movieman1957

What Are You Listening To?

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Listening to audiobook, Unsheltered, by Barbara Kingsolver, read by the author, a wonderful writer blessed with a great speaking voice!

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Information Please!

Where can I find Warren Zevon's 'Werewolves of London' --specifically the one which he did LIVE in Philadelphia? I think that's the best version of it he ever did, but it's dang hard to find!

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On 2/20/2019 at 5:39 PM, Sgt_Markoff said:

Information Please!

Where can I find Warren Zevon's 'Werewolves of London' --specifically the one which he did LIVE in Philadelphia? I think that's the best version of it he ever did, but it's dang hard to find!

 

Internet Archive has two audio files of Warren Zevon at The Theater of the Living Arts:

https://archive.org/details/wz2000-03-17.flacf

https://archive.org/details/wz2000-12-02_D1-ed.sbeok.flac16

 

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Me thankum you heap much! I had a subscription to some kind of concert vault website for a while, but could never find it. I totally overlooked the obvious. Gonna check these out...!

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On 12/28/2018 at 4:47 PM, Sgt_Markoff said:

As it so happens, I am an enthusiastic fan of the violin and fiddle in the sphere of blues. Violin-centric blues are some of the best I've ever enjoyed. Lonnie Johnson and the Johnson Boys, for example. You can find whole albums of this type of stuff. Its a change from constant guitar-based blues.

 

I've always liked Lonnie Johnson's violin playing, too, I kinda wish he had recorded more on the instrument. Do you know if there is a album that compiled his work with the Johnson Boys? Seems I haven't seen many titles under that name, tho some multiple artist compilations feature a track (or two? I'm only recalling "Violin Blues" at the moment, aside from some of his earliest recordings. When I first heard it I didn't think it was him playing 'cause I didn't know anyone played violin and sang at the same time.)

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For a long time I was really obsessed with the early string jazz/blues material and was digging up everything I could find in the ways of jazzish violinists and guitarists and small bands and whatnot. I felt like I had pretty much exhausted everything the internet had to offer until about a year ago I had a musical revelation when I discovered the Sons of the Pioneers, much to my own surprise, not being a huge fan of country music in the past. What surprised me even more, tho, was that this band included a fine string jazz duo that I had never heard of in all my searchings and researchings on the internet for so long. I thought I'd heard it all, but these two were tucked away in a western band, where us jazz fans weren't supposed to find them.

 

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Quote

Do you know if there is a album that compiled his work with the Johnson Boys?

--Kay

ah yah the Sons. Love em. You also a fan of Bob Wills & the Texas Playboys and ...Milton Brown and his Brownies? Western Swing! Great stuff.

Now for violin blues yes I can recommend an LP. Look for 'Violin, Sing the Blues for Me'. But I can't say whether it is exclusive to his band; it may be --just as you've declared here--a compilation of many fiddlers with just a few tracks by the Johnsons. You'll have to see for yourself when you look it up.

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Hi Kay;   I wonder if you also enjoy some modern Guitar \ Violin music like The David Grisman Quintet?

It is fusion in the sense the music is a combination of jazz and bluegrass.    Growing up playing classical music on the violin until I switched to jazz guitar,  I have a love for guitar \ violin music (even some country if it isn't too-country).

 

 

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This is the second such personal confession I've heard this week. Someone else confided to me their childhood stage career

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29 minutes ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

Hi Kay;   I wonder if you also enjoy some modern Guitar \ Violin music like The David Grisman Quintet?

Thanks; I find it pleasant enough, but I do gravitate more toward earlier, hotter type material. I find I have a harder time finding music that pleases me as I progress forward in time. Tho that song did remind me of some of this British folky jazz material I remember being peculiarly fond of. Not really similar, but it made me want to hear this. I think this one is the bassist's showpiece. Pretty violin line, tho.

 

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47 minutes ago, Sgt_Markoff said:

ah yah the Sons. Love em. You also a fan of Bob Wills & the Texas Playboys and ...Milton Brown and his Brownies? Western Swing! Great stuff.

Yeah, I'm a big fan of early western swing, too. There's a wealth of great string band music in there. I love Milton Brown and early Bob Wills, tho I find later Wills material had too much accompaniment with the brass and accordion stuff. I like it smaller. Another good group is Leon's Lone Star Cowboy's, (I do have a weakness swing clarinet, it has a sweet sound in string bands, I think.)

It turns out there is only the one Johnson Boys tune featured on that comp. I recall looking at that one, and another "Folks, He Sure Do Pull Some Bow" comp, which does not feature them. I own neither CD, tho I probably should. There are some great compilations of this kind of music put out by the label Document, too, many of which are on YouTube.

