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CineMaven

BEST Foreign Language Film Ever Made.

53 posts in this topic

Two of my absolute tip-top favorites are from le cinema francaise. I love the story telling of "Elevator to the Gallows" and "Quai Des Orfevres." Do you have any favorite foreign films? I'll tell you mine if you more of mine...if you tell me yours.

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*Tampopo*,

 

...but with considerable affection also for *Elivator To The Gallows*.

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Are you still the best? If you are, try this one:

 

Connect Cornel Wilde with Orson Welles, two steps.

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Cinemaven, here are some good foreign films that I strongly recommend;

 

O Cangaceiro (1953, Brazil) The first Brazilian film to become internationally known is a poetic adventure played and directed with a lot of energy. The director is Lima Barreto. Particularly striking is the pulsating music derived from folk theme.

 

Plein Soleil (1959, France) Entertainingly suspenful film noir with the most beautiful color photography of the Italian and French Riviera. Directed by Ren? Cl?ment.

 

De Eso No Se Habla (1994,Argentina) An old man falls in love with an adolescent dwarf, against the wishes of the latter's arrogant, domineering mother. A poignant drama directed with gusto by a great female director, Mar?a Luisa Bemberg.

 

I Soliti Ignoti(1958, Italy) One of the funniest film I have ever seen about a group of incompetent thieves planning an elaborate robbery of a pawn shop. The delightful comedy of errors was directed by Mario Monicelli.

 

Los Santos Inocentes (1984,Spain) Exploited workers on the estate of a wealthy family in Franco's Spain of the 1960 have to cope with personal problems. Directed by Mario Camus.

 

I will be adding to this preliminary list later on.

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> {quote:title=CineMaven wrote:}{quote}

> Would you consider that the best SCSU? It isn't even foreign...and can you really call it a film???

 

Well, it seemed foreign to me. Maybe it should be placed in the "Documentary" since it was mainly narration.

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Of all the films made by Kurosawa the one I like the most is Derzu Uzala and is scheduled for March 30 at 8PM EST.

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There are so many foreign films among my favorites, it would be very difficult to pick a best one. Fellini, Bunuel, Kurosawa, Mizoguchi, Cocteau, Lindsay Anderson, all among my favorite directors. I like those films mentioned so far, except the Tupperware one... ;)

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If you like tango and would like to know what "really" happened to Carlos Gardel I recommend Doble o Nada (Tango Are for Two) from Argentina, directed by Jaime Chavarri.

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From France alone, my favorites would include:

 

The Wages of Fear

Children of Paradise

Forbidden Games

The Mother and the ****

Les bonnes femmes

Un couer en hiver

The Fire Within (Le feu follet)

Jules and Jim

 

It occurs to me that this is not the jolliest list of films! By the way, Plein Soleil (aka Purple Noon) is based on Patricia Highsmith's novel The Talented Mr. Ripley. These two are fun to watch together. Alain Delon and Maurice Ronet or Matt Damon and Jude Law? Then again, why choose?

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I like "Sanjuro" and "Wild Strawberries" and "La Dolce Vita". And "L'Eclisse" for the unique ending. Not to mention "Ordet"! I really can't pick a best. Too many great ones.

 

Edited by: LittleAbner on Mar 16, 2010 2:36 AM

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How about Jean Renoir's Rules of the Game. Made in that year of great movies: 1939.

 

Edited by: LittleAbner on Apr 15, 2010 2:05 AM

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I think "Au Revoir mes Enfants" is a wonderful film. I loved the story and the look of the film is just gorgeous.

Others I enjoyed:

Fannie and Alexander

Wild Strawberries

Le quai des brumes

Le Jour se l?ve

 

Mephisto (1981)

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'Cinema Paradiso' and 'Mujeres al Borde de un Ataque de Nervios' ('Women on the Verge of a Nervous Breakdown').

 

Wow! What a interesting forum! Where else would I have felt the need to look up

'Il Mondo Maraviglioso dei Tupperware' and 'Le Bete de Yucca Flats'?

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It would be impossible for me to pick just one, so here are my favorites:

EL LAZARILLO DE TORMES (1960)

FABIOLA (1949)

Le Diable au Corps (1946)

SENSO (1954)

Il Gattopardo (1963)

to name just a few

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I know some may disagree violently with me, for various reasons, but noone has mentioned Pasolini yet. His "Gospel according to Saint Matthew" is for me not only one of the great films but one of the most moving retellings of the Passion in all art (which would include Bach's). Both in this and in its purposely rudimentary camera technique, it is the polar opposite of a Hollywood retelling of this story and puts the focus squarely on the words of Christ as related by Matthew.

 

"Hawks and Sparrows" is another one I really enjoy, with the great Tot?, a simple story, and again simple camera work supporting some incredible twists and ironies. But its appeal may be less than universal given Pasolini's attempt in this film to marry, all'italiana, Catholicism and Communism, whether with a capital or a small "c."

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Being Italian, I tend to love films from my own heritage,but the ones I would love to see again,never seem to be shown. FABIOLA of course,the one and only film made by the Italians at Cinecitta before MGM got there for BEN HUR. I would give anything to see, ANNA with Silvana Mangano. This film was condemned,when I was a boy,because it was about a nun's past life, ,but my older brothers sneaked into the theater and I saw it. Funny, how two of the songs from it became popular on The Hit Parade at the time,El Negro Zambon (Anna) and Non Dimenticar, which was even recorded by Nat King Cole,who had a hit record of it! One of the waitress at the night club in the film, is played by a very young Sofia Loren in a blond wig! I still have the old 78RPM of the MGM record of the two songs, released with Silvana Mangano's dubber doing the vocals. I'll never understand why in an Italian film,the dubber is singing for Silvana Mangano..... in Spanish! You can find these two songs from the film on YouTube and they have always been in Spanish for some odd reason!

MADONNA OF THE SEVEN MOONS, an interesting film and ROMA ORE 11,this film scared the hell out of me as a child. It starts off with several hundred women all applying for a single job in war torn Rome in an old building. They are waiting on an old spiral stairway,one women attempts to push her way to the head of the line and ............. The rest I'll keep to myself just in case they ever show this film again!

 

Edited by: incasting on Apr 10, 2011 3:32 AM

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Having not the slightest idea of what may be the most well made foreign film of all time I can happily forget about that?but after having watched Smiles of a Summer Night for probably the third or fourth time in my life, I am quite bowled over (this time) and would like to dare nominate this film as the best foreign comedy ever made, at least that. Most foreign film lovers have seen this, it?s a recognized gem; appealing actors all who do a great job (the women are unbelievably attractive, each in their own way), and a screenplay for the ages, wordplay at it?s best. There is a short scene with the actress and her mother that is so good that it produces a dazzling effect. But the standard is evident throughout. Move over, Oscar Wilde. But the idea of ?well-made? is what makes me bring the film here. There is a sort of Classical convention present, the comedy of manners, of love, where those who are married, those who are not, those who have mistresses, those who do not, those who have neither and would fain have something, those who indulge too freely but (maybe) would like to settle down, get what they want and the little story ends without a loose end in sight. There is a sense of construction from beginning to end, like a good piece of music without a single false note. The best foreign comedy ever made?maybe.

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Anything by Bunuel, but especially *Tristana* and *Belle De Jour* for Deneuve fans.

 

And because of Halloween, Spanish filmaker Erice's, *Spirit of the Beehive*, which has a Frankenstein clip

 

 

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