16x discs for high-speed dubbing. (I do very little DVD burning with my computers that have 20x and 22x DVD burners.)

 

As my primary concerns are DVD burn quality and extending laser assembly longevity, I?ve settled upon TY 8x discs as the best media for my use. This Wajo post confirmed my 2008 decision to transition from 16x Verbatim, Maxell and Sony media to 8x Taiyo Yuden DVD-R media:

 

http://www.avsforum.com/avs-vb/showpost.php?p=12298494&postcount=20#DVDcare3

 

While I usually purchase my TY discs in the very sturdy original TY 600 disc shipping box I sometimes purchase TY discs in smaller quantities. Two cake boxes from SuperMediaStore arrived yesterday. One of those cake boxes had its upper portion compacted down over the base section making that spindle difficult to open. The small SMS shipping box hadn?t evidenced any kind of shipping trauma. The compacted cake box wasn?t actually damaged nor was there any damage to the discs themselves. I?ve also found a few cake box center shafts that have snapped after leaving the factory but that didn?t damage the discs. My practice has been to place TY discs on non-TY spindles as soon as a cake box is opened. TY puts the quality into the media, not the cake box.

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At least with cable you don't have to pay $99 up front for a box you don't own.

 

I don't do DVR, I won't pay to record garbage, but with Cablevision, the crooks, you don't even own the remote, you rent it every month.

 

FIOS isn't much better, you have to rent the cablebox, which is a useless hunk of plastic, but at least they are, ahem, generous enough to give you the remotes.

 

Oh, and don't forget that the owner of the crooks at Cablevision which stole 10 stations from their 25 year subscribers and held the FN for ransom and are now holding Channel 7 for ransom, owns the Knicks.

 

LoveFilmNoir, did you get your 'simple' answer? It might be due to the horrific complexity of the new technology, but I ain't gettin' this all.

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talkietime, what kind of albums do you use that hold 520 discs and where do you get them?

 

And thanks for that link to SuperMediaStore. I now use the Taiyo Yuden discs too. My only concern using these with the Magnavox HDD/DVD recorder is that it converts the DVD-R to a R, or so the instruction booklet says. So I'm wondering if that means it has to go through an extra step using DVD-Rs that might result in creating a problem disc easier than if I just used DVDRs.

 

Also, I'm disappointed the Mag doesn't have a 90-min recording setting for it's DVDs, like most DVD recorders do. I'm wondering if I would get a better picture recording movies 60+ mins long in HQ on the Mag's HD then dubbing it to a disc using SP, instead of recording it in SP and then high-speed dubbing to disc in SP. Do I lose the better quality of the original HQ recording when I dub it to SP? In other words, would HQ to SP give a better picture than SP to SP? The con being, of course, no high-speed dubbing?

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Web,

 

I purchase my DVD albums at shop4tech or SuperMediaStore:

 

http://www.shop4tech.com/z/CD_DVD_Wallets/1_97_284/

 

http://www.supermediastore.com/category/u/cd-dvd-blu-ray-wallet-case-wallets-cases

 

Since this thread is not for the purpose of detailed discussions of the outstanding Magnavox H2160MW9A HDD/DVD Recorder, I?ll make a few quick comments responding to your questions and then direct you to the wealth of information concerning that product found in Wajo?s AVS Forum sticky thread.

 

I assure you that DVD-R discs can not be converted into anything other than a DVD-R disc. You must be re-interpreting one of the statements concerning changing recording formats for specialized purposes.

 

I see very little difference in picture quality between the HQ and SP recording modes so I do not use HQ.

 

With regard to dubbing hard drive recordings to DVD, anytime one changes the original recording mode (?speed?) to a different recording mode (?speed?) there is a re-encoding that requires real-time dubbing and results in picture quality degradation. The goal is to maximize use of high-speed dubbing that preserves the original picture quality and requires very little laser use time. Real-time recording or dubbing to DVDs requires real-time use of the laser.

