FredCDobbs

What Are You Watching Now?

2,825 posts in this topic

18 hours ago, speedracer5 said:

I’m watching one of the noir films I recorded on Audrey Totter day— “The Set-Up.” I love noir and I love boxing. 

Great film. Director Robert Wise, Robert Ryan as the lead, plus Totter...can't go wrong with that combination!

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Island of Love on tcm app..the picture of young Walter Mattheau is the same one used in Arsenic and Old Lace as a pic of Raymond Massey..is it the stock photo for psycho-kid-who-grows up to be-gangster?

That may be the highlight for me..good cast wasted..

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Watched a couple of episodes of Thriller and seemed disappointed. But I believe now I was expecting too much. Still quite good and it's great fun to learn the cast. I like the way the Boris introduces them just prior to the story. Interesting faces that (apparently) did not make a major splash later on, some of them anyway.

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13 hours ago, shutoo said:

Island of Love on tcm app..the picture of young Walter Mattheau is the same one used in Arsenic and Old Lace as a pic of Raymond Massey..is it the stock photo for psycho-kid-who-grows up to be-gangster?

That may be the highlight for me..good cast wasted..

I love Betty Bruce, who played Tessie Tura in Gypsy. She's great in Island of Love.

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Trying to get through Early Summer (51). Have had two sittings and about halfway through and will struggle on or at least attempt to. If anyone else says "It's about time Noriko should marry," one more time, I may go into convulsions. The camera is at the end of the hall, ground level, as we see members of the household pitter-patter from room to room in their kimonos etc. The women debate marriage, those married vs those who are not, but spend most of the time giggling. The little boy in the family is a snot and he probably got that way living with such an unwatchful family. I know there are those who fall over themselves in love with Ozu and I can get that to an extent because I liked the first of this trilogy, Late Spring, which I gave 5 out of 5 stars on the like scale. That was vastly superior that this one, so far. At least Setsuko Hara had a scene where she wasn't giggling or smiling, She was given a little depth along with a couple of others and there some lyrical scenes that invited a little reverie or meditation. Like music, almost. In the later film she is, like the rest of the cast, just one of an ensemble group who simply move around in a tedious manner. Ozu seems to be taking everything for granted in the second film. It has a completely different feel to it. I have enough respect for the director to feel that the film could be redeemed (for me). Very rare, in fact unprecedented, that I should speak of a film at this length without having completed it.

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8 minutes ago, laffite said:

Trying to get through Early Summer (51). Have had two sittings and about halfway through and will struggle on or at least attempt to. If anyone else says "It's about time Noriko should marry," one more time, I may go into convulsions. The camera is at the end of the hall, ground level, as we see members of the household pitter-patter from room to room in their kimonos etc. The women debate marriage, those married vs those who are not, but spend most of the time giggling. The little boy in the family is a snot and he probably got that way living with such an unwatchful family. I know there are those who fall over themselves in love with Ozu and I can get that to an extent because I liked the first of this trilogy, Late Spring, which I gave 5 out of 5 stars on the like scale. That was vastly superior that this one, so far. At least Setsuko Hara had a scene where she wasn't giggling or smiling, She was given a little depth along with a couple of others and there some lyrical scenes that invited a little reverie or meditation. Like music, almost. In the later film she is, like the rest of the cast, just one of an ensemble group who simply move around in a tedious manner. Ozu seems to be taking everything for granted in the second film. It has a completely different feel to it. I have enough respect for the director to feel that the film could be redeemed (for me). Very rare, in fact unprecedented, that I should speak of a film at this length without having completed it.

I haven't watched Early Summer yet. You may have noticed that I'm generally a fan of Ozu's work (I've reviewed a lot of it in past few months), and I've been working my way through his movies as I come across them. I may be watching that one sometime soonish. They're not all masterpieces, and I find that I have to be in the right mood for them, especially as they became more formalized, with a lot of the action seeming banal and dull until something clicks for me and I see how it all comes together. Despite the universality of many of his topics, Ozu's films have such a distinct tone and manner that they become the cinematic equivalent of bonsai cultivation, much as Kenji Mizoguchi's films have the cultured refinement of a Japanese tea service. Both can have a unique beauty, while others view them as moribund and pretentious.

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BRING ON THE GIRLS (1945), a charming wartime musical comedy from Paramount. 

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2 hours ago, TopBilled said:

BRING ON THE GIRLS (1945), a charming wartime musical comedy from Paramount. 

