FredCDobbs

What Are You Watching Now?

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Thirty Day Princess (1934)--not only have I never seen it before, I never even heard of it (what? it's Cary Grant!).  This one gets a big thumbs up from me...the plot line may be over-used (common girl subs for absent princess) but this one escapes the ordinary with some real bite and wit...thanks to the trademark cutting humor of writer Preston Sturges (it's not quite Ben Hecht snark, but some scenes come close). It's one of Grant's early Paramount films,  and he still exhibits a bit of stiffness, but Sylvia Sidney is great in the dual role as the princess of  tiny poor Taronia, and her doppelganger, a starving actress.  Grant is the big city editor, who doesn't believe in US money going abroad, who she has to convince.  Edward Arnold does his usual rich/powerful character..this time as the banker who backs the loan, and isn't above any con to get his money back.  There are sub-plots, and a quick pace, as well as some great lines ('how many reporters work here?' 'About a quarter of them') that more than fill the short (about 75 min) film.  source: Classic Reel app on Roku.  Related image

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25 minutes ago, shutoo said:

Thirty Day Princess (1934)  

I just watched that one yesterday, as well. I wrote a mini-review in the "I Just Watched" thread. I enjoyed it, too.

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25 minutes ago, LawrenceA said:

I just watched that one yesterday, as well. I wrote a mini-review in the "I Just Watched" thread. I enjoyed it, too.

Thanks for the info (and your reviews!)...just read your posts...I think I liked it more than you (same with Upper World), and thought a little less of Sing and Like It, despite my fondness for Zasu Pitts and Pert Kelton.

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I'm enjoying Fay Bainter evening on TCM.  Just finished up with Woman of the Year, and now onto Jezebel.  I have to work tomorrow (OT woohoo) but I should be able to see the conclusion of Bainter's evening with The Secret Life of Walter Mitty with Danny Kaye. Kaye's movies aren't played often on TCM. 

Nothing like watching TCM in the glow of my red & white Christmas tree lights, my fireplace, and LED candles with a glass of Rose in hand... and my bird adding to the ambiance by chirping at me. 

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On 12/6/2017 at 8:08 AM, shutoo said:

As far as the coldest female characters, I'd still give the tip to Bette Davis watching her husband suffer in The Little Foxes, and Gene Tierney calmly watching the boy drown in Leave Her to Heaven.

 

Gosh, I remember watching both of these films and being left completely shocked at these 2 heartless women's actions. I mean, Davis' Regina was motivated ultimately by money. Her husband told her that he was leaving basically everything to their daughter. Meanwhile, Tierney's Ellen was motivated by her obsessive love for her husband (I guess both characters' husbands are involved in some way or other). Ellen was extremely jealous of anyone else who managed to capture her husband's attention/affection, and wished them out of the way so she would be his sole focus. 

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Working my way through Hitchcock's "Rear Window" (1954). It's literally been on my list for about 2 years now. I guess I was just never in the mood to watch it until now. 

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Bad Girl (1931) There were two things that stuck with me about this film:  The opening sequences are all about the harassment of women by their male bosses, and what they go through to keep their department store jobs..topical, eh? Well, timeless, I guess.  Secondly, I was surprised to read that this film was nominated for an Oscar, and actually won one for director Frank Borzage.  Yes, it's a good film...but Oscar? I guess I should go back and look at other films of that year to compare.  The plot is made interesting by the cynicism of the two title characters, James Dunn and Sally Eilers as a couple skeptical of love and just trying to scrape by in the depression.  They do get together and marry, but there never seems to be much romance or interest involved.  The misunderstandings between the two seem a bit contrived throughout--they never seem to talk, just assume, and the hospital scene is just bizarre.  The performances are good and it never lags.  The title is confusing...there are no bad girls here by any stretch of the imagination.  Good, but definitely not great.  

Image result for bad girl 1931

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On 12/11/2017 at 8:38 PM, NickAndNora34 said:

Working my way through Hitchcock's "Rear Window" (1954). It's literally been on my list for about 2 years now. I guess I was just never in the mood to watch it until now. 

I love Rear Window.  It might be one of my favorite, if not my favorite, Hitchcock film.  I've seen it multiple times and in the theater and I never tire of it.  My favorite aspect of the entire film is the courtyard that Hitchcock had built for this film.  It's amazing.

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Shutoo, If you don't me asking ... is your avatar from the Sister's sequence from The Show of Shows? Thanks.