 

Experienced users do not record directly to DVDs but record to the hard drive after choosing hard drive recording mode(s) that allow high-speed dubbing of hard drive content, whether edited or not, to a DVD. Recording directly to the hard drive does not use the laser. Since high-speed dubbing of DVDs is accomplished in ?bursts? or ?blocks? very little laser use time is required. Let?s say that one is high-speed dubbing 2.5 hours SPP of hard drive content to a DVD. The high-speed dub may take seventeen minutes, including finalizing, with a laser-use time totaling only three or four minutes. A real-time 2.5 hour dub or direct to DVD recording will require 150 minutes of laser use time.

 

In order to extend the useful life of the DVD Drive laser, experienced users do not use a HDD/DVD recorder or DVD Recorder as a DVD player because that also requires real-time use of the laser. It?s best to prolong the life of the laser assembly. Most stand-alone recorders use expensive proprietary DVD Drives. Replacement of failed DVD Drives is often very expensive and replacement parts may no longer be found for some models. (For details see my ?DigaDo? AVS Forum posts concerning Panasonic DVD Drives.) Those with experience will use a dedicated DVD player for playing DVDs. DVD players are inexpensive to replace.

 

Anyone considering the purchase of a Magnavox H2160MW9A HDD/DVD recorder *must* begin their inquiry with this first post in Wajo?s AVS Forum sticky thread:

 

http://www.avsforum.com/avs-vb/showthread.php?p=12244086#post12244086

 

Notice that Wajo even addresses misleading, incomplete and incorrect information found in Magnavox and Philips HDD/DVD Recorder Owner?s Manuals.

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Thanks for the links. And, yes, I had misinterpreted the booklet on DVD-Rs being converted to DVDRs. What it says is DVD-RW/-R will be recorded in the DVDVR mode. (I forgot the V.) I thought since DVD-Rs normally use the DVD-VR mode, that would cause a problem, but after some online research I see it won't.

 

Always enjoy your informed posts, and thanks again.

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> {quote:title=voranis wrote:}{quote}

> I am a long-time DirecTV subscriber and it seems to me that it used to be that you owned the box outright in the old days.

>

> I guess you can look at it as the $99 being part of the lease but it sure feels like you are buying the box and then still having to pay a monthly lease fee. At least with cable you don't have to pay $99 up front for a box you don't own.

 

I too signed up in 1999 and back then they didn't have any lease plans and you bought and kept the boxes, but remember, those where just simple cheap receivers not expensive DVRs. When they first introduced DVRs the prices were several hundred dollars and folks balked at that so they came up with the lease plan. They don't publicize it, but you can still buy them outright if you want, all you need to do is call DirecTV, but it's going to cost a lot more than $99.

 

As for paying $99 up front, it's no different than leasing a car. You usually have to make an up front payment and then pay a monthly lease fee too. It just keeps the monthly payment lower. A lot of cable systems are starting to charge up front fees now for equipment too (especially HD). The one here just started in January.

 

They might as well have them back when we're done, after all, the DVRs are absolutely worthless if they aren't hooked up to DirecTV and won't work as a free-standing DVR or with cable or Dish. A lot of times, if it's an older model, they'll just tell you to throw it out instead of returning.

 

As a long-time customer, you should call them with your concerns and they may give a few months of a premium channel free or something else to help offset the cost. I got a deal recently. I upgraded the old standard receiver we still had in one of the bedrooms to a DVR and for being a "good" customer who pays his bills on time they didn't charge me the $99 and shipped it by Fed-Ex for free. They also told me to trash the old receiver.

 

Edited by: markfp2 on Mar 7, 2010 12:12 AM

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*I got a deal recently. I upgraded the old standard receiver we still had in one of the bedrooms to a DVR and for being a "good" customer who pays his bills on time they didn't charge me the $99 and shipped it by Fed-Ex for free. They also told me to trash the old receiver.*

 

Mark,

 

We got a similar deal a year ago when we upgraded our living room TV set to HD. We've been with Direct since 1997 and they offered us a HD DV-R for free and told us to trash the old receiver. We hung on to it in case the SD DV-R in the bedroom goes bad.

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Lynn, I'm doing the same thing. Last summer, I cleaned out the attic and finally tossed three original receivers I got back in '99. Of course, they were so old that they really were obsolete. I called Direct TV to see if they still would work and the CSR told me they hadn't been functional in several years.

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