Here's one with a backing clarinet, not heard often enough on blues records.

 

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Here's another solid western swing band. I love the violin playing on this track. Really pretty tone. Not sure who it is tho.

 

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Hey! Heads up!

I wanna get some more into Fairport Convention, Richard Thompson, and Steeleye Span. Who here is hip enough to help a bro out with some recommendations? Pipe up, now....tanks!

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JamesJazzGuitar, what jazz guitarists have you seen live? Probably McLaughlin and Dimeola? Who else?

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anyone got any recommendations on where to start exploring Townes Van Zandt? good pal recommended him to me but I'm seeking a place to begin

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On 3/26/2019 at 11:44 PM, Sgt_Markoff said:

Hey! Heads up!

I wanna get some more into Fairport Convention, Richard Thompson, and Steeleye Span. Who here is hip enough to help a bro out with some recommendations? Pipe up, now....tanks!

Not hip enough but I have a few Fairport and Richard Thompson CDs. That's a small

sample because I'd guess that they each have 25 to 30 albums out there. Unhalfbricking

and Liege and Lief by Fairport, fairly early albums in their long career. Rumour and Sigh

and Mirror Blue by Thompson. What can I say, I like them. The only Steeleye Span CD I

have is a 2 CD compilation album. Pretty good. No doubt SS have a whole truckload of

records out there too. I also have five or six Richard and Linda Thompson records. Of

those I Want to See the Bright Lights Tonight and Shoot out the Lights are, IMHO, the

best. I just have to wonder, is anybody buying recent Fairport Convention

albums? I kind of doubt it. Over and out, daddy-o.

 

 

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Ha! Last weekend I played some Al Jolson on a jukebox ...err...in a local dive bar ...medicinal supply house ...where I was stopped in for some refreshment refilling of my favorite doctor's recommended prescription. I played Jolson at full volume just to see what would happen. Needless to say, I escaped unscathed. I actually had to explain to the other patrons patients who it was and they still didn't grasp the import of the awful, fateful step I had just taken. Heck I might have wound up on the nightly news for doing such a thing. But it was grand! Ole Al really tremolo'd the joint!

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Al Jolson's blackface shtick isn't anywhere near as awful as his horrendous singing. And I say that as someone who finds blackface repellent and repugnant. But I guess if you just heard him, at least you didn't have to see his terrible, schmaltzy mugging and obnoxious sentimentality. 

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Not me. I like everything about him. Singing, radio shows, and his personality too. Its unusual to hear a classics movie fan panning Jolson so stridently. Usually, knowing even a little about Jolson and his era makes it clear he wasn't a bad guy.

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I wasn't passing a moral judgment on his character, just a personal assessment of his "talent". He's one of my least favorite entertainers, and I'm familiar with much of his work. Just awful, terrible garbage. When he gets going on one his horrendous "Oh, Mammy! Swanee ribber, Swanee ribber! I loves ya, Mammy!" jags, it's like the death of human culture. As bad as it gets.

But I'm glad you enjoy it. I don't begrudge anyone finding joy in things that I don't. 

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20 minutes ago, LawrenceA said:

I wasn't passing a moral judgment on his character, just a personal assessment of his "talent". He's one of my least favorite entertainers, and I'm familiar with much of his work. Just awful, terrible garbage. When he gets going on one his horrendous "Oh, Mammy! Swanee ribber, Swanee ribber! I loves ya, Mammy!" jags, it's like the death of human culture. As bad as it gets.

But I'm glad you enjoy it. I don't begrudge anyone finding joy in things that I don't. 

Yea,  I have never understood what audiences at the time saw in Jolson that would make him so popular.   To me he isn't a good dancer, singer,  or entertainer.       

I wonder if it was a generational thing; I.e.  I just don't like the 'style' of entertainers from that era.    So who were the other entertainers that audience at the time liked as much as Jolson?     

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1 minute ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

Yea,  I have never understood what audiences at the time saw in Jolson that would make him so popular.   To me he isn't a good dancer, singer,  or entertainer.       

I wonder if it was a generational thing; I.e.  I just don't like the 'style' of entertainers from that era.    So who were the other entertainers that audience at the time liked as much as Jolson?     

I'm sure there were some, but I don't know of anyone that was as big as Jolson at the height of his career. The entertainment landscape was a much different place then, obviously, and most folks didn't have the exposure to a wide variety of musical artists like they would by the 30's and beyond, with talking pictures, radio and phonographs growing more commonplace.

I enjoy scenes in films set in the early 1900's-1920s when it was more common for people to go to a music store to buy sheet music so that they could play popular tunes at home on their own instruments, rather than recordings of others performing them. 

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