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7 hours ago, TopBilled said:

Working on my review for 

Screen shot 2017-12-14 at 12.01.39 PM.png

This is one of my favorite romantic comedies of the 40s of all time! I loved Stanwyck in this 

 

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I've been watching the TCM Spotlight on "The Great American Songbook" all night.  I watched Girl CrazyAlexander's Ragtime Band and now I'm watching High Society.  I am loving this spotlight--because I love musicals. I also like Michael Feinstein is a good and knowledgeable host. 

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On ‎12‎/‎14‎/‎2017 at 4:00 AM, laffite said:

Shutoo, If you don't me asking ... is your avatar from the Sister's sequence from The Show of Shows? Thanks.

Actually, it's been credited on the internet as being from Kansas City Princess..while this makes sense because of the outfits (they're manicurists in the start of the film), I've seen the film several times, and never caught this exact pose of Joan and Glenda...but it could be an out-take still or something.  In other words...I'm not sure..I just liked the picture :)

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THE SANDPIPER (1965)

starring Liz Taylor, Richard Burton, & Eva Marie Saint

I found this at the public library where I live, and decided to check it out after seeing the trailer on YouTube about a year ago or so. I have about an hour left of the film; interested to see if anyone's lives go down in flames. 

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On 12/9/2017 at 6:54 AM, ❥ ᴘʀɪɴᴄᴇ said:

Just got done watching The Fountainhead, it's one of my favorite movies now.

The-Fountainhead.jpg

I'm a big fan of this rather oddball film but I also understand why others say it is too over the top and therefore more silly than great.

Still,   like Cooper did when he was making this film,   I can't take my eyes off of Patricia Neal.    Over the top,  yea, to a degree,  but still her screen persona just jumps out of the screen! 

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I found a good copy of CHRISTMAS HOLIDAY (1944), one of Deanna Durbin's films I hadn't seen before.

She and Gene Kelly play off each other very well. Gale Sondergaard is fabulous as Kelly's mother.

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What Makes Sammy Run? (1959)--part of the NBC Sunday Showcase series, based on Budd Schulberg's book.  This was very late 50's/early 60s 'aren't we cool and realistic' with some jazz score thrown in.  Actually, the performances were very good.  Larry Blyden is Sammy Glick, but the story of Sammy's unscrupulous quick rise in Hollywood is told by John Forsythe.  Forsythe is a mentor to over-zealous Blyden and quickly learns he will stop at nothing to get ahead.  The interesting part is that Sammy isn't personable or smart, in fact he steals other people's scripts to get into the studio system, but he is devious and pushy...and that's what works.  Barbara Rush is the supposedly smart woman who keeps believing in Sammy no matter what, which is confounding, but he's after Dina Merrill,  the spoiled daughter of the studio owner who, it turns out, is just as nasty as Sammy (right after their wedding, Sammy finds his cold, cruel bride in bed with another guy..so there, Sammy!).  What is bothersome throughout is how the Forsythe and Rush characters spout ethics, but end up going along with Sammy...and that's echoed in the ending:  A drunk Forsythe confronts Blyden, telling him he's going to finish his dark play about 'what makes Sammy run', and Sammy properly states that that's not the issue...what makes them run after him? Ahhh...

A good watch..a little 'All About Eve/The Bad and the Beautiful' ish... definitely entertaining.

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On 12/16/2017 at 5:53 PM, jamesjazzguitar said:

I'm a big fan of this rather oddball film but I also understand why others say it is too over the top and therefore more silly than great.

Still,   like Cooper did when he was making this film,   I can't take my eyes off of Patricia Neal.    Over the top,  yea, to a degree,  but still her screen persona just jumps out of the screen! 

Right she was so beautiful. Cooper is lucky to have kissed her, i would have ended up marrying her.

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Scarlet Street (1945)

starring Edward G. Robinson, Joan Bennett, Dan Duryea, Margaret Lindsay... I'm liking this so far. 

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EINE KLEINE NACHT MUSIK (1977) 

starring Liz Taylor, Len Cariou, Diana Rigg, and Hermione Gingold. I don't know whether or not I'll like this. I'm a huge fan of Stephen Sondheim's, but we shall see if this adaptation does the stage musical justice. 

(or, as it's more commonly known, "A Little Night Music") 

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On 12/18/2017 at 3:26 PM, NickAndNora34 said:

Scarlet Street (1945)

starring Edward G. Robinson, Joan Bennett, Dan Duryea, Margaret Lindsay... I'm liking this so far. 

Well? May we know the final verdict? Or maybe you discussed it on another thread? Some (like me, for one) consider this one a noir tour-de-force.

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