This has been on my youtube watch list for a long time..sounds fun ..will try to get to it soon

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9 hours ago, shutoo said:

This has been on my youtube watch list for a long time..sounds fun ..will try to get to it soon

I started it once a month ago and only got through the first twenty minutes due to an interruption. And I realized yesterday I had never finished it. BRING ON THE GIRLS has a lot going for it. But it's one of those films where you have to put yourself into a wartime mindset. If you look at it with today's eyes, it's dated fluff. But if you can imagine what a film like this meant to audiences in 1945, it takes on a whole extra meaning. Some of the comedy and dance scenes are a lot of fun. The ending is a real scream. And I believe this was the only time Veronica Lake was photographed in Technicolor. I gave it a 9 out of 10 on the IMDb.

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Going to see the TCM presentation of South Pacific (1958) in theaters for its 60th anniversary. I don't believe I've ever seen this one all the way through... 

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A High Wind in Jamaica (1965) - TCM

w/ Anthony Quinn, James Coburn, Dennis Price, Lila Kedrova, Gert Frobe and Nigel Davenport

I've been looking forward to seeing this one.

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Watching GOIN' TO TOWN (1935) on Starz. Mae West is a riot in this film.

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I am watching the 1951 Alice in Wonderland.  This is such a strange film.  My favorite parts are: the song that the flowers sing, the Caterpillar, and Alice's disgust at the Tea Party.  "Of all the silly nonsense, this is the stupidest tea party I've ever been to in all my life," she says. 

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A really clever British war film called ALBERT R.N. from 1953. I've never seen anything like it before. 

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I turned on TCM and just happened to tune into the part of Double Indemnity when Fred MacMurray and Barbara Stanwyck are in the grocery store trying to discreetly discuss their scheme.  MacMurray, with his towering height, and Stanwyck with her cheesy wig and big sunglasses, are anything but inconspicuous. 

I love the part in the film when the witness from Medford, Oregon keeps listing all the Oregon cities--Klamath Falls and Corvallis... It's fun when I hear Oregon mentioned in old movies.  I also appreciate that Oregon was pronounced correctly--"Ory-gun" versus "Ory-gone." 

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Right now I'm watching Best Foot Forward.  I've tried watching this movie twice before and didn't like it.  I cannot explain it, but somehow the film is growing on me.  I might *gasp* kind of like it now? 

Who knows? I guess Best Foot Forward caught me on the right day.  

My favorite part of this film is Nancy Walker.  Her performance as Rhoda's mother, Ida, is etched in my mind, so it's interesting to see her looking so young.  

June Allyson, who isn't normally a favorite, though I don't vehemently hate her, she's just meh to me, is pretty good too.  I also really love Gloria DeHaven's singing voice. 

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1 hour ago, speedracer5 said:

Right now I'm watching Best Foot Forward.  I've tried watching this movie twice before and didn't like it.  I cannot explain it, but somehow the film is growing on me.  I might *gasp* kind of like it now? 

Who knows? I guess Best Foot Forward caught me on the right day.  

My favorite part of this film is Nancy Walker.  Her performance as Rhoda's mother, Ida, is etched in my mind, so it's interesting to see her looking so young.  

June Allyson, who isn't normally a favorite, though I don't vehemently hate her, she's just meh to me, is pretty good too.  I also really love Gloria DeHaven's singing voice. 

Nancy Walker has a good musical number in BROADWAY RHYTHM (1944), made a short time after BEST FOOT FORWARD.

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On 9/2/2018 at 6:19 PM, speedracer5 said:

Right now I'm watching Best Foot Forward.  I've tried watching this movie twice before and didn't like it.  I cannot explain it, but somehow the film is growing on me.  I might *gasp* kind of like it now? 

Who knows? I guess Best Foot Forward caught me on the right day.  

Yes, a day when you had your best foot forward.

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In honor of Burt Reynolds, I'm watching "Smokey and the Bandit." 

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Just finished the 1933 Fox production of State Fair.  Since the musical 45 version is one of my favorite musicals, it's surprising, to me at least, that I think I've only seen this version once before, years ago.  It's pre-code, so the relationship between the son Norman Foster and Sally Eilers is much more suggestive..they weren't just singing and holding hands...and sweet little Janet Gaynor says she feels like " raising hell". I'd forgotten at the end, dad Will Rogers makes the remark that his beloved pig Blue Boy is destined to become ham...that's upsetting...Same story, of course, and Gaynor steals the show.

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