HollywoodGolightly

"She Wore a Yellow Ribbon" (1949)

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I looked all over the place for a thread about She Wore a Yellow Ribbon but couldn't find one - and I think it deserves a thread of its own.

 

This is definitely one of Ford's best westerns and one of the greatest performances by John Wayne. It is also the only film of Ford's Cavalry trilogy to have been shot in Technicolor.

 

Here is the trailer:

http://www.tcm.com/mediaroom/index/?o_cid=mediaroomlink&cid=26278

 

yelloribbonlc.jpg

 

TCM will be showing She Wore a Yellow Ribbon today at 4pm ET

 

*She Wore A Yellow Ribbon* (1949)

An aging Cavalry officer tries to prevent an Indian war in the last days before his retirement.

Cast: John Wayne, Joanne Dru, John Agar, Ben Johnson Dir: John Ford C-104 mins, TV-PG

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John Wayne does have a character that allows him to show his acting talents. And he does a fine job. One of his best films, and I think its my favorite of his.

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Wayne's best performance. Unlike anything else he's done, it's some of the best screen acting I've seen. This is the most sentimental, but also the best, of Ford's cavalry trilogy. A wonderful film.

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redriver: I love everything about this movie but that "weakness" line. There is so much vulnerability and humanity as well as strength in Nettles. I stop seeing John Wayne and see the character. I understand this came out the same year as Sands of Iwo Jima and that's why he didn't get an Oscar nomination for this as you only get one per category.

 

I noticed a similarity between nettles and Roper, the soldier William Holden plays in Escape from Fort Bravo., such as growing flowers and a loyal aide. Roper was much tougher on the outside but his humanness finally came out too.

 

Glad we're on the same page again-or almost.

 

Edited by: wouldbestar on Mar 28, 2010 8:39 PM

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It really is amazing that Ford was able to accomplish what he set out to do with "She Wore a Yellow Ribbon" and that was to put Frederic Remington paintings on the screen and give them life. I think he succeeded for the most part, I always felt that you could blow up almost any frame from that film and hang the picture and have it considered a work of art ......

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I often wonder, was there ever a serious TV series set in a cavalry post? (F TROOP being a little less than drama!) It's the perfect format. The story would write itself. The tough, but human commander. The hard drinking, Irish sergeant. The families of the officers, with the women unmistakably the boss in their households. Am I overlooking something? How could the networks have missed this? Had Ward Bond not done WAGON TRAIN...

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Redriver: I think this meets your criteria for a serious TV series about a cavalry post. There was a syndicated Western drama in the late fifties called Boots and Saddles that ran for a year or two

and took place on one. It was Gardner McKay?s first series, a year or so before Adventures in Paradise. It had a catchy theme that fit the idea of the show but I don?t remember much more than that. I think good old ZIV productions put it out but I?d not swear to it. Outside of that and Rin-Tin-Tin, I can?t think of anything else.

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Boots and Saddles" aired 38 episodes in the 1957-58 season. You can see some clips on you tube..

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That's perfect! I had never heard of BOOTS AND SADDLES. What a great title! I would have loved it. I watched Guy Madison as WILD BILL HICKOCK, Buster Crabbe as CAPTAIN GALLANT, and Jock Mahoney as YANCY DERRINGER. How did I miss a cavalry show? Thank you for this fascinating information. Now I REALLY wish I had a time machine!

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"Hey Wild Bill wait for me " Andy Devine as " Jingles " - Opening of every episode of " Wild Bill Hickok ", Saturday morning during the 1950's. See girls watch Westerns too.

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I caught most of *She Wore a Yellow Ribbon* again this morning:

 

I won't rehash my numerous writings on the film but one thing I noticed at the very end when Nathan and Tyree return to the fort after Tyree has gone in search of Brittles to give him the telegram that appoints Nathan to Lt. Col, Head of Scouts, was that as Nathan leaves the dance to go give his "report", Flint and Olivia join the dancing while Ross Pennell stands with his back to the partygoers and stands watch as if waiting til Nathan returns.

 

The movie makes a point of wanting us to believe that Tyree is the spiritual heir and Flint Cohill is the natural successor to Nathan Brittles and Ross Pennell just can't measure up.

 

But the shot of Pennell with his back turned, in a traditional, understated manner so typical of Ford that it goes almost unnoticed, indicates that Pennell will measure up and will grow to be a man that can fill Brittle's boots and be the leader he was. He, perhaps even more than Tyree and Flint Cohill, seems to understand at that moment the loneliness (despite his Army family and his friendship with Quincannon) and necessary sacrifice that is at the heart of Nathan's character.

 

With the juxtaposition, we see Flint and Olivia and Mac and Abby dancing indicating that Flint will become more like Mac, the traditional Army guy to whom wife and family matters, while Brittles, Tyree and Pennell signal the men who make the necessary sacrifices, including a happy personal life, to move the country forward.

 

I do have to admit, after the end, I thought, "oh good, I get to hear what Ben M has to say" and only then did I realize I wasn't watching the channel I thought I was but was watching Retroplex instead. :oops:

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Every so often one comes upon blighted soul who utteres the unutterable and berates the Duke's skill as an actor and as soon as I cease my "burn" I ask if they have seen this film and if they have my following question is who could possibly have done it better? My question is usually followed by silence.

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Lynn, in all the times I've seen this movie I've never noticed this. I'm waking up to it in the morning and will check this out. And I also get my stations mixed up at times. Thank you for the insight; I hope letting you know you're not alone was payback.

 

I just caught your scene and think you're on to something. Another thought is that the Army is made up of all kinds of people and there's a place for a privileged Eastern guy like Pennell as well as those old vets who know the territory inside out. In the end that doesn't matter as long as they're a fighting team.

 

Also, these men got little respect, even from their surperiors. The length of time it took to get a promotion was a running joke-3 years for a stripe, 10 or 12 years for 2nd to 1st Lt.-but considering what was being asked of and what it took out of them, this seemed absurd. The thing it did was show their loyalty to the Army and their country. With what's going on today, that part hasn't changed. Thank you to all those for whom this applies.

 

Edited by: wouldbestar on May 2, 2012 3:23 PM

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When films like *Fort Apache* and *She Wore A Yellow Ribbon* give the "Duke" a real good character to play , he usually responds with a strong performance. Its easy for some people to just give you the "its John Wayne playing another John Wayne character" critique. But he has quite a few really good roles in his resume, his total record speaks for itself. I think SWAYR may be my favorite Wayne film.

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This is a wonderful movie. I grew up as a kid watching John Wayne Westerns in theaters with my family. I saw this one in 1949 or 50. We also saw Fort Apache, Red River, Three Godfathers, Rio Grande, The Searchers, and just about all of John Wayne's war movies.

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Great Movie! Great Songs! John Wayne Rocks!

 

 

This 1949 Movie Rocks! I Hope TCM shows it again; very soon!

 

 

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This week TCM showed She Wore a Yellow Ribbon introduced by a guest host.  He was so prissy that he referred to the "indians" as "native Americans" as in "The cavalry went out to fight the native Americans."  Come on, already, John Wayne fought the "indians," John Ford directed movies about fighting the "indians," the indians fought the indians.  Must we have such nonsense from a guest host who is more interested in his political correct standing then in telling the truth about the indians.

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