movieman1957

What Are You Listening To?

1,008 posts in this topic

I'm listening to the birds chirp outside my window. They're having a "conversation" with other birds down the street. I'm nestled against a hill so the sounds seem to echo, reverberate. It's a regular aviary out there.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As it was record store day today, I went to my local record shop, and found the soundtrack for "That's Entertainment" and Good News/In the Good Old Summertime/Two Weeks with Love (from the "Those Glorious MGM Musicals" series). I've been listening to them on and off today. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 4/8/2019 at 6:22 PM, jamesjazzguitar said:

Yea,  I have never understood what audiences at the time saw in Jolson that would make him so popular.   To me he isn't a good dancer, singer,  or entertainer.       

I wonder if it was a generational thing; I.e.  I just don't like the 'style' of entertainers from that era.    So who were the other entertainers that audience at the time liked as much as Jolson?     

Hahah, I can't say Jolson is a particular favorite of mine from that era, tho I do find him kinda entertaining. More so than some of his contemporaries, Billy Murray, Vernon Dalhart, Henry Burr and the like, yet I don't think any of them were ever as popular as Jolson. Gene Austin was a big one, too, tho his famous versions of "Bye Bye, Blackbird" and "My Blue Heaven" pale in comparison to the Nick Lucas versions, I think...

I actually really love Nick Lucas. Very talented fella. I like his distinctive, piano-roll-ish guitar style, (a popular sound for banjo players at the time,) and I find that his high, clear singing voice has a stronger backbone to it than many of the other popular crooners at the time, (warble-y, off-key singing seemed to practically be a trademark of the genre. Not that I'm some kinda "on-key" snob!) Among all popular performers of this era, Nick Lucas is probably my most favorite.

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On ‎4‎/‎19‎/‎2010 at 3:35 PM, MissGoddess said:

Nat "King" Cole, how could I leave him off. I need to get one of his CDs, I used to listen to him more often. Love that creamy voice!

Along w/Tony Bennett-(l926-) Cole was The Chairman of the Board: Francis (Albert) Sinatra's favorite to just listen to the most, but he thought Dino was the funniest guy on this planet!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Finally listened to all 189 episodes (some repeats) of the Sons of the Pioneers "Teleways" radio program that are available on YT, and I've heard the "Tumbling Tumbleweeds" theme so many times that my head's liable to snap off and roll away. These shows are pretty close to them at their best; my only complaints would be about the unnecessary, gimmicky extra accompaniment from such un-western implements as vibraphone, Hammond organ and Ken Carson. Now I either have to start in on them over again or move on to the Festus-era "Lucky U Ranch" programs...

Gotta say, tho, as much as I listen to them I am constantly in awe at how much Hugh Farr adds to their sound- not just for his wonderful violin playing, but also for his soft bass voice which enhances their harmonies with a rich, resounding plateau. It's an amazing ingredient, and such serendipity that they got a voice like that as an added bonus with purchase of fiddler.

Here's a nice clip with Hugh playing and singing, both, discreetly elevating everything about the music. This is not my favorite song, nor my favorite era of the band, with Festus, er, Ken Curtis singing lead, and Bob Nolan since replaced by sound-alike Tommy Doss- but Hugh is good.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just to add something I favor a bit more... I find the Sons' harmonies sound their most beautiful when Lloyd Perryman's voice is in the front, (maybe even as beautiful as his voice is by itself,) and his presence was never more fetching than it is here.

Just one more, with Lloyd's tenor in the front again, but this time with Hugh singing bass, resulting in an especially lush sound. Bob Nolan sings the solo.

I'll stop now....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've been listening to some classic tunes by Tommy Roe. 

"Sweet Pea" is a really infectious number. I also like his version of "Cinnamon" a lot.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

New Members:

Register Here

Learn more about the new message boards:

FAQ

Having problems?

Contact Us